User Score
8.4

Universal acclaim- based on 347 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 6 out of 347
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  1. Aug 1, 2012
    10
    11/10 would watch again.
    It's funny, I seriously just love watching people die. It legitimately turns me on, at least a bit. Good, good, good movie...
  2. Nov 28, 2012
    9
    Featuring some of Christian Bale's greatest work, and some priceless juxtapositions of horror and humor, "American Psycho" remains a hysterically written piece of satire.
  3. Jan 12, 2014
    10
    One of the best and most underrated movies of all time IMHO. Its smart , funny and gory with deep dark undertones about the paradoxical times we live in
  4. Jun 4, 2014
    10
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. This is a very intriguing movie. We get to watch as Patrick Bateman's sanity slowly slips away to his uncontrollable nightly blood lust. However, we find out that he may be delusional, and not necessarily dangerous. I still can't decide whether he is crazy or a serial killer. Expand
  5. Jan 20, 2012
    9
    American Psycho is one of the most deranged yet enjoyable stories ever committed to film. A satire of the "yuppie" lifestyle of the 1980s, and a warning against the corrupting power of money, it's expertly told, well-scripted, somewhat disturbingly funny, and grusomely thrilling. The entire film pretty much hinges on one performance, that of Christian Bale's increasingly disturbed WallAmerican Psycho is one of the most deranged yet enjoyable stories ever committed to film. A satire of the "yuppie" lifestyle of the 1980s, and a warning against the corrupting power of money, it's expertly told, well-scripted, somewhat disturbingly funny, and grusomely thrilling. The entire film pretty much hinges on one performance, that of Christian Bale's increasingly disturbed Wall Street trader-by-day and serial killer-by-night Patrick Bateman. Bale doesn't disappoint, delivering the performance of his career, and in the process creating a horror villain to rival Norman Bates, and an anti-hero and chillingly disturbing narrator to rival Alex DeLarge. Comparissons to such films as Psycho and A Clockwork Orange are inevitable, and American Psycho could be seen as an affectionate tribute to both, but with its own ideas to add to the bubbling cauldron of depravity. All these films use madness as a metaphor for something wrong with society - in Psycho it's misogyny, in A Clockwork Orange it's the corruption of government, and in American Psycho it's the evils of capitalism. The films are similar in many ways, amd vastly different in others, but all three communicate a powerful message to their audience extremely effectively. American Psycho certainly deserves equal recognition as a film - the performances are just as good, the story just as engaging, the underlying themes just as dark and compelling. Even director Mary Harron shows great flair in her art, though sadly as a cult film director she is unlikely to be classed in the same league as so-called "masters" as **** and Kubrick. If you enjoy the film, cult icon as it is, then feel free to be smug in the fact that you and a select group of others appreciate a truly fine, though criminally underrated film. Expand
  6. Jun 8, 2014
    9
    Without a shadow of a doubt one of the most underrated movies I have ever had the privilege of watching. Christian Bale plays the role so well and the story is full of clever plot points and surprises throughout. Why this film got such mixed reviews upon release is beyond me, it's so well made. Thankfully with age this film has seen it's fan base and popularity grow and rightly so, thisWithout a shadow of a doubt one of the most underrated movies I have ever had the privilege of watching. Christian Bale plays the role so well and the story is full of clever plot points and surprises throughout. Why this film got such mixed reviews upon release is beyond me, it's so well made. Thankfully with age this film has seen it's fan base and popularity grow and rightly so, this film is so worth watching! Expand
  7. Sep 2, 2014
    9
    This is one of my favorite films of all time. It's extremely well-acted, and I love the 80's vibe of the film. It's quite an interesting take on the slasher film with our main character, portrayed quite darkly by Christian Bale. "American Psycho" is a very interesting (and even sometimes funny) look into the mind of a serial killer, and it's a very intense and enjoyable film. I give it myThis is one of my favorite films of all time. It's extremely well-acted, and I love the 80's vibe of the film. It's quite an interesting take on the slasher film with our main character, portrayed quite darkly by Christian Bale. "American Psycho" is a very interesting (and even sometimes funny) look into the mind of a serial killer, and it's a very intense and enjoyable film. I give it my highest recommendation. Expand
  8. Aug 7, 2011
    9
    Satiric and socially relevant. A film not for the faint of heart. Filled with violence but with a purpose. Christian Bale creates an interesting performance. A must see, well stylized dark comedy with a lot to say. Soon to be a modern classic, and certainly deserving of its cult following.
  9. Apr 16, 2015
    10
    Wow just wow amazing movie hilarious and quotable i never get tired of it and Bales performance is mind blowing and this happens to be my favorite movie ever
  10. Apr 19, 2015
    10
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. Published in 1991, Bret Easton Ellis' third novel was greeted by howls of hatred more appropriate to a small war in the Third World or another Golan-Globus Lemon Popsicle sequel. A first person report from inside the mind of Patrick Bateman, who epitomises the ills of the 1980s by combining the professions of Wall Street broker ("mergers and acquisitions") and serial killer ("murders and executions"), the book was widely misinterpreted as a hideously misogynist tract that used explicit violence to draw attention to a thinly-plotted pretend thriller with dollops of surface-level satire.

