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74

Mixed or average reviews - based on 59 Critics What's this?

User Score
7.2

Mixed or average reviews- based on 41 Ratings

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  • Summary: Amplitude features over twenty songs composed for an optimal beatmatching experience by Harmonix with contributions from Freezepop, Danny B, Jim Guthrie, and more. Many of the developers from the original game worked on this reboot.

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Amplitude - A Cult Classic Reborn Trailer
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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 30 out of 59
  2. Negative: 1 out of 59
  1. Dec 31, 2015
    91
    A dream come true. It is the near perfection of the music/ rhythm genre.
  2. Jan 7, 2016
    80
    Amplitude is so obviously a labor of love that it's difficult to criticize it, especially given all of the ways in which Harmonix has addressed the concerns for fans who funded them on Kickstarter.
  3. Play UK
    Feb 24, 2016
    80
    A fitting tribute to the PS2 classic, albeit on that will struggle to hold the attention of those without solid rhythm action skills or fond memories of the original. [Issue#266, p.64]
  4. 75
    Amplitude is a labor of love, polished to a beautiful shine and put into fans’ hands by a developer that truly cares about the experience they are offering in revisiting this cult classic. Despite its clean exterior and simple, yet fun gameplay, I fear many will be rather quickly turned away by the steep difficulty curve and a track list that is only good, not great.
  5. Jan 11, 2016
    70
    The game’s lack of engaging narrative and experimental soundtrack are likely to alienate some of the more casual gamers who would give Amplitude a shot.
  6. Jan 5, 2016
    70
    Overall Amplitude’s return is an enjoyable one, though the game’s campaign set-list has just as many tracks that would clear the dancefloor as fill it.
  7. Jan 9, 2016
    40
    Amplitude is a let down. I really wasn’t sure what to expect when jumping in, but it did not live up to its PS2 predecessor. I’m genuinely a fan of rhythm games, and I have yet to play a rhythm game that I did not like. Amplitude sadly missed the mark. It feels bare, awkward, and incomplete. There isn’t a ton of content and the song selection won’t keep players hooked.

See all 60 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 6 out of 10
  2. Negative: 0 out of 10
  1. Feb 13, 2018
    10
    This is the best game i have ever played and i hope that everyone that plays it enjoys it like i did
  2. Feb 29, 2016
    10
    This is the most enjoyable experience I've had in a long time. I was a big fan of Frequency and the original Amplitude. This continues theThis is the most enjoyable experience I've had in a long time. I was a big fan of Frequency and the original Amplitude. This continues the awesomeness that was those two classic games, while adding new songs, and an overall better graphical experience. I can't recommend it enough! Expand
  3. Jan 5, 2016
    10
    First off I played the original Amplitude back in the day and am familiar with the gameplay. The original games were $40 and this one is oddlyFirst off I played the original Amplitude back in the day and am familiar with the gameplay. The original games were $40 and this one is oddly $20. If you aren't a music rhythm game person, or only listen to one genre of music...this game probably isn't for you. If you like music, especially electronic music, and like music rhythm games... THIS GAME IS FOR YOU!

    It seems like Harmonix really focused on nailing the gameplay. Streaking is emphasized from the get go, and is the only real way to rack up points. There's new multiplayer modes (team play!). The ships are color coded better to tell each player apart. There's a new concept of "Boss Songs" where you have to maintain a streak to get through the gates without receiving damage. Really Fun!!

    Then there's the soundtrack. I am an electronic music fan, and I love it! I see a lot of reviewers complain about not having any Weezer, or POD, or whatever but A. I don't think the reviewers "get it" - they don't get the cyber vibe of the game(I don't think that top 40 music would fit this game at all), and B. If I wanted to play those songs, I would go play Rock Band. I'd rather hear something new and refreshing that was created for the experience!!!

    There are "campaign" songs and 15 unlocks. It seemed like they made the campaign songs about a narrative(more on that later). Each song has different genres infused into, like Electro,Breakcore, Drum n Bass, Techno, Dubstep, and even some that feel like Steve Reich, Rock, and Fleet Foxes. There's a ton of variation in here. As you progress through each world, it seems like the tempo gets faster and faster.

    As you play through the campaign you unlock songs by Symbion Project (Concept is one of my favs), Freezepop, George and Jonathan, C418, etc.. a bunch of awesome indie electronic musicians which is really cool and un expected.

    Amplitude feels like a work of art, visually and audibly. It's a game focused around a crazy narrative about what I think is inducing synesthesia into someone, and have it go horribly wrong. You can tell the amount of work that went into crafting each world and song. It's really cool to see a company like Harmonix release a title like this in a time that most game company's don't want to take risks.

    I can't really complain much for a $20 game, but my minor annoyances are-
    No online multiplayer
    No Remix mode
    A little grindy to unlock songs
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  4. Jan 11, 2016
    8
    My initial thoughts on Amplitude are that it is just straight rad. Totally totally rad! There is no need for any guitar controller, orMy initial thoughts on Amplitude are that it is just straight rad. Totally totally rad! There is no need for any guitar controller, or outrageous price to get your rhythm game fix, as I think that Amplitude owns the single player rhythm genre! This game is much better than it's rhythm rival Guitar Hero Live for single player gameplay.

