• Publisher: Ubisoft
  • Release Date: Nov 13, 2012
Metascore
72

Mixed or average reviews - based on 5 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 5
  2. Negative: 0 out of 5

There are no positive critic reviews yet.

User Score
tbd

No user score yet- Awaiting 3 more ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 1
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 1
  3. Negative: 0 out of 1
  1. Nov 27, 2012
    8
    I have played a few of Ubisoft's dance games such as various Just Dance titles and the Michael Jackson Experience. I found the Just Dance games to be aimed at the youth, while Michael Jackson was almost too difficult, but the lag made the latter odd and you could swing one arm to get a Perfect on some moves. When I heard about The Hip-Hop Dance Experience, I was excited since hip-hop dance is my favorite style, but I expected it to be a lot easier than its competitor, Dance Central.

    As soon as I started it, I was quite pleased. I'll start with the actual in-song gameplay. Not only do you see the person that you have to mirror, but you also see the back of the person that you create & customize in the Wardrobe mode. That means you get to see both perspectives of the moves at the same time, which is something I find really convenient since I tend to have alternating preferences. For every song, there is also its music video creatively placed into the background of whatever venue you're playing in, and it looks nice! Another perk is that the flash cards for the next moves are animated instead of stationary with highlighted body parts and arrows. For me, that makes it easier to get the moves right if it is my first time seeing them, even if they are complex. Aside from just regular dance, there's marathon, power skooling (practice), and battle. I actually haven't played battle yet, so I have no comments for that yet. Marathon is a great workout, because you play songs endlessly with just a tiny break in between each one. You start out with a life meter that restores itself slightly after every completed song. Once your life meter completely depletes, it's over.

    Power skooling is the practice mode, but it's where I immediately compare it to Dance Central, since I played that first. When you choose a song, you see the animated move for each song and have the ability to choose one to master. Now, while you do get to practice each song as long as you want, normal or slow tempo, it can become annoying to constantly put your arm at an angle to change the move when you're ready to go on. This is where it could be argued that flowing like the Dance Central practice mode may be more convenient, but at the same time, you sacrifice doing each move infinite times without an extra step.

    In conclusion, this game's moves are surprisingly difficult (on hard; medium is no easy feat either), and it's a great satisfaction, especially if you are into this kind of music. The challenge is definitely on par with that of Dance Central. Even if you are a dancer trying to find more awesome choreography to master, but not familiar with this genre, you will not be disappointed. If this game had voice commands I would probably give it a 8.5. The new Dance Central 3 is virtually 85% voice commands which makes for easy navigation. Going from that to this takes away from my patience a bit, but it's still fun. It also lacks variety in modes aside from the obvious... no unique mode that makes you go wow. Not even some sort of story or career mode.

    Nonetheless, GREAT game.
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