Metascore
76

Generally favorable reviews - based on 37 Critics What's this?

User Score
6.4

Mixed or average reviews- based on 452 Ratings

Your Score
0 out of 10
Rate this:
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1
  • 0
  • 0
  • Summary: Dead Space 3 embodies deep space terror. Players take a thrilling ride through space that takes them to a hostile new planet, Tau Volantis. Fortunately, they are not alone this time around. The fully integrated drop-in/drop-out co-op feature gives players the option to play alone or team-up with a friend anytime. Players that choose to take down the terror together experience additional story details, side missions and gameplay mechanics only found when playing as John Carver. Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 22 out of 37
  2. Negative: 0 out of 37
  1. Feb 5, 2013
    98
    Dead Space 3 is still creepy, but this entry is more action-packed than previous games. That’s a good thing. Isaac’s intuitive new dodge roll makes avoiding the larger nercromorph attacks more manageable.
  2. Mar 18, 2013
    85
    Dead Space 3 is no more Survival than Dead Space 2. The game is therefore capable to maintain high the nervous tension and to involve players in an interesting adventure.
  3. 80
    At the end of the day the feeling that remains is that Dead Space 3 is a good game, but not a good Dead Space.
  4. Feb 5, 2013
    79
    The environment is continually interesting and involving, the character and enemy designs are highly accomplished, the third-person action is reliable and responsive, and the deep weapon crafting system adds intricacy. But the subtler aspects, the slightly more artistic elements, the more cerebral parts of the production; they take a back seat to the insanity. Hence, the epitome of flash over substance.
  5. 74
    All things considered, Dead Space 3 just isn’t made for those of us craving another horror experience. It’s far less scary and far more shooter-y than the previous games in the series. But for fans of set piece-based action games, Dead Space 3 has a pretty healthy buffet of amazing content. Just don’t spend any money on the microtransactions; EA needs to know that we’re not going to tolerate that sort of crap.
  6. Feb 20, 2013
    70
    A combination of an average shooter (that won’t appeal to shooter fans) and a (tension and atmosphere barren) survival horror game.
  7. Apr 1, 2013
    50
    Despite all these issues, Dead Space 3 isn't a bad game—but it's not a particularly good one, either. The focus on co-op, attempts to ditch the horror elements in favor of more mainstream sci-fi shooter aesthetics, and the disjointed, repetitive feeling of the project as a whole prevent it from ever becoming something that pops.

