Brave

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7.3

Generally favorable reviews- based on 669 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 45 out of 669

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User Reviews

  1. Apr 30, 2016
    6
    I remember I was not fussed on seeing 'Brave', it has nothing to do with the fact that it's the first Pixar movie to feature a female lead...looking at the story, it just didn't seem that interesting.

    We meet a young princess named Merida (voiced by Kelly MacDonald) growing up to become a professional at archery. She has a good aim, and her mother, Elinor (Emma Thompson) is very close
    I remember I was not fussed on seeing 'Brave', it has nothing to do with the fact that it's the first Pixar movie to feature a female lead...looking at the story, it just didn't seem that interesting.

    We meet a young princess named Merida (voiced by Kelly MacDonald) growing up to become a professional at archery. She has a good aim, and her mother, Elinor (Emma Thompson) is very close with her, they have a healthy mother and daughter relationship as you would expect. As Merida grows older, she also has three younger brother triplets who like to misbehave and cause drama. It seems that Merida's parents are planning on findin her a prince, as most princesses need to get married to a prince.

    Merida doesn't want this, it seems, as it's not the life she feels she wants to live. But her mother insists that she lives the life of a traditional princess.

    Merida runs away after having an argument with her mother, and she comes across some strange magic that could potentially bring her what she wants, little does she know that the magic is, of course, flawed, and it becomes a mission for her to try and change things back.

    While the animation in this movie looks fantastic, as to be expected from Pixar, it seems that the story gets a little rushed towards the second half. There is also something about the character Merida that may seem a little...underwhelming. To me, she is not a very interesting character, and she is almost not very memorable at all, she doesn't need to sing Disney musical numbers to make her interesting, it's just, there is nothing about her character that makes her an impact, other than the fact that she is the first Pixar female lead.

    'Brave' doesn't stand tall in terms of its story or characters...it is ultimately weak tea. There is almost no emotional charge when clearly there should be. It gets points for trying, but when the plot does really get going, you cannot help but think, there could have been a much better way to execute this mother and daughter story.

    All in all, 'Brave' is mostly forgettable Pixar fare...children are likely to enjoy it depending on their patience, but if you're looking for the next 'Toy Story' (1995) or 'Finding Nemo' (2003)...this is not the one you're looking for.
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  2. Mar 20, 2016
    9
    Brave is an absolutely delightful and moving experience with fantastic voice acting and Pixar’s trademark across the board. From the emotionally stirring love letter to moms to the beautiful animation, Brave brings the very best of what the animation giant has to offer. Kelly Macdonald, Emma Thompson, and Billy Connolly, are all brilliant here and really bring their animated characters toBrave is an absolutely delightful and moving experience with fantastic voice acting and Pixar’s trademark across the board. From the emotionally stirring love letter to moms to the beautiful animation, Brave brings the very best of what the animation giant has to offer. Kelly Macdonald, Emma Thompson, and Billy Connolly, are all brilliant here and really bring their animated characters to life. The writing from the various screenwriters is pitch perfect. From great dialogue to great characterization to a great story, Brave’s script is all that I can ask for from a film. Additionally, the film is well paced and even when it establishes its story, Brave never slows down and keeps you entertained throughout. Finally, the music is phenomenal, especially the song "Learn Me Right". Fantastic stuff. Overall, I loved the fairy tale feel here and the moral is fantastic: love and respect your mom, she would do anything for you. Brave basically had me in tears and is not hard to figure out why. Expand
  3. Mar 20, 2016
    8
    Yea, this film doesn't walk to the bests Pixar's films,for his simple animation and unremarkable characters. Fortunately, it has enjoyable story-telling and brings a great plot with a familiar message. Fans will not be disappointed with this film, anyway. Enjoy!
  4. Mar 6, 2016
    5
    Pxar's Brave conveys the plight of young Princess Merida (voiced by Kelly Macdonald), a girl who seemingly has it all: loving parents, great hair, mad archery skills, and enviable beauty. But she still desperately wants to “change her fate,” a goal which becomes her mantra—her fate presently being one in which she marries the son of one of her father's allies, following tradition ratherPxar's Brave conveys the plight of young Princess Merida (voiced by Kelly Macdonald), a girl who seemingly has it all: loving parents, great hair, mad archery skills, and enviable beauty. But she still desperately wants to “change her fate,” a goal which becomes her mantra—her fate presently being one in which she marries the son of one of her father's allies, following tradition rather than her heart. Merida is plucky and rebellious, more Katniss than Bella, and when she discovers that the only requirement for participation in the tournament which will decide her future husband is being the firstborn of one of the kingdom's leaders, she enters the tournament herself in an attempt to control her own future.

