User Score
8.7

Universal acclaim- based on 89 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 78 out of 89
  2. Negative: 4 out of 89
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  1. Sep 13, 2010
    6
    The fall & rise of Anthony (Tony) H. Wilson & his part in Manchester's cultural uprisings.
    It looked a lot of fun to make but I found it a bit too self-indulgent.
    Steve Coogan does tend to be more like Alan Partridge than Wilson although there are some similarities. The Joy Division bits seem a bit lame now, especially if you've watched the fantastic Control. Great performances by Danny
    The fall & rise of Anthony (Tony) H. Wilson & his part in Manchester's cultural uprisings.
    It looked a lot of fun to make but I found it a bit too self-indulgent.
    Steve Coogan does tend to be more like Alan Partridge than Wilson although there are some similarities.
    The Joy Division bits seem a bit lame now, especially if you've watched the fantastic Control.
    Great performances by Danny Cunningham as Shaun Ryder & Andy Serkis as Martin Hannett though.
    Expand
  2. MarcD.
    Aug 31, 2002
    6
    Responding to Jason D.'s comment, as a casual fan of Joy Division, New Order, and the Sex Pistols, but with no other real interest in the Manchester scene, I enjoyed the movie as a movie, but it tails off pretty dramatically in its second hour. Steve Coogan is entertaining throughout, though.
  3. RickJ.G.
    Aug 22, 2002
    6
    Could have been a lot better. The movie covers such a broad sweep of the history of the Manchester scene, a decade-and-a-half, that it can hardly do it justice in only about 2 hours. It would take a trilogy to give the viewer a sense of the sweep of history the movie covers. Instead what we get is a snippet here and a snipet of there of the most important dates in the history of Factory Could have been a lot better. The movie covers such a broad sweep of the history of the Manchester scene, a decade-and-a-half, that it can hardly do it justice in only about 2 hours. It would take a trilogy to give the viewer a sense of the sweep of history the movie covers. Instead what we get is a snippet here and a snipet of there of the most important dates in the history of Factory Records and the Hacienda. Steve Coogan is very good as Tony Wilson, but I didn't care much for the dialog he was given. Foreshadowing in a movie is a useful and SUBTLE device filmakers can use to tip off the viewer as to what is going to happen later in the film. I didn't care much for stopping the film so Coogan can tell us what is going to happen to the various characters around him, or that a certain outake not included in the movie may end up on the DVD version. This is supposed to be amusing I guess, but I wanted to relive the history the movie deals with. Meanwhile, we end up not learning all that much about anybody around Tony Wilson. In this sense, 24 Hour Party People comes across as an in-joke that might be inaccessible to people who are not familiar with any of the bands or the Manchester scene at all. I can only mildly recommend it to people who are fans of any of the bands featured (or not featured) in the movie. Expand
Metascore
85

Universal acclaim - based on 29 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 29 out of 29
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 29
  3. Negative: 0 out of 29
  1. Extravagant and funny it is, and also quite dark at times.
  2. An insider nostalgia trip for graying art punks. It could have been called ''When We Were Cool,'' and it's finally so cool that it freezes you out.
  3. 89
    Loud, hilarious, and enormously entertaining, 24 Hour Party People makes you want to toss current FM radio out on its pre-fab, corporate-sponsored backside. And not a moment too soon.