Metascore
78

Generally favorable reviews - based on 47 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 42 out of 47
  2. Negative: 1 out of 47
  1. Reviewed by: Peter Bradshaw
    Sep 26, 2013
    100
    After all those false dawns, non-comebacks and semi-successful Euro jeux d'esprit, Allen has produced an outstanding movie, immensely satisfying and absorbing, and set squarely on American turf: that is, partly in San Francisco and partly in New York.
  2. Reviewed by: Simon Braund
    Sep 23, 2013
    100
    Allen’s best film in years, astute, humane and shot through with keen observations on the state of the world. It may also, in its pondering the price of deceit and the pain of rebuilding a life from nothing, count as broad social allegory.
  3. Reviewed by: Steve Persall
    Aug 19, 2013
    100
    Blue Jasmine is Allen's 44th movie in 47 years, an amazing run with storied highs and notorious lows along the way. This one ranks among his finest dramas, his best since "Match Point."
  4. Reviewed by: Mick LaSalle
    Aug 3, 2013
    100
    Blanchett in Blue Jasmine is beyond brilliant, beyond analysis. This is jaw-dropping work, what we go to the movies hoping to see, and we do. Every few years.
  5. Reviewed by: Joe Morgenstern
    Jul 25, 2013
    100
    Cate Blanchett tops anything she's done in the past with her portrait of a fallen woman who's a hoot, a horror, a heartbreaker and a wonder. The mystery of the movie as a whole is that it depicts a bleak world of pervasive rapacity, deceit and self-delusion, yet keeps us rapt with delight.
  6. Reviewed by: Manohla Dargis
    Jul 25, 2013
    100
    [Allen's] most sustained, satisfying and resonant film since “Match Point.”
  7. Reviewed by: Owen Gleiberman
    Jul 24, 2013
    100
    The movie is rich with class tension, and if Allen nails the moods of the wealthy, he also gets surprising, dynamic performances from Hawkins, Cannavale, and Andrew Dice Clay as the folks who have no money but may have a fuller sense of what life is.
  8. Reviewed by: Rex Reed
    Jul 23, 2013
    100
    Richly chronicled characters, sharp dialogue and that stupendous centerpiece performance by Cate Blanchett are contributing factors in the best summer movie of 2013 and one of the most memorable Woody Allen movies ever.
  9. Reviewed by: Joshua Rothkopf
    Jul 21, 2013
    100
    It’s real Streetcar Named Desire territory as the fights pile up, and if you think that doesn’t sound entertaining, know that it is, in a hypnotically catastrophic way.
  10. Reviewed by: Marc Mohan
    Aug 8, 2013
    91
    Even the finest troupe of thespians would be wasted without Allen's guiding hand as writer and director. But Blue Jasmine, which might rank among Allen's 10 best films, shows what can happen when it all comes together.
  11. Reviewed by: Rene Rodriguez
    Aug 8, 2013
    88
    Blue Jasmine, which is easily Allen’s best and most powerful movie since 2005’s "Match Point", is filled with terrific performances, including Hawkins as the sweet-natured Ginger.
  12. Reviewed by: Richard Roeper
    Aug 5, 2013
    88
    Woody is still capable of writing and directing one of the liveliest, funniest and sharpest movies of the year.
  13. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    Jul 25, 2013
    88
    It's one of the year's finest, most complex portrayals, in one of Allen's best films in years.
  14. Reviewed by: Peter Travers
    Jul 25, 2013
    88
    Want to see great acting, from comic to tragic and every electrifying stop in between? See Cate Blanchett in Blue Jasmine.
  15. Reviewed by: David Ehrlich
    Jul 22, 2013
    85
    When Allen conceives of a character this great, it’s hard not to wish for him to slow down and maybe write that extra draft to refine his creation, but Blanchett – at once both repellant and eminently relatable – uses the casual tone to her advantage, the same way that monster movies use miniatures for scale.
  16. Reviewed by: Ben Kenigsberg
    Jul 24, 2013
    83
    Unlikely as it may seem, though, Blue Jasmine finds Allen charting bona fide new territory.
  17. Reviewed by: Eric Kohn
    Jul 19, 2013
    83
    Blue Jasmine belongs to Blanchett, who appears in almost every scene and frees it from the limitations of Allen's style, pushing it to far sharper results than any of the more traditional movies, good and bad, that he's churned out in the past dozen or so years.
  18. Reviewed by: Rodrigo Perez
    Jul 18, 2013
    83
    It’s part raw and ugly character study, part ensemble comedy, but it’s that first element that is so striking, bold and unnerving, while the latter element is sometimes amusing, but familiar.