    Merida's mother, Queen Elinor (Emma Thompson), is mortified: What will the neighbors think? The film establishes Elinor as the main roadblock to Merida's happiness, suffocating her daughter with convention when Merida would rather be climbing mountains, hunting monsters—doing any number of things that don't involve marrying one of the buffoons she's presented with at the tournament. She becomes increasingly desperate to escape this fate, and doesn't hesitate to enlist the help of a witch on her quest for freedom. She asks the witch to supply a spell that will “change” her mother, presumably supplanting her conservative view of Merida's future—a plan which, of course, backfires disastrously.

    Merida's father, King Fergus (Billy Connolly), is known as the Bear King, having lost his leg in a battle with a gigantic bear in the film's opening scene, so it's a cruel irony that the result of Merida's ill-advised spell, purchased from the witch, is Elinor's transformation into a near likeness of her husband's trophy from that fateful battle. The history of fairy tales is full of bears; a popular Scottish fairy tale—and Brave indeed takes place in medieval Scotland—tells of a girl marrying a handsome prince who, during the light of day, is cursed to take the form of a bear, until he endures five years of trials to break free. But the curse Merida brings upon her mother is more permanent: The two women have two days to figure out how to break the spell or Elinor will remain a bear forever, giving in to a savage nature which bubbles beneath the surface throughout the film as she tries to keep hold of her humanity—and keep herself from eating her daughter.

    It's no accident that the film's voice of tradition is the one transformed into a savage beast. Brave is very much a story of a pretty girl getting what she wants, and Merida keeps her beauty and her wits while her mother, helplessly clumsy in her new form, scarfs down live fish straight from the river and tries without success to conceal her unavoidable nudity. Even Elinor's redemptive speech to the kingdom about the right to marry for love is in fact delivered by Merida, who intuits the words based on messages conveyed by her mother's gesticulating paws; the old ways have been literally silenced, with no thought as to why they existed in the first place. The only lesson Merida learns is that she should be more careful in her dealings with witches.

    Brave flirts with actual commentary on the plight of women and responsibility (a girl fighting for her own hand in marriage is an interesting possibility with a lot of weight), as well as on the struggle for balance in relationships between mothers and daughters. But ultimately the film offers nothing more than a caricature of a well-worn conceit (a princess doesn't fit into her shiny box, so she just breaks all the rules and does what she wants), neatly repackaged for another generation of young moviegoers who haven't met Princess Jasmine from Aladdin and don't realize that they're eating yesterday's leftovers.
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  5. Jan 18, 2016
    8
    I get it. Some people have problems with Pixar during this movie, but 2012 was an improvement for Pixar ever since Cars 2 turned down on all Pixar fans out there... but who really cares? Brave proves that Pixar doesn't give up at all.
  6. Jan 17, 2016
    10
    Brave is a 2012 animated comedy-fantasy film directed by Mark Andrews and Brenda Chapman.It is the 13th Pixar film,and certainly a great one as their previous.
    Brave follows Merida the daughter of Scottish King Fergus and Queen Elinor.She is a skilled archer who wants to make her own fate in life and pursue her own dreams.She is then forced to get married,as the tradition requires at a
    Brave is a 2012 animated comedy-fantasy film directed by Mark Andrews and Brenda Chapman.It is the 13th Pixar film,and certainly a great one as their previous.
    Brave follows Merida the daughter of Scottish King Fergus and Queen Elinor.She is a skilled archer who wants to make her own fate in life and pursue her own dreams.She is then forced to get married,as the tradition requires at a certain age but she is in her own mind and seeks help from a witch to change the fate and be her own person in life.
    This movie is amazing,from the glorious animation to the characters who are likable just as much as they are interesting.Merida is a strong female lead character who chooses her own path in life and makes her own decisions for herself.She has dreams and most importantly is "brave" enough to pursue them till the very end.She's also smart and Kelly Macdonald's voice work just helps the cause with her amazing Scottish Accent.
    The story is very interesting and intriguing while still being emotional that gives depth to the characters.But it also has funny moments throughout,even though the finale is very dark and also even sad which in my opinion is great.
    People has been complaining about the twist over and over again and how it is more of a kids film than for adults,which Pixar is used to making.But I disagree because while it is an absolute treat for kids,it is also dark at times,it has adult jokes here and there and what's very important,it has character development at its finest.The place where Merida and different characters in the movie are at the beginning and where they end up is just brilliant and life changing.The lessons they learn through their adventures,them being good or bad,and the way that this movie teaches people that we can make our own fate if we are brave enough to follow our hearts,that makes for an unforgettable experience.
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  7. Jan 6, 2016
    5
    At first glance, Brave seems much like an old-fashioned animated Disney princess film done using new-fangled technology. Most of the elements are in place: the plucky heroine, the faithful animal companion, a mysterious wizard, and a character-building journey. There are even a few songs. Looking deeper, however, there's something missing: narrative momentum. The thinly-written storylineAt first glance, Brave seems much like an old-fashioned animated Disney princess film done using new-fangled technology. Most of the elements are in place: the plucky heroine, the faithful animal companion, a mysterious wizard, and a character-building journey. There are even a few songs. Looking deeper, however, there's something missing: narrative momentum. The thinly-written storyline takes us on an adventure, to be sure, but not necessarily one viewers will be interested in taking. The tone is uneven and more often morose than joyful. The pacing is slow and at times almost tedious. The end result is something that feels like it was put together from a jumble of Disney clichés tacked onto the skeleton of Beauty and the Beast.

