Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures | Release Date: December 25, 2008
5.2
USER SCORE
Mixed or average reviews based on 126 Ratings
USER RATING DISTRIBUTION
Positive:
56
Mixed:
28
Negative:
42
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4
ChadS.Dec 27, 2008
Marty Feldman died in 1982 at the age of 49. "Bedtime Stories" pays homage to the bug-eyed comic actor by displacing Feldman's signature feature onto a guinea pig. This lame, alleged comedy shares with Darren Aronofsky's Marty Feldman died in 1982 at the age of 49. "Bedtime Stories" pays homage to the bug-eyed comic actor by displacing Feldman's signature feature onto a guinea pig. This lame, alleged comedy shares with Darren Aronofsky's misunderstood "The Fountain", a diegesis informed by the laws of Buddhism, as evidenced by the rodent with Marty Feldman eyes. Reincarnation( the recycling of souls) is an eastern belief that finds puerile expression in "Bedtime Stories", when Skeeter Bronson(Adam Sandler) and the people from his current life appear together, over and over again, across different epochs in time. The same story, boy proves his love for girl through the performance of a heroic deed, gets recycled for its timelessness. Regardless of genre, the story works. "Bedtime Stories" posits storytelling as Buddhist in nature, after all, each story has been told before in some other form. It has structural similarities: a formula. People are recycled. Plots are recycled. "Bedtime Stories" performs an alchemy on the imagination by recasting Buddhism as an avenging god who killed all the Greek muses. If this commingling of disciplines(religion and the arts) had an origin story, a bedtime story, ahem, it would have film theorist Robin Wood writing his article on genre theory("Ideology, Genre, Auteur") under a bodhi tree. In one scene, "Bedtime Stories" seems to refute Christianity as the film practices its religion by recycling Paul Thomas Anderson's frogs in "Magnolia". This time it's gumballs; this time it's not a miracle. The gumball sequence shows how every miracle can be undermined by a logical explanation. While the film challenges the hegemony of the dominant ideology, it doesn't change the fact that the story itself is tired and worn out, you know, recycled. Maybe god is a truly original screenplay. Maybe god doesn't exist. Expand
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5
JayHApr 2, 2009
Imaginative, as well as disappointing. They could have done a lot more with the story. Adam Sandler displays his usual inane not very funny style of humor. Some good effects, expectantly fine production from Disney. Overall, it's fair.
0 of 1 users found this helpful
6
ryancarroll88Aug 27, 2010
A surprisingly fun and imaginative family film. The overused "divorced mom" sideplot was a unnecessary and the ending was somewhat bland, but Adam Sandler was really fun to watch throughout (wow, did I really just say that?), and the blendingA surprisingly fun and imaginative family film. The overused "divorced mom" sideplot was a unnecessary and the ending was somewhat bland, but Adam Sandler was really fun to watch throughout (wow, did I really just say that?), and the blending of fantasy and reality was shockingly restrained, and all the better for that. Expand
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