The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind - Game of the Year Edition Image
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9.1

Universal acclaim- based on 125 Ratings

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  • Summary: The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind Game of the Year Edition includes the original game of Morrowind, plus the Tribunal and Bloodmoon expansions. In Morrowind, you can explore exotic locations, including epic dungeons, detailed cities, and vast landscapes. Each area in Tribunal comes completeThe Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind Game of the Year Edition includes the original game of Morrowind, plus the Tribunal and Bloodmoon expansions. In Morrowind, you can explore exotic locations, including epic dungeons, detailed cities, and vast landscapes. Each area in Tribunal comes complete with new creatures, quests, armor, and weapons. Bloodmoon takes you into the frozen island of Solstheim, where you can become a werewolf and indulge your thirst for the hunt. Morrowind and its expansions feature enhanced graphics, in-depth gameplay, and innovative character development. Expand
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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 21
  2. Negative: 1 out of 21
  1. Sep 18, 2013
    10
    AMAZING ON PC, they added the new improved journal system, and with the expansions and Patches, its literally has no bugs
    amazing story that
    AMAZING ON PC, they added the new improved journal system, and with the expansions and Patches, its literally has no bugs
    amazing story that rivals that of the successors to the franchise.
    great voice acting
    a pure RPG game, the combat is a little unbalanced, but its because the game adds into effect your attributes and your luck, and your skill with your current weapon.
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  2. Sep 8, 2011
    10
    you thought Deus Ex was too long a game? Ha - don't even touch this one then; despite putting around 100 hrs into this game i never finishedyou thought Deus Ex was too long a game? Ha - don't even touch this one then; despite putting around 100 hrs into this game i never finished it; not for diminishing fun - real life simply wanted its share of time at some point; perhaps wasn't the best of games to be my first ever full RPG (as opposed to games that have RPG aspects such as System Shock etc) - simply because it sets the bar so incredibly high! what i actually liked about the game is how in the very beginning i was clueless on what to do and especially on how to heal! because later on that actually gave me the feeling (after i figured out what to do and obtained ways to regenerate health) of having become a part of the world of Morrowind - talk about immersion! reagarding the expansions: tribunal was OK (i like the outdoors setting of Morrowind much better than the city setting of Tribunal), but i loved bloodmoon because of its gorgeous winter setting and new gameplay elements; one interesting hint/warning: if you ever decide to give the king in Tribunal what he had coming to him then try to save that for the end of the game or at least do not take and use his enchanted item - that's when i stopped playing the game simply because there would not have been any point to it anymore (just to clarify a little: this action does not break the game, but rather the item is simply too powerful and if you have most of the story still ahead of you using it would simply ruin the fun); one thing that really bothers me about this game and others (fallout) is the lack of voice recordings - especially in this game there is TONS of conversation material but yet it's all just reading; the reason i don't take off points for that is because i realize that the huge amount of voice acting and recording this would require would be prohibitively expensive; the other con would perhaps be that this game simply isn't worth playing if you don't have a lot of time to play - you simply won't be able to get your character developed or any appreciable amount of the main and side quests done Expand
  3. Oct 23, 2010
    10
    An amazing version of this game bringing together so much content it's kind of ridiculous. I still play this game to this age and have contentAn amazing version of this game bringing together so much content it's kind of ridiculous. I still play this game to this age and have content left to do. Expand
  4. Apr 12, 2015
    10
    Morrowind may be the greatest RPG ever created; it is not without its flaws, and requires dedication and patience to play, but it rewards thatMorrowind may be the greatest RPG ever created; it is not without its flaws, and requires dedication and patience to play, but it rewards that dedication like no other game.

    Morrowind is a game for explorers: set mostly on the island of Vvardenfell, it immerses you in perhaps the richest game world created to date, with kilometres of geography to explore from the claustrophobic swamps of the Bitter Coast, to the sparkling beauty of the Ascadian Isles, to the harsh wastes of the Ashlands and much, much more. The lore of the world is equally rich, with a complex historical, political and cultural background that will take you hours and hours to fully understand, if you ever do. The best part is that this lore isn't just there for interest - it's directly relevant to both the main and the myriad 'side' quests, which are often just as immersive as the main quest, and constitute a full game in their own right.

    Vvardenfell is a harsh, unforgiving place. The native dark elves, or Dunmer, are a gravelly-voiced, proud and reserved people who by-and-large regard outlanders, such as yourself, with little more than disdain. That is, until you prove yourself to them. This is perhaps a reflection of the land they inhabit, a volcanic island infested with all sorts of nasty predator, and plagued by constant infighting between the great houses of the Dunmer, as well as countless other factions such as the Temple, the Empire, the Cammona Tong etc., most of which you can join. The history of the world is incredibly rich and original, and is tangled in the conflicting lies of those who wrote it - whose side you believe is up to your own interpretation. There are hundreds of books scattered throughout the game world to help you with this, but most of it is picked up in a sort of osmosis as you wander through the island, which is so alive with its own history, perhaps due to the rather backward-looking inhabitants.