    The lack of both a romantic element and a real villain is only part of the problem. Another issue is that the lead character, the wild, arrow-shooting, red-headed Princess Merida (voiced by Kelly Macdonald) is more of a brat than a spunky, strong-willed girl. Okay, there's a fine line but, for the most part, Disney has managed to stay on the right side of it. Watching Merida, the only thing I could think is that her parents indulged her too much. As the movie progresses, we see that's true of her blustering father, King Fergus (Billy Connolly), who lets her get away with just about anything. Her mother, Queen Elinor (Emma Thompson), tries to lay down the law but ends up being turned into a bear for her troubles. The spoiled Merida, not liking to be constrained by Mom's rules (especially the one about marrying a prince), finds a witch and obtains magic that, when applied, results in Elinor becoming bear-able. The rest of the movie is spent trying to reverse the spell before Big Game Hunter Fergus inadvertently kills his wife.

    Something sad has happened within Pixar. With Brave as a lackluster follow-up to the misfire of Cars 2, they seem to be spinning their wheels. Gone is the magic they infused in great films like The Incredibles, Finding Nemo, WALL*E, and the Toy Storys. Gone are the days when movie-lovers of all ages could celebrate the release of a new Pixar feature. They have fallen back to the pack, and maybe even slipped a little behind. Even Brave's staunchest defenders will grudgingly admit that this is "lesser Pixar." Artistically, despite its catalog of flaws, Brave is superior to Madagascar 3, but kids will prefer the latter for its color, its spectacle, and its cheerfulness. Curiously, Brave is neither fish nor fowl. It lacks a strong appeal to kids (too slow, too dark, too long) and adults (too superficial, not well written). The "Disney" and "Pixar" names assure an audience but it's hard to imagine Brave generating a lot of enthusiasm. Its final numbers will likely be closer to those of Cars 2 than Up.

    Choosing the voice actors appears to have been easy: find everyone in the industry with SAG credentials who can boast either a genuine Scottish accent or a decent facsimile. So there's Kelly Macdonald, Craig Ferguson, Billy Connolly, Kevin McKidd, and Robbie Coltrane. Emma Thompson trades in her upper class British dialect for something more earthy. One assumes that if James Doohan was still alive, he would have been offered a part. It's tempting to give Pixar points for authenticity, although during the time period when this transpires, the language spoken by the people of Scotland would have been unrecognizable to today's audiences, requiring subtitles.

    Brave features one of the most potentially frightening sequences in any recent animated film. This is partially responsible for the PG (instead of G) rating. Two bears - the transformed Elinor and a bigger, badder monster - go at it in an ursa smackdown that is surprisingly graphic for a family feature. Older kids won't be bothered; they may even applaud this scene (especially since it's one of only a few action-oriented segments). Younger children, however, may be frightened. It's not just the degree to which violence is depicted but the overall intensity of the sequence. It will likely be less scary on a TV, but on a big screen, some children may find it overwhelming.

    Early in its genesis, Brave was being touted as "the first animated film directed by a woman." That woman, Brenda Chapman, didn't make it all the way through the production, being replaced by Mark Andrews part-way through due to "creative differences." Maybe that in part explains Brave's meandering approach and tone. Chapman, who is still credited as both a co-director and a co-writer, previously worked on the story for 1991's Beauty and the Beast and appears to have used pieces of that film as an inspiration here. The climax, in fact, is almost a direct steal (with Mom standing in for Prince Charming). In the end, Brave could have used a little of the Beauty and the Beast magic.

    Brave is preceded by the charming Pixar short, "La Luna," which is ultimately more worth the price of admission than the feature.
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  8. Jan 4, 2016
    5
    Poor Brenda Chapman.

