User Score
8.8

Generally favorable reviews- based on 80 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 74 out of 80
  2. Negative: 5 out of 80

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  1. Jun 25, 2013
    10
    10 out ot 10!

    I'm an absolute fan of high quality 2D games. This game delivers in every single aspect: smooth gameplay, breath-taking sprites, sounds etc.

    I almost bought a Wii just to have the oportunity to play this game alone, i'm glad that I have a PSV and can play it now!

    So far, I've played about 6 hours with Momohime and enjoying every single minute of it!
  2. Jun 30, 2013
    10
    I adore this game. i loved it on the wii and I'm thrilled it's now on Vita.

    The game has 2 things that make it magical: its unique 2D art and animation, and a beautifully melodic and high energy soundtrack that pushes you onwards even when the gameplay gets samey.

    The game is very simple go left, right, explore, collect, level up, manage basic resources, get some light mystically
    flavoured storytelling, and mainly fight. You're collecting swords with crazy and inventive special moves throughout the game, and testing them out on all manner of incredibly designed and animated creatures & monsters. Like Okami, the game is inspired by traditional Japanese art and mural painting, and it really does feel like a painting come to life in a video game.

    Very few games have this much charm. I rate it very highly indeed as one of my few keepers this last game generation.
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  3. rih
    Jun 25, 2013
    9
    It's gorgeous. It's fun. This kind of games (triple A quality 2D) are very scarce... If you own a PSV and didn't had the chance to play the original version on the Wii, do yourself a favor: PLAY IT NOW! Review summary: +jaw-dropping beautiful hand-painted 2D sprites +simple, yet astonishing gameplay mechanics +great bosses +very good sound effects and music +great replayability factor
    -lack enemy variety (minor)
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  4. Aug 20, 2013
    9
    Muramasa on the Wii was my first Vanillaware game and I loved it. I played it several years ago, but I only played half of it due to various reasons. This time I played it all the way through and got all 6 endings as well as most of the achievements.

    I'm sure it's been driven into the ground at this point, but I can't help but point out how amazing the artwork and aesthetic is.
    Definitely one of the most beautiful games I've played and the Vita's screen makes it look even better. The music is equally great and when combined with the art style creates an amazing atmosphere that fits the game's setting perfectly.

    The gameplay is fun and never gets old (at least for me), though the areas in the game as well as the standard enemies can get repetitive. I imagine this is a turnoff for some people, but I never minded it. The story is simple but interesting. I would have also liked to see one more sword type in the game to vary up the combat a bit more. The game can be challenging on Chaos mode, and there's always the unlockable Fury mode for those seeking even greater hurdles.

    All in all, this is a beautifully made and fun 2d beat-em-up that can be repetitive for some. If there had been more varied areas and enemies I would have given it a perfect score.
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  5. Aug 25, 2013
    9
    Vanillaware's sublime 2D adventure, Muramasa Rebirth is so much more than a simple HD port of the Nintendo Wii's, fabulous Muramasa: The Demon Blade. Indeed, as far as I am concerned, it is the very finest game to hit Sony's underappreciated Playstation Vita yet, and in the process, represents the very pinnacle of action-RPG gaming in the handheld space.

    Now of course, this potentially
    controversial statement means that if Muramasa has indeed jumped straight to the top of Vita's pecking order, it edges out some truly excellent titles in doing so. Arguably, chief among which, is not only the timeless fan-favourite JRPG, Persona 4 Golden, but even Vanillaware's very own Dragon's Crown too no less. And that is the biggest compliment I can pay this incredible game.

    What with Muramasa Rebirth and the aforementioned Dragon's Crown, Vanillaware are *the* developer to watch right now, and given the Japanese studio's record of combing gorgeous artwork with deep, addictive gameplay, I only hope that they continue to support Sony's handheld in the future. And in the meantime? How about Odin's Sphere on Vita!?
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  6. Mar 3, 2014
    9
    The first thing you'll notice is a breathtaking visualization. When you get used to the gameplay, you'll understand that it's pretty addictive. All the game mechanics are rather simple, but they work well together. The game is advised to any Vita owner.
  7. Feb 16, 2014
    10
    Art is gorgeous. Gameplay is fast, fun and deep. Stories of characters are well written. And game has a LOT of post-game content after you finish both main stories (those took me around 20h), icluding alternative endings.

