Metascore
85

Generally favorable reviews - based on 13 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 13
  2. Negative: 0 out of 13
  1. 100
    The definitive guitar tutorial that teaches wannabe guitarists in a fun and engaging way.
  2. 95
    While Rocksmith 2014 won’t be replacing the guitar teacher, it was designed as a supplemental tool to make learning and practice a lot of fun. I feel that it succeeds in this design and is an essential addition to any guitarist’s arsenal, whether you’re picking up a guitar for the first time or you’ve been playing for years.
  3. Oct 23, 2013
    92
    It says on a piece of paper in the box that you can learn to play the guitar in 60 days by taking the 60-day challenge. While I am not going to say this is 100% accurate, I can honestly claim that if you have the drive to learn, then Rocksmith will definitely be the best tutor you’ll ever pay for.
  4. Restrung and retuned to be the best guitar tutor available. Believe the hype. [December 2013, p82]
  5. 90
    While technical hiccups are a shoe-in with any game as complex as Rocksmith, the ones found here don’t mar the experience much. Since every facet of gameplay has been given a nice thick coat of improvement in Rocksmith 2014, issues that the original title was known for have either been removed entirely, or overhauled beyond recognition.
  6. Oct 22, 2013
    90
    It’s smooth, flexible, always encouraging, and makes practicing a pleasure rather than a chore.
  7. Oct 22, 2013
    90
    With Rocksmith 2014 the developers have done a great job expanding their original software. The new version of the “game” works much better than the previous one and the awesome Session Mode is incredibly fun. This is just software, anyway, and if you are trying to learn how to play guitar or bass, you should find a real teacher asap.
  8. With its extensive focus on learning and comprehensive library, Rocksmith 2014 is a must buy for guitar enthusiasts.
User Score
8.2

Generally favorable reviews- based on 38 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 15
  2. Negative: 3 out of 15
  1. Oct 23, 2013
    10
    I am probably a near perfect example of a totally new beginner who never had the discipline, drive, and patience to learn guitar via traditional means.
    Though I had purchased the original Rocksmith years ago, I made the mistake of purchasing the cheapest brand name guitar I could find on Amazon, the Squier Fender Bullet Strat ($99), which upon unpackaging had the strings touching the fretboard. I still don't know if this was due to shipping or the product itself... I was going to get it fixed at the music store a couple towns over, but never got around to it (I'm also a good example of procrastination).

    This time around I decided to do some more research before purchasing the guitar, but it seems the one that comes in the bundle is the best (or at least one of the best) for the price currently (Epiphone Les Paul Jr.). I had to dig around for my old PS3 component cable, found it, left the video on HDMI and simply plugged the audio portion from the component cable directly into my stereo. Tuning was a snap, and though during the very first lesson it felt awkward, I could tell I had made real progress by the very next day. They say you can learn in 60 days, and right now I'm a believer. I started before their online site was up (it's still in beta), but today it appears like a very good second screen tool to check your progress.

    Basically Rocksmith does for learning guitar what Mavis Beacon does for learning how to type. It makes the learning process fun, changes it up so it doesn't get too monotonous, allows you freedom to learn what you want when you want to, provides immediate feedback and rewards.

    I'm not an expert yet, but the thing is I'm having enough fun for this to be a daily habit. It's a console video game that teaches you a skill, and makes learning that skill fun enough to keep up with it over time. I hope this coming generation sees Rocksmith continue to refine this process with their xB1 and PS4 offerings, while adding piano, drums, and vocals.

    Who knows, maybe even Khan Academy and Rosetta Stone could have their own console versions. I remember "educational" games on the Magnavox Odyssey 2 back in the day. They were not fun. But the times and technologies have changed enough that I believe learning certain skills (especially musical ones) can be easy and entertaining at the same time.

    But back to Rocksmith 2014. I can't find a fault in it, and maybe that's because I'm a beginner, but the thing is, it makes me want to keep that guitar in my hands every day and keep on learning new songs/techniques, so it is perfect for me.
    Full Review »
  2. Nov 6, 2013
    9
    After learning how to play guitar successfully with the first Rocksmith I couldn't but buy this one, not only because I wanted to support Ubisoft for finally delivering a good game/program which truly teaches guitar, but also because I thought it would be fun to learn some new songs.

    Surprisingly, there are many improvements with this one. Loading times are almost non-existent, the menu is quicker and more intuitive, the lessons are much more numerous and you can learn a lot more than you did with the first game. The songs offered with the game are more diversified and although we still get too much indy rock and not enough blues, we still get the feeling the guys who chose the tracks had the mission to improve their catalogue.

    They got rid of the crowd/venues which made the game lag. They took the Guitarcade games and remade them so that they would be more fun and less frustrating. Good job!

    With the first Rocksmith, they figured out that nobody cared about the number of guitars you could unlock, and they reinvented their sound forge. They added a nice mode, called "session mode" which simply lets you improvise whatever you want, accompanied by an interactive band. Just the fact that you can play guitar and hear yourself wherever you may be on the menu is an improvement to me.

    They even took the time to modify and augment the precision of past songs. For example, Breaking the Law by Judas Priest didn't have slides during their chorus in the first Rocksmith. They corrected it in Rocksmith 2014 and you can now play the real song exactly like the real band played it.

    One thing, however, that I really don't appreciate, is the fact that they charge around 10 bucks to transport your first Rocksmith songs to the new Rocksmith. I'm not talking about the DLC you might have bought those automatically end up in your new repertory. No, I'm talking about the 50-ish songs you already bought when you bought the first Rocksmith. You already paid for those songs and they want to charge you for simply transferring them to their new game? That's rubbish and that's why they don't get 10/10. Other games such as Littlebigplanet 2 let you import your Littlebigplanet 1 content at no additional cost.

    What should come next? Online multiplaye and a recording studio. Online multiplayer would be a great addition, as long as lag isn't involved. It's hard to come upon fellow guitarists in real life unless you already have friends who are musicians, but if you have access to other Rocksmithers all around the world, it would be so fun to jam together, whether it be death metal with a Norwegian or blues with an American. Secondly, a recording studio should be the next big step for Rocksmith... Give us the power to record songs, turn them into mp3s or something and upload them on servers hosted by Ubisoft so that others can listen to us and rate us!
    Full Review »
  3. Mar 24, 2014
    9
    As a beginner, who never struck a single chord before, the rocksmith experience have been a roller coaster ride. First off, yes it works. It really works. And it is fun. But, if you, like me, never played before I think you should at least think about talking to someone who do play. The reason is, when you play rocksmith without guidance, the game will tell you if you play the wrong note or chord. But the game can not see what you are doing wrong. So, for me, for instance, I struggled with muting strings and holding my fret hand a bit off.

    A short talk and "lesson" from a friend did the trick and I went from 26% progression to 97%. Have played the game, every day now for two months and are already seeing a huge difference. I have learned several chords, are more familiar with the frets and notes. And have also started to play along to my favorite songs only using headphones and trying to play the right chords.

    But! The game crashes at times. I have tried to find out why. Some, on the boards, say certain DLC can make the console prone to crashing, some say that the amount of free space on the drive is the culprit. I have only had three crashes in two months time, no biggie, but still an issue.

    Verdict? Play this game, play more guitar. :)
    Full Review »