    For a while she held the significant distinction of being the first female director to be admitted into Pixar’s hitherto all-male cadre of feature filmmakers. Not only that, but the film she was charged with bringing into being was Pixar’s first to have a female protagonist, and a princess to boot. The sound of glass ceilings shattering in Tinseltown might not
    Poor Brenda Chapman.

    For a while she held the significant distinction of being the first female director to be admitted into Pixar’s hitherto all-male cadre of feature filmmakers.

    Not only that, but the film she was charged with bringing into being was Pixar’s first to have a female protagonist, and a princess to boot. The sound of glass ceilings shattering in Tinseltown might not have been audible, but it was hard to miss all the same.

    Until, that is, Chapman was abruptly ousted and replaced by Mark Andrews, second-unit director on Mouse House mega-flop John Carter . Feminist breakthrough? Yeah, not so much. “Creative differences” was the catch-all reason given for Chapman’s departure from the project.

    Yet when one harks back to how this slice of Celtic cod-folklore was initially pitched, it’s clear John Lasseter and the rest of Pixar’s top brass lost faith in her initial conception - then called The Bear And The Bow - and re-moulded it into something a little less serious, a little more cartoonish and a lot less… well, princess-y.

    In many ways the result resembles nothing so much as Tangled , or 2010 pic How To Train Your Dragon , another medieval caper set in a world of chieftains, warriors and Arthurian accessories.

    Given that critically acclaimed release represents one of DreamWorks’ better toon forays, the parallel would appear to do Brave proud. Yet Pixar’s history has always been one of pack-leading innovation, not familiar (if unintentional) imitation.

    Coming off the back of that spluttering jalopy Cars 2 , the newest vehicle off the Emeryville production line had been looked upon as a film to steady the Pixar ship. Instead it bears all the hallmarks of a studio treading water, as if waiting for a new generation of custodians to propel it into its next evolutionary stage.

    Which is not to say that Brave isn’t technically ambitious, fabulous to look at and fun to be around, mostly thanks to a spirited and feisty heroine whose explosion of reddish curls is a triumph in itself.

    OK, so tomboy Merida (nimbly voiced by Kelly Macdonald) does feel something of an amalgam, saddled as she is with Mulan’s independent streak, Jessie the Cowgirl’s pluck and the archery prowess of Katniss Everdeen.

    Boldly though, this is one Disney princess who refuses to be defined by a Prince Charming, for all her mother’s attempts to set her up with one in the interests of Highland tribal harmony.

    Voiced by Emma Thompson, the stately Queen Elinor fills much the same role as Marlin in Finding Nemo : namely, overprotective parental buzz-kill forever trying to keep their mischievous offspring in check. (As well as Merida, she and the burly King Fergus - the easiest of paydays for Billy Connolly - have a trio of unruly boy triplets wreaking havoc in their castle.)

    It’s evident from the off, then, that much of Brave ’s drama will be driven by its stern mother/headstrong daughter dynamic, and the friction therein. But how this dynamic develops hangs on a bonkers plot twist that’s so off the wall and out of left field it almost capsizes the entire movie.

    We won’t reveal more, apart from saying that it involves a spell cast by a mad witch that in turn maintains a tradition of literal transformation that’s been part of the Disney ethos since as far back as Pinocchio .

    The problem is that the Pixar USP is rooted in the fantastical rather than the magical. Their movies, by and large, involve one key idea – talking toys, culinary rodents, suburban superheroes – treated as a fanciful embellishment of an otherwise authentic milieu.

    Throw witchcraft into the mix and suddenly anything goes, undermining the strict internal logic on which the Pixar universe depends.

    Brave begins strongly, has some fine comic moments and builds to a majestic finale involving a demon bear named Mor’du who once robbed Fergus of a leg and won’t stop until it gets the rest of him. (There’s also a terrific traditional score from Patrick Doyle.)

    Yet its weak points (Julie Walters’ eccentric enchantress, the gaseous Will o’ the Wisps that entice Merida to her cottage and the consequences of the fate-changing pastry she coaxes out of her) all spring from a tinkering with the Pixar fabric that is false, forced and ultimately foolhardy.

    Speaking of fabric, a symbolically torn tapestry comes to play a crucial role in proceedings. Here’s hoping John Lasseter has a needle and thread capable of stitching his animation power-house across its current creative blip.

