User Score
8.4

Universal acclaim- based on 16 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 15 out of 16
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 16
  3. Negative: 1 out of 16
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  1. JayH
    Apr 15, 2009
    8
    A sensitive, beautiful and remarkable film. The cinematography is particularly excellent. The performances are exceptional. It's a film not easy to forget, fascinating from start to finish.
  2. RafaelJ
    Dec 25, 2007
    10
    Mahid Mahidi has another film"children from heaven that is just as good as "The color of paradise" and this one. He has 3 other that are not in this part of the world.
  3. EricS.
    Dec 19, 2005
    10
    As you watch the movie, ask yourself what guides Lateef. Is it a possible desire for romance, as some have suggested; is it also extreme guilt, longing for penitence, protectiveness toward the opposite sex, sympathy, and, finally, respect for the value of human life? Does it start with a few of these feelings, and then lead to progressively more? Why is the movie called "Baran," when it As you watch the movie, ask yourself what guides Lateef. Is it a possible desire for romance, as some have suggested; is it also extreme guilt, longing for penitence, protectiveness toward the opposite sex, sympathy, and, finally, respect for the value of human life? Does it start with a few of these feelings, and then lead to progressively more? Why is the movie called "Baran," when it appears to be much more about the moral growth of Lateef? Could it be that Lateef's devotion is to Baran, ultimately the "rain" that cleanses his soul? Expand
  4. PatriciaD.
    Feb 9, 2005
    10
    A different movie, full of emotion and melancoli.
  5. ChadS.
    Sep 9, 2002
    9
    They don't serve tea at a Ken Loach worksite. In "Baran", the girl Baran masquerades as a boy; not too successfully but she passes muster with the largely Iranian housebuilders, who tolerate, but don't truly see the Afghani labor amongst them. But Lateef discovers Baran's not-THAT-guarded secret and falls in love with her. At first, we think Lateef is shy, but then it dawns They don't serve tea at a Ken Loach worksite. In "Baran", the girl Baran masquerades as a boy; not too successfully but she passes muster with the largely Iranian housebuilders, who tolerate, but don't truly see the Afghani labor amongst them. But Lateef discovers Baran's not-THAT-guarded secret and falls in love with her. At first, we think Lateef is shy, but then it dawns on us that it's Baran's background which keeps him from pursuing her heart. At first, "Baran" is sort of like the Iranian "Riff-Raff", but then it turns into a meditation on how politics prevent love from being requited. When Lateef leaves the construction site, Majid Majidi and his d.p. unleash a multitude of memorable images. In the stunning final scene, Baran does something to demonstrate that she's not a victim of Lateef's thousand-yard stare. Baran feels the same way too. And the final shot, is a powerful one, that sends you out of the theater happy. Go Greek if you must, then go east young man(or woman), go east. Expand
  6. RezaG.M.
    Jan 14, 2002
    8
    It's not Majidi's best film! have you seen "God's Color"?
  7. NimaJ.
    Jan 13, 2002
    10
    loved it! Iranian cinema is starting to become appealing for the first time :)
Metascore
79

Generally favorable reviews - based on 25 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 24 out of 25
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 25
  3. Negative: 1 out of 25
  1. 70
    If the performances are the prime reason the film is as engaging as it is, it must also be said that Majidi's visual style seems far more sophisticated than in "Children of Heaven."
  2. Can and should be appreciated as a work of delicate and unmistakable beauty.
  3. The lovely clarity of this story, which seems to have been drawn from the literature of an earlier age, is well served by the artful subtlety of the telling. Mr. Majidi prefers imagery to exposition, and his shots are as dense with meaning, and as readily accessible, as Dutch paintings.