User Score
7.0

Mixed or average reviews- based on 28 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 13 out of 28
  2. Negative: 4 out of 28
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  1. Jul 5, 2011
    9
    One of the most under-appreciated current generation games, Eat Lead is an intelligent satire of the gaming landscape from the mid 1980's onward. While it brings only an average-length single player shooter to the table, and graphics that fall short of the expectations laid out there by big-budget, triple-A 'Hollywood' titles, it asks for less money in return. It invokes the indie spiritOne of the most under-appreciated current generation games, Eat Lead is an intelligent satire of the gaming landscape from the mid 1980's onward. While it brings only an average-length single player shooter to the table, and graphics that fall short of the expectations laid out there by big-budget, triple-A 'Hollywood' titles, it asks for less money in return. It invokes the indie spirit of lovably ballsy bargain-bin titles like Serious Sam and relies on clever writing to paint a humorous, violent picture onto the bare canvas of standard, cover-system shooting mechanics, while tweaking those mechanics with a few nice little innovations of its own, such as the ability to aim at your next desired bit of cover and tap a button to sprint towards it, a feature later used to widespread acclaim in Splinter Cell: Conviction. Also, while the game was made for Xbox 360 and PS3, much of the game's humor is derived from the same Apogee and id software games I first cut my gaming teeth on. Eat Lead loves many of the same games I love, and while the game is full of cutting jabs, there is vein of sportiness that runs through the whole thing. It's not insulting other games, it's roasting them, much like your best buddies will do to you at a bar. So if you're looking for a few fun-filled evenings at a low price, grab a beer and hang out with Matt. Expand
  2. Dave
    Jul 24, 2009
    8
    Eat Lead has to be one of the most funniest and fun games i have played in awhile. I have played over 150 + games on Xbox 360 and this is one that i tell my friends they must try. Its cheap, fun and funny as H3ll! It does get repetitive after a few levels but the humour kept me wanting more and more. I dont think any game as of late has brought the unique game feel that this game brings. Eat Lead has to be one of the most funniest and fun games i have played in awhile. I have played over 150 + games on Xbox 360 and this is one that i tell my friends they must try. Its cheap, fun and funny as H3ll! It does get repetitive after a few levels but the humour kept me wanting more and more. I dont think any game as of late has brought the unique game feel that this game brings. It has many different gameplay features that most games should have or people want in a game. One lever you are third person shooting, the next level Interactive NIS's are playing. I think that if this game had some sort of online feature people would have played it more. Expand
Metascore
53

Mixed or average reviews - based on 53 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 53
  2. Negative: 16 out of 53
  1. 52
    The story isn't there, the gameplay is tedious, and there's nothing visually exciting about this one. There are a few laughs here and there and some Achievement padding, but this has "bargain bin" written all over it.
  2. 70
    Matt Hazard is not a great game. It falls victim to a lot of the cliches that it pokes fun at and Matt Hazard doesn't have the star appeal of a Duke Nukem or a Marcus Fenix. It doesn't take the spoof thing far enough--they totally waste the voice over talents of the awesome Will Arnett--and the action needs three more coats of polish but it definitely has its moments. Despite its faults, I more or less enjoyed it.
  3. A bad shooter with worse excuses, and there’s little chance you’ll enjoy playing it as much as Vicious Cycle enjoyed making it. The developers relied too heavily on cheap laughs, and didn’t take advantage of the satire nearly as much as they should have. Instead, they used it as a crutch, explaining missing features and other problems on the game’s premise – an excuse that grows thin quickly, as far too often, it’s used to the detriment of the player instead of to their benefit.