    More lukewarm haggis than piping-hot broth, Pixar’s 13th feature might fall short, but is still head and hair-covered shoulders above most of its CG competitors.
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  9. Dec 5, 2015
    7
    "Brave " is a fresh, fun and colorful history , which from the beginning have to be brave at all, as I we showed in this great Pixar movie, It is demostred.
  10. Sep 13, 2015
    8
    I really like Merida, I think she's one of the best princesses of Disney. Although the story is simple, it's nice to enjoy in family, and it makes you think about your relation with your mother hahhah.
  11. Jul 29, 2015
    7
    3/5★ Beautifully animated and with contemporary themes (despite its mediaeval settings) Brave is a fun film, even a good film, but it is not up to Pixar standards. This is not a film I will remember or quote or see listed in "Greatest films of all time" list. Pixar films are adept at getting their message across without being preachy and Brave, while I appreciate its themes of female3/5★ Beautifully animated and with contemporary themes (despite its mediaeval settings) Brave is a fun film, even a good film, but it is not up to Pixar standards. This is not a film I will remember or quote or see listed in "Greatest films of all time" list. Pixar films are adept at getting their message across without being preachy and Brave, while I appreciate its themes of female empowerment and choosing ones destiny, is uncharacteristically unsubtle.
    The biggest twist of Brave is not the mother turning into a bear, but with the twist of no happily ever after ending with her handsome prince for a Disney princess. It went with the theme of the film but I kept on expecting a romance with a peasant boy to be the surprise. Disney has ruined me.
    Verdict: Enjoy it as a Disney film, don't expect a Pixar.
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  12. Apr 24, 2015
    5
    At first glance, Brave seems much like an old-fashioned animated Disney princess film done using new-fangled technology. Most of the elements are in place: the plucky heroine, the faithful animal companion, a mysterious wizard, and a character-building journey. There are even a few songs. Looking deeper, however, there's something missing: narrative momentum. The thinly-written storylineAt first glance, Brave seems much like an old-fashioned animated Disney princess film done using new-fangled technology. Most of the elements are in place: the plucky heroine, the faithful animal companion, a mysterious wizard, and a character-building journey. There are even a few songs. Looking deeper, however, there's something missing: narrative momentum. The thinly-written storyline takes us on an adventure, to be sure, but not necessarily one viewers will be interested in taking. The tone is uneven and more often morose than joyful. The pacing is slow and at times almost tedious. The end result is something that feels like it was put together from a jumble of Disney clichés tacked onto the skeleton of Beauty and the Beast.

    The lack of both a romantic element and a real villain is only part of the problem. Another issue is that the lead character, the wild, arrow-shooting, red-headed Princess Merida (voiced by Kelly Macdonald) is more of a brat than a spunky, strong-willed girl. Okay, there's a fine line but, for the most part, Disney has managed to stay on the right side of it. Watching Merida, the only thing I could think is that her parents indulged her too much. As the movie progresses, we see that's true of her blustering father, King Fergus (Billy Connolly), who lets her get away with just about anything. Her mother, Queen Elinor (Emma Thompson), tries to lay down the law but ends up being turned into a bear for her troubles. The spoiled Merida, not liking to be constrained by Mom's rules (especially the one about marrying a prince), finds a witch and obtains magic that, when applied, results in Elinor becoming bear-able. The rest of the movie is spent trying to reverse the spell before Big Game Hunter Fergus inadvertently kills his wife.

    Something sad has happened within Pixar. With Brave as a lackluster follow-up to the misfire of Cars 2, they seem to be spinning their wheels. Gone is the magic they infused in great films like The Incredibles, Finding Nemo, WALL*E, and the Toy Storys. Gone are the days when movie-lovers of all ages could celebrate the release of a new Pixar feature. They have fallen back to the pack, and maybe even slipped a little behind. Even Brave's staunchest defenders will grudgingly admit that this is "lesser Pixar." Artistically, despite its catalog of flaws, Brave is superior to Madagascar 3, but kids will prefer the latter for its color, its spectacle, and its cheerfulness. Curiously, Brave is neither fish nor fowl. It lacks a strong appeal to kids (too slow, too dark, too long) and adults (too superficial, not well written). The "Disney" and "Pixar" names assure an audience but it's hard to imagine Brave generating a lot of enthusiasm. Its final numbers will likely be closer to those of Cars 2 than Up.

    With computer animated films circa 2012, it's almost pointless to talk about the "look." Ten or fifteen years ago, we marveled at the level of subtlety and detail in movie like this. Now, the playing field is level. Nearly all animated films - whether from Fox, Pixar, Dreamworks, Warner Brothers, or someone else - boast the same polished appearance. Brave uses a dark pallet but it appears neither better nor worse than Madagascar 3 or The Lorax. (Time to insert my obligatory 3-D verdict: don't bother. Not the greatest - it dims an already dark movie and there is blur during scenes where there's a lot of movement.)