    There has always been the threat of a film, with such scary names as Oliver Stone, Brian De Palma and David Cronenberg in the ring - but the project has fallen to Mary Harron, the ex-BBC documentarian who made an underrated debut with I Shot Andy Warhol, who has cannily brought aboard the apparently unlikely Guinevere Turner (the lesbian icon from Go Fish) to co-write and play the funniest victim. The result is the best imaginable film of very difficult material; it doesn't say much more than, "The 80s were **** but manages exactly to catch the all-surfaces, dazzlingly obsessive tone of the novel, making its points by treating all subjects - nouvelle cuisine, MOR rock music, fitness kicks, clothes, personal grooming - with exactly the same pornographic attention to detail as the sex and violence.

    Like the book, the film makes a point of not having a real plot: a smooth PI (Dafoe) seems set to nail the killer for the murder of a rival trader (Leto), but fades into the wallpaper along with the crime itself. Bateman, played with dead-inside charm and mounting hysteria by an astonishing Christian Bale, invites us into his world of reservations at exclusive restaurants and competitions over the quality of business cards. His detours into murder - prefaced by detailed speeches about now-embarrassing musical enthusiasms ("You actually own a Whitney Houston CD?" gasps Turner through contemptuous laughter. "More than one?") - are hardly more bizarre and tasteless as everything else in his life. In the end, the scariest thing about Bateman is not that he's a Lecter-like freak - his crack-up in the last act brings him horribly closer to humanity - but that he is no worse than everyone else in his world, except humane-but-dim office minion Sevigny, whose role is to make the film bearable.

    As for the horror: Harron is mostly very discreet, but delivers one terrific apartment-of-grue sequence as Bateman's life falls to pieces along with many victims, featuring a truly nerve-shredding chainsaw sound effect.

    Often laugh-out-loud funny, conveying the cruelty of its world through persistent mistakings of identity among the well-scrubbed young men and details like the all-sharp-edges interior decor and elaborate but tiny meals, it's cool in the sense of remote rather than hip. And you wouldn't want to be seen dead with the soundtrack album.
    Expand
  11. Apr 19, 2015
    10
    A New York stock broker spends his evenings killing people, or does he?

    Like the book, the film makes a point of not having a real plot: a smooth PI (Dafoe) seems set to nail the killer for the murder of a rival trader (Leto), but fades into the wallpaper along with the crime itself. Bateman, played with dead-inside charm and mounting hysteria by an astonishing Christian Bale, invites
    A New York stock broker spends his evenings killing people, or does he?

    Like the book, the film makes a point of not having a real plot: a smooth PI (Dafoe) seems set to nail the killer for the murder of a rival trader (Leto), but fades into the wallpaper along with the crime itself. Bateman, played with dead-inside charm and mounting hysteria by an astonishing Christian Bale, invites us into his world of reservations at exclusive restaurants and competitions over the quality of business cards. His detours into murder - prefaced by detailed speeches about now-embarrassing musical enthusiasms ("You actually own a Whitney Houston CD?" gasps Turner through contemptuous laughter. "More than one?") - are hardly more bizarre and tasteless as everything else in his life. In the end, the scariest thing about Bateman is not that he's a Lecter-like freak - his crack-up in the last act brings him horribly closer to humanity - but that he is no worse than everyone else in his world, except humane-but-dim office minion Sevigny, whose role is to make the film bearable.