    The gameplay is equally harsh and unforgiving. You are thrust into the world with vague directions to see a guy in Balmora, and no equipment but what you can beg, steal and eventually earn. You are not handheld, there is no levelling system, and stumbling into fights you can't win is a common feature of your early days. This imparts a sense of vulnerability that's lacking in later titles, and a sense that the world wasn't just created for you to beat - it's been there long before you arrived and will still be there long after you're gone. It feels like a real place. There's no fast travel and no quest markers - finding things in the world means listening carefully to instructions you're given by NPCs, and this makes questing feel like real exploration - frustrating and long-winded but full of surprises due to the rich game world. This is not a game you can sleepwalk through; for even the basic quests you need to be switched on.

    For players of Skyrim I'd liken TES:V to a trip to the zoo and Morrowind to a safari. Sure, it's more effort, and it's dangerous, and the lions aren't marked out with a big sign, but that's sort of the point.

    This all makes it so much more rewarding when you reach your full potential - a god-like mortal wielding artefacts of legendary power, many of which you may have created yourself. The lack of levelling is not a missing feature - it's there to keep you on edge when you enter a fight, not knowing for sure if you can win, and make you feel like a badass when you're a high level, because you've earned it. That's not to say you won't be surprised now and again - there's always a bigger fish if you go looking for it.

    The quests are generally interesting, designed not just as excuses to send you down a dungeon to kill more undead, but as chances to expose you to the varied environments and lore of the world (all of which is detailed wonderfully in your journal for reference). This is fortunate, because the gameplay is easily the most lacking part of the game. Combat can be a chore, as it is essentially a click-fest. Whether you damage the enemy is decided by your skill levels, and this can mean repeatedly swinging your sword or spear or whatever only to see it harmlessly pass through your target. This is probably the game's greatest flaw, and one that I would unreservedly change to the updated system of Skyrim, or perhaps something like Dark Messiah.

    The graphics are a little dated, though still beautiful in their own way, and this can be fixed with mods. Animation and AI have aged badly too, and seeing NPCs standing facing a wall for, well sometimes forever, day and night, is also a little immersion breaking at times.

    But look beyond past these flaws, and you will be rewarded with the most immersive, rewarding and fascinating experience. An adventure like no other where you earn your place in a harsh world that at first seems totally alien, but gradually starts to feel like home as you grow to know and understand its people, its history, its gods and its soul. Oh, and do try the mods.
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  5. Sep 4, 2012
    10
    Utterly amazing, Bethesda managed to create a world that is just familiar enough that you dont feel uneasy, but alien enough that you areUtterly amazing, Bethesda managed to create a world that is just familiar enough that you dont feel uneasy, but alien enough that you are driven to explore, and will never know what you will find next. Coupled with lengthy quest lines and a very large number of side quests, you will never lack for something to do. The two expansions add significant content, to keep you busy for many many more hours. Expand
  6. Jul 13, 2011
    10
    This game is bloody amazing. I wish everyone would try this game at one point, as this is the richest RPG you're ever going to play. IThis game is bloody amazing. I wish everyone would try this game at one point, as this is the richest RPG you're ever going to play. I wouldn't even call it a game anymore, it breathes on it's own. Expand
  7. May 4, 2017
    4
    A hugely overrated game.
    I modded my game visually with graphics and sounds so that it looks up to date, or at least the best it can possibly
    A hugely overrated game.
    I modded my game visually with graphics and sounds so that it looks up to date, or at least the best it can possibly look which for me it looks damn impressive modded.

    Well it's a true saying that graphics do not make a game and neither does a fantastic sound track.

    The game brings you into a world with a seemingly large amount of depth which seems awesome, no hand holding, stuff is written in your journal and you have to proactively ask and use your brain.

    Well unfortunately where it fails so hard is the combat system, it apparently uses a dice roll system where you either hit an enemy or you don't regardless of accuracy, it defies all logic and is the most irritating thing to ever exist in a game.

    The game sinks so low in trying to make a game seem hard that it just becomes tediously boring and pointless to play.

    This game is a great game for those who had nothing else, in this day and age though it's a poor game in terms of combat.

    Story, music and game play outside of combat though is VERY good.

    I cannot recommend this game since combat is such a large element to this title.
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See all 21 User Reviews

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