    Early in its genesis, Brave was being touted as "the first animated film directed by a woman." That woman, Brenda Chapman, didn't make it all the way through the production, being replaced by Mark Andrews part-way through due to "creative differences." Maybe that in part explains Brave's meandering approach and tone. Chapman, who is still credited as both a co-director and a co-writer, previously worked on the story for 1991's Beauty and the Beast and appears to have used pieces of that film as an inspiration here. The climax, in fact, is almost a direct steal (with Mom standing in for Prince Charming). In the end, Brave could have used a little of the Beauty and the Beast magic.

    Brave is preceded by the charming Pixar short, "La Luna," which is ultimately more worth the price of admission than the feature.
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  13. Apr 11, 2015
    8
    brave is not the best Pixar film but no the worst (cars 2) but it's still pretty good. the charters are pretty good Maria is a pretty good charter but why is Pixar made a princess Disney film.
  14. Apr 1, 2015
    7
    Besides killing off an hour and a half, 'Brave' doesn't really have much to offer. It is watchable, also funny to a certain degree, relatively entertaining but certainly not the blockbuster Pixar work that we are used to. The plot is rather simple, without any strong originality or depth, although one must praise the shift of focus - the analysis of the mother-daughter relationship is notBesides killing off an hour and a half, 'Brave' doesn't really have much to offer. It is watchable, also funny to a certain degree, relatively entertaining but certainly not the blockbuster Pixar work that we are used to. The plot is rather simple, without any strong originality or depth, although one must praise the shift of focus - the analysis of the mother-daughter relationship is not common for Pixar. The animation is repetitive and I must admit that the bears did, and very strongly I might add, remind me of 'Brother Bear', which is a flaw in my book. The comical moments were rather dull and predictable and if it wasn't for Billy Connolly and the three babies this segment would've been a perfect plot. A big praise, though, goes to the cinematographers as the scenery is truly impressive.

    All in all, 'Brave' is certainly not bad, as someone might deduce from my earlier writing, but a 7/10 grade for a Pixar animated movie is just weak. You should watch it, not to say otherwise, but it shouldn't be a priority and you certainly shouldn't except much afar from the always charming and exotic Scottish fairytale.
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  15. Mar 12, 2015
    7
    The film has some emotional push and pull, but often feels a tad predictable and confined in terms of story. It opens with some nice dilation between scenes of nicely done mother-daughter drama and scenes marvelously chaotic slapstick and action, which had me interested, but the film didn't leave me totally satisfied as previous Pixar works have.

    I'd say the visuals were stunning, and
    The film has some emotional push and pull, but often feels a tad predictable and confined in terms of story. It opens with some nice dilation between scenes of nicely done mother-daughter drama and scenes marvelously chaotic slapstick and action, which had me interested, but the film didn't leave me totally satisfied as previous Pixar works have.

    I'd say the visuals were stunning, and the heroine was well-designed as opposed to most of what we see from studios like Dreamworks (no disrespect intended), and the scenery was lovely. I only wish that there had been a little bit more to it in terms of story.
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  16. Dec 23, 2014
    7
    Disney rarely fails with their films, and "Brave" -- a beautifully animated, mostly funny and intelligently scripted motion picture -- proves that.

    7.5/10.
  17. Oct 19, 2014
    8
    Brave follows the heroic journey of Merida, a skilled archer and headstrong daughter of King Fergus and Queen Elinor. Determined to change her fate, Merida defies an age-old custom sacred to the unruly and uproarious lords of the land: massive, surly Lord Macintosh and cantankerous Lord Dingwall, unleashing chaos in the kingdom. When she turns to an eccentric Witch, she is granted anBrave follows the heroic journey of Merida, a skilled archer and headstrong daughter of King Fergus and Queen Elinor. Determined to change her fate, Merida defies an age-old custom sacred to the unruly and uproarious lords of the land: massive, surly Lord Macintosh and cantankerous Lord Dingwall, unleashing chaos in the kingdom. When she turns to an eccentric Witch, she is granted an ill-fated wish and the ensuing peril forces Merida to harness all of her resources—including her mischievous triplet brothers—to undo a beastly curse and discover the meaning of true bravery. Expand
  18. Oct 13, 2014
    6
    It's just okay, the story is alright but nothing new or original. I do like the idea of a more manly female protagonist instead of just the typical Disney princess that people are quite use to, the other characters are also pretty interesting and like able. Although some parts do drag on a bit and can get boring. Overall Brave is okay, a step up from Cars 2, but not by much.
  19. Oct 8, 2014
    4
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. Just NO. Uninspired. Mother turning into a bear...Come on -.-'' Teenage drama and not a good one. I just wish thy thought a little bit more abut it, it could have been some much better. It's a shame. Expand
  20. Aug 18, 2014
    10
    Honestly I don't understand how this got such a low score. Compared to Frozen (which somehow, mindblowingly, has a HIGHER score...what the **** this is a masterpiece. I have very little in terms of bad to say about this movie. I love the music.... it's celtic and awesome. I love the characters, not just the main ones but even the side ones like the little brothers, the father, lords,Honestly I don't understand how this got such a low score. Compared to Frozen (which somehow, mindblowingly, has a HIGHER score...what the **** this is a masterpiece. I have very little in terms of bad to say about this movie. I love the music.... it's celtic and awesome. I love the characters, not just the main ones but even the side ones like the little brothers, the father, lords, etc.... they're all great and have some depth to them. You even get to hear some background about their relations to one another. I also LOVE how this Disney princess isn't the usual push over girl who doesn't do anything for herself. She DOES do things... for herself, for others, she DOES THINGS! It's a fantastic and refreshing change to see..... this girl doesn't need a man at her side and she proves that unlike the conventional princess. The story is simple but it's told with such depth and magic and in such a good way there's just no way you can dislike the movie.