    Often laugh-out-loud funny, conveying the cruelty of its world through persistent mistakings of identity among the well-scrubbed young men and details like the all-sharp-edges interior decor and elaborate but tiny meals, it's cool in the sense of remote rather than hip. Also a brilliant soundtrack album. One of the best films ever!
    Expand
  12. Apr 21, 2015
    10
    A New York stock broker spends his evenings killing people, or does he?

    Watching "American Psycho" is like witnessing a bravura sleight-of-hand feat. In adapting Bret Easton Ellis's turgid, gory 1991 novel to the screen, the director Mary Harron has boiled a bloated stew of brand names and butchery into a lean and mean horror comedy classic. The transformation is so surprising that when
    A New York stock broker spends his evenings killing people, or does he?

    Watching "American Psycho" is like witnessing a bravura sleight-of-hand feat. In adapting Bret Easton Ellis's turgid, gory 1991 novel to the screen, the director Mary Harron has boiled a bloated stew of brand names and butchery into a lean and mean horror comedy classic. The transformation is so surprising that when the movie's over, it feels as if you've just seen a magician pull a dancing rabbit out of a top hat.

    At the heart of the film is a star-making performance by the handsome Welsh actor Christian Bale (adopting an impeccably snooty pseudo-preppie American accent) that softens the novel's portrait of a serial-killing Wall Street hotshot just enough to force us to identify with this ultimate narcissist. Mr. Bale's portrayal of 27-year-old Patrick Bateman, a budding master of the universe by day (he works in mergers and acquisitions, which he facetiously refers to as "murders and executions") and homicidal maniac by night, is alternately funny, blood-curdling and pathetic.

    From the opening credits, in which drops of blood are confused with red berry sauce drizzled on an exquisitely arranged plate of nouvelle cuisine, the movie establishes its insidious balance of humor and aestheticized gore. That sly confusion between the beautiful and the gruesome extends to the language of the screenplay by Ms. Harron and Guinevere Turner.

    As brilliantly as the movie's visual style evokes a world spat out by a Vanity Fair art director, "American Psycho" remains a one-joke satire of materialism and soullessness. It's a joke we would like to think we've got. Having arrived safely in the year 2000, it would be easy to shrug off "American Psycho" as the last cinematic word on an embarrassingly gluttonous cultural moment that has gone the way of Patrick's favorite murderous background anthem, "Hip to Be Square." But has it?

    A very twisted and dark comedy. One of my personal favorites. Flawless!
    Expand
  13. Dec 27, 2012
    9
    Despite being a bit confusing especially the end, the characters in it were brilliant and Christian Bale acted brilliantly. The subtle jokes were the best and the satirical undertones were great.
  14. May 10, 2011
    10
    Based on the book of the same name, American Psycho is a journey through the mind of a mentally deranged yuppie. While that makes it seem like a very serious movie it's actually very funny in a dark sense. Christian Bale is delightful as the main character Patrick Bateman.
  15. Nov 8, 2012
    10
    American Psycho is brilliant social satire cleverly dressed up as a slasher film. I love it! A masterwork.
  16. Jul 13, 2014
    10
    American Psycho has a terrific plot, acting and is a satire of the lifestyle of those who lived in the 1980's.
    The movie is absorbing and intricate which is great to see. The movie also has great comedy provided
    by Christian Bale. Bale put so many facets into his character that it would take a while to list them
    all, one of my favourite thrillers, A+.
  17. Feb 3, 2012
    10
    To be honest I never thought Christian Bale was that incredible as an actor... until I saw this movie, and I was blown away. What a an amazing performance, being able to create a character so deep but completely shallow at the same time. It's like Dexter, but 10 times more insane, satirical and absolutely terrifying.
Metascore
64

Generally favorable reviews - based on 35 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 22 out of 35
  2. Negative: 5 out of 35
  1. 71
    The film's details are spot-on, its tone ludicrously ironic, and its casting deft.
  2. Reviewed by: Jay Carr
    50
    In both senses of the word, American Psycho wastes its women.
  3. 80
    Bateman could have been much more interesting if he'd been played by someone who wouldn't need to work quite so hard (Charlie Sheen or Rob Lowe might have been fascinating here).