User Score
7.3

Mixed or average reviews- based on 34 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 23 out of 34
  2. Negative: 3 out of 34

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  1. Aug 16, 2011
    9
    El Shaddai is, above all else, a prime example of how a video game can transcend its genre conventions to become a work of contemporary art. This game is both gorgeous and unique, with constantly shifting visuals that somehow straddle the line between surreal religious imagery and Tron-like aesthetics. For starters, you play as heaven's scribe, the namesake of the apocryphal Book of Enoch, as he hunts the fallen Grigori angels and delivers them to God before he decides to wipe out the planet with a great flood. The sheer boldness of not only referencing Judeo-Christian religion but also placing the game's story within the context of such a controversial text is commendable in this conservative age, and the integrity of the source material is maintained throughout. Strangely enough, though, Enoch (and his pal Lucifel) are both wearing Japanese name-brand Edwin jeans as a part of their holy garb. In fact, those jeans are all that are left on Enoch's body after sustaining enough damage, since the game uses no health bars or other UI elements on-screen and represents all pertinent stats through visual changes. As a result, there is no inventory management either. Power upgrades and weapon changes are all instantaneous, with Enoch steeling one of three weapon types from his foes (each carries its own pros and cons), and Fruits of Wisdom add to Enoch's latent abilities as they are gathered. The visceral combat actually feels like Devil May Cry or Bayonetta, which is appropriate since designer Takeyasu Sawaki originally worked on both DMC and Okami. The controls are simple, but intelligent use of the limited weaponry and rhythmic attack input add enough depth to keep things interesting. Also, the player's perspective will change between distant third-person, over-the-shoulder, and side-scrolling views, which not only makes the levels play in different ways but also makes optimal use of each stage's visuals. Side-scrolling stages may look flat, with cel-shaded platforms and parallax eye catches, while an over-the-shoulder view may be used while Enoch runs across a shadowed landscape towards a bright light that reveals the silhouettes of his enemies. It all comes together nicely, but if there is one criticism I could make about the visuals, it's the fact that El Shaddai still only uses 720p. While that resolution has become standard on even the greatest PS3 and XBox360 titles, the game uses such minimalism in its presentation that I think both systems could have handled true 1080p. The PS3's fans don't even come on during most of the 60 fps gameplay, so Ignition probably could've pushed the resolution higher and eliminated some of the game's jaggies. Some players may also find the combat to be a bit repetitive, but with its inherent depth and the addition of platforming, environmental puzzle solving, and even driving, things stay fresh through the ten or twelve hours of gameplay. It may not be the longest game in recent memory, but it warrants multiple playthroughs on various difficulty settings. Overall, I had a blast with El Shaddai, and its combination of visual flare and great story-telling places it firmly into Shadow of the Colossus territory. This could be an instant classic if enough people embrace its artistry. Oh, and as an added bonus, the game does allow you to switch between Japanese and English voiceovers, both of which are quite respectable. I would encourage all of you to give this one a shot. Expand
  2. Nov 7, 2011
    10
    An amazing game. loved the style, loved the characters, loved the enemies, loved the story, loved the ideas, loved the game.
  3. Nov 12, 2011
    9
    An amazing art game. All the love put in a videogame. It's different, like flower or katamari. Games like shaddai make you hope in the industry, it's a enemy of call of duty and fifa. I hope companies make more games like this (sorry for my english)
  4. Oct 16, 2012
    9
    This is one of those games that you need to experience. The art style and design alone are worth the price, but its also got some very creative gameplay. The idea of timed button combos instead of a heavy attack light attack system is very well implemented, and gives people who cant pull of the insane combos from DMC or Bayonetta a chance to fight well. This game has almost everything perfect, however, the story can be confusing at points, hence the 9 out of 10, but you will be fine as long as you get the main plot points. Expand
Metascore
78

Generally favorable reviews - based on 46 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 33 out of 46
  2. Negative: 1 out of 46
  1. 80
    El Shaddai it's a great game because of its concept and mixture of that creates on the player, and should be taken into account by those who seek something more than a game.
  2. Dec 12, 2011
    90
    While not a perfect game, the only real nitpick I have is the platforming sometimes became a little difficult due to the art style and camera angles, it's definitely an experience that shouldn't be missed.
  3. Oct 10, 2011
    87
    An entertaining action - adventure with strong religious overtones and quite exquisite audiovisual effects. [Oct 2011]