    On another note, I also like the pixar theory going on with this regarding Boo from Monster's Inc. Not sure if I believe it but it's interesting (look it up if you don't know what I'm talking about) :)
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  21. Jun 22, 2014
    6
    Brave was my most anticipated movie of 2012. Its trailers showed us something new, something serious from Pixar. I even though it would outshine all Disney princess movie ever. This movie clearly suffered from Brenda Chapman's departure as the firs half of the movie feels serious and promising and the other half is just a mediocre kiddie flick. I thought it was going to be Pixar's How toBrave was my most anticipated movie of 2012. Its trailers showed us something new, something serious from Pixar. I even though it would outshine all Disney princess movie ever. This movie clearly suffered from Brenda Chapman's departure as the firs half of the movie feels serious and promising and the other half is just a mediocre kiddie flick. I thought it was going to be Pixar's How to Train Your Dragon. Merida is a very good character, but her transformation through the movie didn't feel right. The animation is gorgeous and the voice work is very accurate and very respectful to Scottish culture.The twists and turns made this movie feel like The Brother Bear 3. Expand
  22. Jun 20, 2014
    10
    Loved the characters and the world. The story is familiar (Little Mermaid/Brother Bear) yet heart warming. One of my favorite Pixar films and Merida's my favorite Disney princess.
  23. Jun 8, 2014
    7
    Well Pixar's first try at a princess movie is enjoyable but clearly Disney is the leader of this market. Now this is my second viewing for this movie first was back when it was released on Blu ray and while i still find the movie entertaining i didn't find myself laughing as much this time around and most of the time the laughs came from the three little brothers other then that i laughedWell Pixar's first try at a princess movie is enjoyable but clearly Disney is the leader of this market. Now this is my second viewing for this movie first was back when it was released on Blu ray and while i still find the movie entertaining i didn't find myself laughing as much this time around and most of the time the laughs came from the three little brothers other then that i laughed maybe 2 or 3 times. Seeing that this is an original story and not a sequel the story is rather unoriginal and underwhelming compared to past original Pixar films other than the Cars movies which are just terrible. Personally i think Steve Purcell had a bit too much of a hands-on with this movie and that's why it didn't turn out as well as it could have.

    The movie follows Merida a young princess and ever since her father King Fergus(Billy Connolly) gave her a bow and some arrows when she was just a child she has been different. She is not like every other princess she is more a tomboy that likes to do archery and go on adventures something her mother Queen Elinor(Emma Thompson) highly disapproves of. Soon her mother and father tell her that she has to get married to one of the three other clans prince's, reluctant to agree Merida and her mother get into a heated argument to a point were Merida storms out and goes into the forest. Once deep into the forest she notices a blue orb type thing floating in the air and she decides to following it, it leads her to a old witch's cabin were she ends up asking the witch to change her mom. Now we have our story and like i said before its unoriginal and underwhelming which is a shame because the trailers made the movie look a lot better then what it ended up being but still though i enjoyed the movie.

    For the most part the only thing that separates this Pixar movie from other movie studios like Walt Disney Animation, DreamWorks Animation, and Illumination Entertainment, is its amazing use of animation. Everything was beautifully detailed especially Merida's hair and the grass which both right from the beginning are a stand out with just how gorgeous the movie looks but i guess with them updating their animation system for the first time in about 25 years it was bound to looks stunning. The cast was good but no one was a really stood out and with a list of actors like Billy Connolly, Craig Ferguson, Emma Thompson, Kelly Macdonald, Robbie Coltrane, Kevin McKidd that was kinda a let down. The action was entertaining but there just wasn't enough of it to really mean anything well i guess because half of the fighting was between the four clans where the humor comes in and no one dies.