    The game has a vague sci-fi back story happening that never really gets explained, but it is enough to make you understand what exactly you are doing with your little ship, and is enough to make you care for what is actually going on here.

    Amplitude features intuitive controls with exciting electronica tracks that lead you pulse by pulse through the levels. If you aren't a fan of electronica, however, I might warn you as this game is nothing but electronica. I find it to be perfect for the beat simulator, so that didn't bother me a bit, and I definitely preferred it to random songs that either made no sense, or I had never heard of.

    There are a few cool ship designs, that don't really differ, but add a nice touch. Great mechanics are featured throughout, and the difficulty is perfect from level to level, and progresses nicely.

    The only real downside is that the game is quite short, but for $20 you can't go wrong, and the progressive difficulty allows for a lot of replay-ability, and urges you to master each track and every difficulty.

    If you love Guitar Hero or Rock Band, play this game!

    8.0/10
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  5. Jan 6, 2016
    7
    There was a time when the original Amplitude almost never left my PS2. I was hardcore about finishing all of the tracks on the hardestThere was a time when the original Amplitude almost never left my PS2. I was hardcore about finishing all of the tracks on the hardest difficulty. 100%'ing Robot Rockerz (Komputer Kontroller [aka Kasson Crooker, aka Symbion Project]) on Insane back in the day still makes me smirk - that track wasn't for the meek. That said, having now finished all 15 of the campaign songs on Intermediate difficulty I give the game a solid 7. My biggest issues with the game are:

    The soundtrack is hit-or-miss and since there very little deviation in the types of EDM presented, it all starts to blur together. The original had good remixes of then popular tracks that fit with the futuristic theme and still made sense. For instance, I really enjoyed tracks like Run-DMC, Herbie Hancock, and David Bowie on the original as the mixes fit with the style but helped keep everything from feeling too similar. Even the in-house offerings in the original were more diverse; compare Cooker's DJ HMX 'Cool Baby' track to his later, more difficult tracks in the original. Unfortunately, by the third 'lobe' in this new version, I was pretty tired of the electronic dub, house, and drum-and-bass tracks (and I usually REALLY enjoy EDM). I don't know what MozartBananas is talking about but I do very much "get it" and Harmonix wasn't scared to add tracks outside of EDM back in the original Amplitude and it was better off for it. Go listen to the Crystal Method remix of P.O.D.'s "Boom", one of the first tracks in the original game. It fit the style just fine while offering diversity of songs throughout the game. I get that this game probably didn't have the budget for a bunch of licensed track remixes and that's a bit of a shame, IMO.

    Why do I have to replay the entire campaign instead of being able to select specific lobes and replay them like the original Amplitude did with the beat factory locations? This is a step backward and makes me not want to play campaign again. I can just as easily play the tracks on harder difficulties in quick play. Meanwhile, some of the best songs aren't in the campaign (looking at you, Synthesized 2.0). While the concept album design of the campaign is interesting, there's no compelling reason to do it again as it doesn't change nor does it offer tracks unique to campaign alone.

    The difficulty curve is a bit nutso this time around. I remember moving up from normal to brutal to insane on the original game and feeling challenged but not overwhelmed as I gradually stepped up. This time though, the step up from Intermediate to Advanced is painful. I'd argue that Advanced is almost as hard as Insane was on the original Amplitude, especially given the tracklist and its overuse of 130bpm and higher tracks. There's very little to gradually ease you into the increase.

    And finally: I have now tried on three different TVs and, try as I might I simply cannot get the damn thing synced right. Thankfully the game has a small bit of forgiveness in the timing so it doesn't impede gameplay TOO much (though it's not as forgiving on Advanced or Expert). That said, I still find myself losing streaks because the A/V sync is just a few milliseconds off no matter how I try to calibrate the timing with the in game options.

    Multiplayer is pretty fun but suffers the same limitations due to the tracklist and difficulty curve.

    Overall it's a decent game, solid, but not as solid as the original. I just don't feel the same need to go back and really nail these tracks like I did with the first game due to the issues above.
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  6. Jan 11, 2016
    7
    Good sequel to one of the original Rhythm series. It's a good example of a good Kickstarter game as well. The tracks are pretty weak though. IGood sequel to one of the original Rhythm series. It's a good example of a good Kickstarter game as well. The tracks are pretty weak though. I understand the theme of Dance/Electronica music that permeates the game but the songs are not very good. There are some good songs scattered among the lot but the majority of them are not very good. Plus the ramp up in difficulty will throw some players off. I like that they brought back the series but it's a bit underwhelming for me. Expand
  7. Jan 6, 2016
    5
    Amplitude 2016: It has the gameplay of the original but it's missing all of the spirit and charm. The most important part of a rhythm game isAmplitude 2016: It has the gameplay of the original but it's missing all of the spirit and charm. The most important part of a rhythm game is the soundtrack and this one is a disaster. Nothing but electronica that sounds the same from song to song and the very few exceptions are buried behind grinding the boring songs endlessly. For a company that once went out of their way to find indie acts for their Rock Band catalog, there's no excuse for this joke of a playlist. Just another example of the failure of crowd-funding a game based on nostalgia alone. Save your money, download a PS2 emulator and play the original on your PC. Expand

See all 10 User Reviews