  19. Reviewed by: Tim Robey
    Oct 4, 2013
    80
    Allen’s ambitions with this taut, tart character study might not be stratospheric, but they’re at least moderate-to-high, and his degree of success is exciting.
  20. Reviewed by: Jamie Graham
    Sep 26, 2013
    80
    The one-liners are in evidence but this is more abrasive than you might expect. Blends rigour and vigour to join "Vicky Cristina Barcelona" and "Midnight In Paris" as the best of late-period Woody.
  21. Reviewed by: Dave Calhoun
    Sep 18, 2013
    80
    One of the most pleasing things about Blue Jasmine is that it feels truly knotty and never obvious in how it unfolds.
  22. Reviewed by: Bill Goodykoontz
    Aug 1, 2013
    80
    It’s Allen’s best film in years, an authentic-feeling deconstruction of a life. It isn’t always easy to watch. It isn’t exactly fun (although parts are funny). Blanchett’s performance sometimes overpowers the story. But it’s an essential work in Allen’s later canon.
  23. Reviewed by: Betsy Sharkey
    Jul 25, 2013
    80
    The movie is among the filmmaker's most emotionally affecting.
  24. Reviewed by: Joe Neumaier
    Jul 25, 2013
    80
    The way she (Blanchette) anchors this superb dramedy is a thing of beauty.
  25. Reviewed by: Keith Phipps
    Jul 25, 2013
    80
    For all the memorable dialogue and elegant camerawork (courtesy of Javier Aguirresarobe), it’s Blanchett’s movie, and her performance tells yet another story, that of a woman losing control.
  26. Reviewed by: David Denby
    Jul 22, 2013
    80
    Cate Blanchett, who played Blanche on Broadway only a few years ago, gives the most complicated and demanding performance of her movie career. The actress, like her character, is out on a limb much of the time, but there’s humor in Blanchett’s work, and a touch of self-mockery as well as an eloquent sadness.
  27. Reviewed by: Todd McCarthy
    Jul 18, 2013
    80
    Although marred by a couple of too-convenient plot contrivances, this often humorous drama lands firmly in the plus column among the Woodman's recent works.
  28. Reviewed by: Justin Chang
    Jul 18, 2013
    80
    Blanchett’s performance is so dominant in terms of screentime and emotional impact that the film succeeds as not only a virtuoso ensemble piece, but also an unflinchingly intimate study of the character in the title.
  29. Reviewed by: Marjorie Baumgarten
    Aug 7, 2013
    78
    The saga unfolds in a fairly charming fashion, and only Allen’s abrupt ending breaks the spell. Clearly, the filmmaker has no more ideas than Jasmine about how to resolve her predicament.
  30. Reviewed by: James Berardinelli
    Aug 9, 2013
    75
    Blue Jasmine is an exercise in examining the lead character's mental degeneration. The end result, a performance-driven character study, offers an experience more akin to what one might expect from the late John Cassavetes than from the still very much alive Woody Allen.
  31. Reviewed by: Ty Burr
    Aug 9, 2013
    75
    Jasmine is a creation to stand with this filmmaker’s best, but Blanchett makes it better. She finds the grace notes in a disgraceful woman and leaves us stranded between horror and pity.
  32. Reviewed by: Steven Rea
    Aug 8, 2013
    75
    The scene when she's (Blanchette) babysitting Ginger's boys and takes them to a diner - and confides about her electric shock treatments ("Edison's medicine"), her breakdowns, about the side effects of Prozac and Lithium . . .. it's genius.
  33. Reviewed by: Joe Williams
    Aug 8, 2013
    75
    As the wife to a wolf of Wall Street, Blanchett shows us a lost sheep both before and after the slaughter. It’s not a pretty picture, but it’s twitching with life.
  34. Reviewed by: Geoff Pevere
    Aug 1, 2013
    75
    Woody Allen’s first Stateside production in nearly a decade is a sharply observed, post-economic crash comedy-drama that boasts a formidable performance by Cate Blanchett and addresses such pertinent real-world concerns as class, gender and corporate criminality in urban America.
  35. Reviewed by: Ann Hornaday
    Aug 1, 2013
    75
    Blue Jasmine may not be a comeback in any aesthetic or professional sense, but it nevertheless feels like Allen has come back: to the psychic space and collective anxieties of the country of his birth and a real world that, for a while there, he seemed to have left behind.
  36. Reviewed by: Lou Lumenick
    Jul 26, 2013
    75
    Blue Jasmine may sound like a topical satire, but it isn’t really. It’s a character study of an obnoxious, selfish and supremely self-absorbed woman oblivious to the pain she inflicts on others.
