Metascore
50

Mixed or average reviews - based on 32 Critics What's this?

User Score
7.1

Generally favorable reviews- based on 23 Ratings

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  • Starring: , , ,
  • Summary: An Ivy-League educated writer (Wayans) joins a comedy show at a major network. The show includes an all black cast, but is written by mostly white people. One of his first ideas is to have a skit where the cast wears "black face," and the show becomes an instant smash.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 32
  2. Negative: 6 out of 32
  1. 100
    Lee's incendiary and brilliant new film.
  2. It's a unique blend of history and hysteria, and there's no escaping the dead-serious ideas that run beneath its flamboyant surface.
  3. Spike Lee has grabbed a tiger by the tail in his scabrously risky new comedy, Bamboozled. The wonder is how long he succeeds in hanging on.
  4. Reviewed by: Emanuel Levy
    50
    Occasionally biting but excessively melodramatic.
  5. 50
    Angry, potentially offensive movie.
  6. 50
    Primary story line is clumsy and badly acted. But he (Lee) reminds you that movies have power, that they matter, and for a few brilliant moments, Bamboozled matters more than any other American movie this year.
  7. Angry, fitfully provocative mess.

See all 32 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 13
  2. Negative: 3 out of 13
  1. Apr 11, 2011
    2
    In this depiction of race and race relations, the white man is still in power and is only interested in exploiting black people and assuming black culture. The white TV writers and bosses are stupid, insensitive, and racists who love racist material. This is, of course, a racist presentation of white people. On the other side, you've got essentially two kinds of black people. Authentic blacks who are part of the resistance, and the sellouts. You can tell which ones are the sellouts because they wear/perform blackface and get shot to death by the authentic resistors. The whole thing is unbelievably blunt, simplistic, and thoughtless exploration of race, power, and the history of racism in America. I suspect many will presume there is some kind of enlightened message buried deep within the satire that emerges with enough searching and pressure, but there's really no excuse for the kind of 2-D typecast representations of whiteness and what Lee sees as modern day uncle toms who play along. It's a crap way of telling stories, and it's a crap way of looking at life too for that matter. Looking at people and seeing only objects is, after all, kind of what started this whole race mess in the beginning. Expand

See all 13 User Reviews

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