    Ignore "professional game critics" giving this excellent game score of 78 just because its not AAA title or some smartass wannabe indie fad.

    TL;DR - PLAY IT!
  8. Aug 8, 2013
    9
    Muramasa is excellent game to spend time with on your Vita. It has bright vivid colors, action and a nice soundtrack.

    Do keep in mind that this game does not include English audio, but it does have the required subtitles. Since I mostly play JP- audio anyway this does not bother me and as such did not impact my rating for the game.
  9. Dec 30, 2013
    9
    One of the best 2D games ever !

    I never played the Wii version but i buy a PSV for this game and Persona 4 Golden. And i don't have any regrets !

    It's an awesome game
  10. Jan 25, 2014
    9
    A much-needed port for a game that otherwise would've been restricted to the comparatively small Wii audience, the lush graphics of this side-scrolling action game find a comfortable home on Vita's rich AMOLED screen.

    Gameplay-wise, this game generates an incredible audiovisual experience that is entrancing on its easier modes and engaging as the player raises the difficulty,
    accommodated by a balanced, well-designed combat system that works on a fair punishment and reward system. A lot of things are not entirely clear about some of combat's "fine-print" mechanics, these aren't readily necessary until Fury mode is unlocked (only after a full playthrough on Chaos mode, the harder option), and give enough time for the player to make these discoveries/developments on their own so as to not be a concern. From outset at the tutorial, the combat is also quite simple in learning but requires enough practice and attention to accommodate a large skill range from its playerbase. Certain artistic choices also serve to enhance gameplay effects, such as variable mixes of the background music that fluidly escalate upon entering battle.

    Story-wise, the two characters are fairly well-illustrated. This reviewer has his qualms about the Momohime storyline, although it has its charm in a few well-hidden surprises and developments in its characterbuilding and climax(es; there are three endings to each storyline). The Kisuke storyline stands out as being engaging on an emotional level, as the stakes are well-set and the story paced in its progression. The characters in Kisuke's storyline also felt like they possessed all the right qualities, distinguishing them into a colorful cast and helping them serve as the ideal vehicle to convey their individual struggles and purposes. (Don't worry; this review is spoiler-free) There's a point in the game that you're charging up the snowy mountains in Hida as Kisuke after a pivotal story cutscene, and the combination of multiple factors (the beautifully-illustrated scenery, noticeable increase in fight difficulty, story elements, and the beautiful music that decorates this climb ["Seasonal Beauties" in the soundtrack]) created a strong memory for this reviewer that won't be soon forgotten.

    From the Wii version, a couple subtle things have been improved, the most apparent being Aksys' newly translated script, meant to match the original more closely. Some other tweaks exist, such as an assignable jump button as opposed to relying solely on the d-pad's up button to jump, but it may not be enough to justify a new purchase from any owners of the Wii version, exceptions being avid fans or anyone wanting access to the new partially-released DLC episodes (which are quite reasonably priced; $4.99 at time of posting on PSN, mere weeks after the first episode's release). The game is quite accurately a "rebirth," straying far from a complete reincarnation or redevelop.
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Metascore
78

Generally favorable reviews - based on 25 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 20 out of 25
  2. Negative: 0 out of 25
  1. Nov 27, 2013
    85
    This small Vanillaware pearl is a must have not only for its spectacular graphics, but also for a well crafted gameplay, scratched only by too lengthy and boring backtracking phases.
  2. Nov 13, 2013
    70
    Muramasa Rebirth is gorgeous, action packed, and regularly delightful, but its charm cannot entirely compensate for its repetitive nature.
  3. Oct 23, 2013
    80
    Muramasa Rebirth is a showcase for what visuals the PS Vita can produce. It does have solid gameplay, but lacks enough variation to be an absolute must have purchase. There is fun to be had for sure though and would be a solid introduction to the genre thanks to the simple to use mechanics that take plenty of mastering.