Cabela's African Safari Image
Metascore
53

Mixed or average reviews - based on 4 Critics What's this?

User Score
5.1

Mixed or average reviews- based on 7 Ratings

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  • Summary: Players discover Africa's untamed wild as they hunt a variety of African big game in pursuit of the ultimate hunting challenge – the feared Big Five – leopards, lions, elephants, rhinos and Cape buffalo. In Cabela’s African Safari, players choose from seven, 10 or 14 day safaris including open safari, game tracking, baiting and herd hunting missions. The game features over 30 exotic species of animals including sable, kudu, gemsbok, eland, waterbuck, impala and much more, as well as all new African waterfowl and upland bird hunting. Cabela's African Safari also features an unlockable Big Five Trophy level where gamers can experience the world’s most dangerous animals at their fiercest. Hunters also have access to an arsenal of authentic firearms including big caliber weapons they will need to bring down charging rhinos and thundering elephants. In addition, all-new shooting controls and features including Adrenaline Mode, Hunter Sense and Shot Cam, allow gamers to hone in on their prey with more accuracy and ease. [Activision] Collapse
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 0 out of 4
  2. Negative: 1 out of 4
  1. While surely not for everyone from just the title and subject matter alone, Cabela’s African Safari does serve up some decent gaming for a cheapy title focused on shooting something other than a human.
  2. The game's underpowered scopes and wonky ballistics are often exasperating--long shots are tough, and point blank encounters sometimes are even tougher. [Feb. 2007, p.80]
  3. 50
    While the campy nature of African Safari is good for a few laughs, they are at the game's own expense. Hunting fans will have to wait yet again for the next -- and first -- great hunting game.
  4. In the end, gamers are all just a bunch of people sitting in front of a television holding a controller, so simulation games must be judged on their ability to make gamers feel like they're performing an action within the limitations of the technology. Cabela's African Safari's poor controls, design choices, and graphics keep this immersion from ever happening.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 5
  2. Negative: 1 out of 5