See all 37 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 80 out of 107
  2. Negative: 16 out of 107
  1. Feb 5, 2013
    10
    I am not sure if those that actually play/enjoy the Dead Space franchise are the ones leaving reviews. This game has not lost it's touch to the scares and frustrations that the necromorphs cause, and still finds a way to keep the story fresh. It is a double edged sword that Visceral had to deal with, if they change nothing then people complain about the lack of innovation.. they change something, people complain about fixing something that was not broken. The game is solid, keeps you on your toes, good replay value. This is $60 dollars well spent, and I hope people can look past some poor reviews. Expand
  2. Feb 19, 2013
    10
    Horrible reviews, the game is long, fun, interesting, and really keeps you in it until the end, yeah the fight's with unitologist feel stupid but they are short and not too many of them. And the crafting is extremely fun when you are in tau volantis because except of being obligated to have 4 weapons here i can have 2 weapons with 2 different ways of fire with an add on and make them way better. I started in hard from the beginning but also the game is hard and you will start to run out of stuff in the middle of the game forward because the qauntity of enemies increases incredibly. The game for me is a 9/10 or maybe even 9.5/10 contestant to game of the year. Expand
  3. Feb 5, 2013
    9
    First and foremost let me address the horror aspect. Is this as scary as Dead Space...no. Yet I think that's more to do with by outing 3 it's become familiar. However that doesn't make it less of an amazing game. The 2nd time I played through DS it wasn't as scary either. DS3 is most certainly still a horror game with awesome game play and an engrossing sci fi story. And that's what the series always was and still is. That's great and should be enough for any long term fans and new comers to the series. Expand
  4. Aug 24, 2014
    8
    I had a lot of fun with this game, the combat is fun, graphics are really good, the frozen planet is a nice change of scenery, the story was surprisingly good and i really loved the weapon crafting system. But the game doesn't really feel like dead space, i felt the crouching was not needed, there were too many human enemy encounters all necromorph for me, and the game doesn't have the same atmosphere of ds2 the game is just not scary. Great game overall, just doesn't feel like a dead space game Expand
  5. Feb 6, 2013
    7
    Dead Space 3 is a gorgeous title that once more thrusts Isaac Clark back into the disarray of Visceral Game's dystopian future. Apparently, in the time between the second and third games our engineering friend has become somewhat of a troglodyte, behind on bills and with a newly discovered penchant for sketching the very religious structures he feared, it's evident that Isaac's not in a good place. Still distraught over the loss of his girlfriend, he suddenly finds himself hunted by the formidably run (and well financed) Unitologist Church which, unlike our hero, remained quite busy during Mr. Clark's "Walden" days. While the game remains well acted, and though the music complements the appropriate moment, the writers immediately present you with a story that undermines the pre-established lore from both preceding titles as well as the supplementary material (books, dvds, ect). How for example, were the artifact's powers contained when previous attempts had failed? How did the construction workers not transform before the containment facilities were blown? I mean, wouldn't the spear-armed HVAC employee not make the evening news on at least 1 planet? How did the civilian population of every colony suddenly turn to fanatic Unitologist supporters overnight? While most games fall into similar tropes that can be highlighted when thought of for just a moment, the immersion factor often removes this quotient from the equation, we don't ask why Master Chief was spared in Halo 4, we don't question the motives of the Alliance Council in Mass Effect, and we certainly don’t mull over why Princess Peach always insists on having her parties on the top floor of her castle. And yet here I was, 20 minutes in and fleeing from a well armed army of religious fanatics wondering how it came to be. Perhaps it's series fatigue, but the story, like the matrix before it, is trying to delve deeper than was ever intended, and it's beginning to show. On the gameplay front, the controls are nearly identical to previous entries in the series, and while movement in the older games benefited from isolated chambers and limited enemies, the narrative transition makes moving around feel convoluted and slow. Enemies charge from multiple directions and soldiers lob grenades at the feet of your character, and yet the ability to respond is frustratingly limited. Like many preliminary critics suggested, it appeared as if the developers were attempting to create a budget version of Gears of War, and the control scheme is indicative of this. Targeting is tedious, and the slight auto assist that was pioneered over a decade earlier in Halo 1, is nowhere to be found. I often had to spend precious time lining up shots, only to be eviscerated from behind. In many titles such complaints could be overlooked, however with the increased (exponentially so) focus on gunplay, the system is simply antiquated. While the addition of a second player helps, it removes the most compelling aspect of Dead Space, which is isolation. This not only detracts from the plot, but the game play as well. While Mr. Carter's story is deep and emotionally well developed, it's hard to build anticipation and apprehension when a 13 year old is singing into their headpiece. Perhaps if played with a friend this would be nullified, however in the era of COD and Halo 4, your window of opportunity to experience this with a competent partner is limited at best. On the visual front, Dead Space is a feast for the eyes, from the glare of the neon lights to the individual hair follicles on Isaac's face, we are treated to a brilliant canvas that seldom disappoints. Unfortunately, much like an oil painting, the prima facie appearances belie the reality, as they simply coat a static world that prevents interaction. Want to shoot that toy robot? Insert random black mark. Care to break that window? Well here's one of 4 broken glass patterns. It's the type of minute complaint that only grows as the game progresses, and much as how Doom 3, initially dropped collective jaws, it was ultimately irrelevant due to the sheer limitations that existed in the environment. Although I acknowledge that the description thus far isn't flattering, it's the reality of Electronic Art's development cycles; original ideas cultivate dedicated followers, who are eventually traded in for mass consumer appeal. Usually this process involves expanding the scale of the story, placing a glossy sheen over the character models, and increasing the bust size of female characters to entice teens. From micro transactions to day one DLC, it's obvious that EA is merely in it for the money, and consequently innovation falls inversely as production costs skyrocket. This is not a condemnation of their business model, simply a call to reconsider their practices. Dead Space 3 is by all means a decent game, it's well acted, and fairly fluid, but to a dedicated Spacies (TM that), it's a disappointment. Expand
  6. Feb 12, 2013
    7
    I give this game 7 because while it has very few pure survival horror elements in it I still enjoyed it. True, it is no longer the same Dead Space that we experienced back on Ishimura, but the game is a pretty solid action shooter, I liked it as it is, but if Visceral games wants Dead Space to survive as a survival horror game, the baby of Resident Evil 4 that uprgaded it's poppa's ideas then it should do something very quickly. P.S. I still liked Isaac more when he was mute, seriously, he reminded me of Gordon Freeman, the Chuck Norris in geek disguise and now he talks so much I've lost that feeling of cool. Expand
  7. Jan 19, 2014
    0
    Not much words about this game. I stopped playing and having hopes on chapter 6, so can't say how it was until ending. But it was not worth to try more. Seems EA ruin every game they touch. In DS3 they changed everything good in First 2 games. Atmosphere, weapon crafting and endless pointless unskipable cut scenes are major changes which was enough to ruin whole game. So, rather replay few more times DS1 and DS2 than even try to play that!!! Expand

See all 107 User Reviews

Related Articles

  1. The Most Anticipated Video Games of 2013

    The Most Anticipated Video Games of 2013 Image
    Published: January 15, 2013
    Take a look at nearly four dozen of the coming year's most-anticipated games, from returning favorites such as BioShock Infinite and Grand Theft Auto V to new titles like The Last of Us and Watch Dogs.