Metascore
57

Mixed or average reviews - based on 42 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 22 out of 42
  2. Negative: 3 out of 42
  1. Reviewed by: Lawrence Toppman
    Jan 26, 2012
    88
    Most movies about people passing themselves off as the opposite sex can't sustain the illusion, but "Nobbs" does.
User Score
6.2

Generally favorable reviews- based on 49 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 14
  2. Negative: 3 out of 14
  1. Jan 28, 2012
    9
    Albert Nobbs is the most heartbreaking and touching film I have seen in years. I disagree with much of what some critics are saying - I was never ever bored, found the drama tense and compelling, subtly building a sense of dread about what might be about to happen. The scene on the beach - Albert's one moment of true freedom, brought tears. Glenn Close is the master of this drama, not Janet McTeer, as some are saying. To me she simply added some comic relief, and was, at most, a cartoon. See it, you will love it. Full Review »
  2. Dec 7, 2012
    5
    Let me begin by saying I really enjoyed the film a lot. Glenn Close and Janet McTeer are fantastic as women living double lives as men; I'm very happy that they received Oscar nominations last year because they delivered two of the finest performances of 2011. Albert Nobbs does have some major issues however, but it's worth mentioning that it's hard to determine what could have made it better. The biggest problem I had with the film was that it was not as powerful or emotionally resonant as it could/should have been. I also didn't think Mia Wasikowska and Aaron Johnson were that great which surprised me because they're rising stars. Overall though I think Albert Nobbs is worth the watch; the characters are touching and the lead performances are remarkable. Full Review »
  3. Sep 22, 2012
    7
    An otherwise indifferent film is made memorable with yet another career defining performance by Glenn Close. And even though the subject is interesting and the supporting cast also do an excellent job, the film never really becomes truly great. Full Review »