    Overall i give it a 7.0 Well honestly i have this as my 3rd least favorite Pixar movie of course behind the two car movies still though this is a good first try for Pixar but honestly they should just let Disney do the princess movies as they obviously the best ones at doing it.
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  24. May 10, 2014
    5
    This was the second not-so-good Pixar movie in a row: Cars 2 being the first. And I personally liked Cars 2 better, so that should tell you something. This, I thought, would be a story about adventure and mystery...but it turned out to be a generic story about a rebellious-and-adventurous princess whose mother wants her to be more princess-y, whereas she wants to be able to do what sheThis was the second not-so-good Pixar movie in a row: Cars 2 being the first. And I personally liked Cars 2 better, so that should tell you something. This, I thought, would be a story about adventure and mystery...but it turned out to be a generic story about a rebellious-and-adventurous princess whose mother wants her to be more princess-y, whereas she wants to be able to do what she wants, and when she runs away after a fight, she finds a witch that turns her into a bear. There are some good parts, like when the bear-mother starts to have to fight to be able to stay human vs giving in to being a bear, and there are some funny characters, like the girl's 3 triplet brothers and the father,but it's just overall a let-down. Expand
  25. Apr 27, 2014
    10
    I didn;t think this sound like the best concept for a disney/pixar movie, but me and my friend went to see it because she legit looks like the main character Merida and it was all a bit of a joke really. However, this movie really surprised me, in fact I love it! I will watch it over and over! It's comical and has a great story line which is truly unique to anything else. The movie centresI didn;t think this sound like the best concept for a disney/pixar movie, but me and my friend went to see it because she legit looks like the main character Merida and it was all a bit of a joke really. However, this movie really surprised me, in fact I love it! I will watch it over and over! It's comical and has a great story line which is truly unique to anything else. The movie centres around a strained relationship between mother and daughter which most people can relate to, and how they decide to resolve their problems. Expand
  26. Apr 22, 2014
    10
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. I enjoyed this movie very much. Concept of the movie was great! Special effect was amazing. So i think this movie is better for any kids or animation lovers :) Expand
  27. Mar 29, 2014
    3
    I have no idea why this film won the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature 2012, Brave was not that great. It had a very bland story with very bland themes and it was not inspiring at all. I really don't know why Pixar made a stupid film like this. All it was was just eye candy which was good as usual for Pixar, but the story was not good. Wreck-It Ralph should have won that AcademyI have no idea why this film won the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature 2012, Brave was not that great. It had a very bland story with very bland themes and it was not inspiring at all. I really don't know why Pixar made a stupid film like this. All it was was just eye candy which was good as usual for Pixar, but the story was not good. Wreck-It Ralph should have won that Academy Award, that film was actually creative; I felt that they just gave the film that reward just because it's Pixar...that's it. Besides the Cars films, Brave is one of Pixar's biggest mistakes. I would not recommend it. Expand
  28. Mar 22, 2014
    4
    brave is a okay animated film . to much a mother and daughter fight in an animated film sort of like peabody and sherman . but this not like it . this film is a irish jig film thats whats cool about it Grade D
  29. Mar 8, 2014
    7
    "Brave" is darker and more violent than other Pixar movies, and although it's slightly weaker than some other Pixar films, it still delivers plenty of humor, fun and emotion. The film makes a solid family & kids film.
  30. Mar 3, 2014
    6
    A safe, average Pixar film which conjures up the usual emotions with its usual plot. It contains some rather surprisingly mature humour and also some good music, and voice acting (although it took me a good few times to register the name Merida as not them exclaiming "murder" every so often) but with its short running time, Brave will make you want and expect more and it doesn't totally deliver.
Metascore
69

Generally favorable reviews - based on 37 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 29 out of 37
  2. Negative: 0 out of 37
  1. Reviewed by: Ian Nathan
    Aug 12, 2012
    80
    No less lovely than former films, in many ways lovelier, but Brave is boutique Pixar: less ambitious, more succinct, excellence at a lower ebb.
  2. Reviewed by: Ben Child
    Jun 25, 2012
    80
    For the animation studio's debut foray into fairytale, Pixar has delivered a rousing family melodrama.
  3. Reviewed by: Stephanie Zacharek
    Jun 25, 2012
    85
    My heart belongs to Bear Elinor, whose movements and mannerisms are a tender echo of Human Elinor's – her character is designed and drawn just that carefully.