  37. Reviewed by: Susan Wloszczyna
    Jul 26, 2013
    75
    A good Woody Allen flick is a thing of joy these days and, at times, Blue Jasmine is even a great one, close to being an equal to 2005's "Match Point."
  38. Reviewed by: Peter Rainer
    Jul 26, 2013
    75
    Allen is content to have Jasmine, babbling to herself, waft into a psychoneurotic, Antonioni-esque haze that seems preordained by her class and her predicament. Her cry for help, if you wipe away all the artifice, resembles nothing so much as a plea for her charge cards to be reinstated.
  39. Reviewed by: Ella Taylor
    Jul 26, 2013
    75
    As written, Jasmine is a hopeless neurotic, trapped in a perpetual panic. As played, she has a wicked hint of Scarlett O'Hara.
  40. 70
    It’s amazing how skilled he (Allen) is in making his old ideas seem fresh, lively, even urgent. His new drama Blue ­Jasmine comes this close to being a wheeze. But he sells it beautifully.
  41. Reviewed by: Roger Moore
    Jul 22, 2013
    63
    The reason to fall into Blue Jasmine is Blanchett’s cagey, broken turn.
  42. Reviewed by: Nick McCarthy
    Jul 21, 2013
    63
    One of Woody Allen's strongest and most pointed films in over a decade despite mildly falling victim to his recent propensity for clunky narrative development, cynicism, and stereotypical characterizations.
  43. Reviewed by: Dana Stevens
    Jul 25, 2013
    50
    Jasmine attains the paradoxical state of being fascinatingly tiresome. The same pair of words might be used to describe Blue Jasmine, which, whether you like it or not, surely counts as one of Allen’s more unexpected films of the past decade
  44. Reviewed by: Richard Corliss
    Jul 25, 2013
    50
    Blue Jasmine is the 77-year-old auteur’s first flat-out non-comedy in a quarter century — since "Another Woman" and "September" in the late ’80s, and back to "Interiors" in 1978. Like those more somber studies, this is a portrait of a woman in extremis. But a view from afar: Allen observes Jasmine’s allure and disease without penetrating her soul. That makes for a movie that is both intimate and disinterested, as if Jasmine were a flailing insect in a barren terrarium.
  45. Reviewed by: Andrew O'Hehir
    Jul 25, 2013
    50
    The whole experience of watching casts of talented and over-eager actors try to make sense of his (Allen) nonsensical scripts becomes increasingly strained and bizarre. I’ve felt that way about recent Allen movies I mostly enjoyed, like “Midnight in Paris” and “Vicky Cristina Barcelona,” and it goes double or triple for Blue Jasmine.
  46. Reviewed by: Mike Scott
    Aug 23, 2013
    40
    It's that end -- the film's final sobering five minutes -- in which Blue Jasmine is at its most effective. Credit is due there to Blanchett's table-setting performance in it and in the hour and half preceding it. It's also due to the courage Allen displays as a storyteller in ending this particular story in the way it has to end.
  47. Reviewed by: Stephanie Zacharek
    Jul 23, 2013
    30
    Blue Jasmine is so relentlessly clueless about the ways real human beings live, and so eager to make the same points about human nature that Allen has made dozens of times before, that it seems like a movie beamed from another planet.
User Score
7.7

Generally favorable reviews- based on 222 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 44 out of 61
  2. Negative: 12 out of 61
  1. Sep 5, 2013
    3
    I am a long-time Woody Allen fan and consider myself a minor aficionado of his work, but I am at a loss as to what he was intending by making a film about a person who is mentally ill and whose life is coming apart--again and again--because of her inability to have a relationship with the truth. Glib jazz played over tragic emotional breakdowns did not elicit amusement in me or my partner. We were deeply disappointed and somewhat disturbed. Okay, quite disturbed. I give it a 3 instead of 1 because there are some excellent performances. Too bad they are for naught. Full Review »
  2. Aug 6, 2013
    5
    People are just afraid to truly rate a Woody's film, because they're afraid of his name.
    Well, I don't think the well chewed subject looked
    any more appealing in this film. A tiring, slow paced, and predictable drama that scored above 40 only because Blanchett's acting was so good.
    I can't believe people said it's "Arguably Woody Allen's best film" when it's not even one of his top ten... baah
    Full Review »
  3. Sep 3, 2013
    2
    The movie is well done, however it is not enjoyable. Very few of the characters are likable, and seeing Jasmine's character have one mental breakdown after another becomes tiresome. The film is so bleak it becomes difficult to watch. I was ready to walk out when the film finally ended. This should not be listed as a comedy. Full Review »