User Score
7.2

Generally favorable reviews- based on 473 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 37 out of 473

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  1. Feb 5, 2013
    8
    Of all the Pixar films, this one has me REALLY conflicted as to my opinion of it. The first 30 minutes set up a movie that looks to be something of legend. Then, it goes all Disney on me!? Totally changing the narrative to something else completely. A real shame. Had it continued the way it was going, it would have been phenomenal. But, that mild disappointment aside: It still manages to be very charming and delivers a movie worthy of Disney Pixar. If anything this is the first Pixar film I can say is a perfect example of the two studios working together as one. Animation is spectacular. Voice acting is excellent. Writing is. Is! Is? A little disjointed but that aside still rather charming. Overall: A real shame that the movie wasn't "Brave" enough to be a bit more daring and take the leap that it looked like it was going to. Still, the Disney route was still allot of fun too. Expand
  2. Feb 3, 2013
    7
    Overall, I liked Brave. While I do not think it is one of Pixar’s best it is still a good film. The story and characters are good enough and a lot better than you see in a lot of kids films these days. While I feel like the film could have been a lot better I think it is good enough. Hopefully, Pixar gets their groove back for their next film. While the film is not the best thing I saw this year it was still good. If you want to see a film with a female protagonist set in Irealnd with decent story and characters check Brave out. While I cannot gurantee you will love this film as much Up or Toy Story 3 you will at least like it and who knows maybe you will love it more than I did because this is a good film. Expand
  3. Jan 29, 2013
    3
    If you're not the type to be sympathetic toward people who cause harm to themselves, I cannot imagine that you will enjoy this move. Most of the characters in this movie are unbelievably stupid, but you're supposed to relate to them anyway. What are you trying to say, Pixar?! And it's not like the characters get better and have this nice character arc either. They just stay stupid, up to the credits. Imagine if you watched a movie where the main character was a vegetarian. She goes up to a Burger King and says, "I want something that tastes good." So then the vegetarian gets a burger at the window. But it doesn't end there! She takes a bite! Then she spits the burger out the window and gets super mad at the employee, who says she's welcome to pull back around and order mozzarella sticks or something. The vegetarian then spends the rest of the movie deciding what to eat before figuring out that she could just pull her car around and order something without meat. And then music plays and you rejoice in the fact that the girl finally made the right decision. That's what this movie is like. Expand
  4. Jan 26, 2013
    9
    Pixar has done it again. This movie is simply magical, and great for families. It's beautifully animated, has excellent voice acting, and a heart-warming story. I have to admit after watching Cars 2 I was a little worried that this movie might flop, but Pixar has once again struck gold.
  5. Jan 18, 2013
    5
    The trailer made it look like it had a really good story but then goes of some random tangent, lost our interest. Probably Pixar's worst movie! skip this one.
  6. Jan 9, 2013
    6
    Brave, as to expected from Pixar, is a visually stunning animated family film with fluid action scenes and a great sense of immersion into this film's created world. The plot of reforging a bond between mother and daughter was undeniably sweet but came across a slightly cliched -- the rebellious child going off and making deals with a witch (The Little Mermaid, anyone?). One of my main issues was Merida -- her character design seemed to be a bit off. Whilst her hair was amazing and I understand the effort the animators went through to give life to those wildfire-red curls, I parsed over the 2D concept art and believe she would have been transferred to the screen better in a medium that wasn't 3D. Dialogue wise, some of the Scottish accents seem to have been softened so that audiences could understand -- this does not majorly detract from the film, but it irked me slightly. The humour was a tad generic at times (Her brothers and father) -- but these are all sidenotes. Merida and her mother and the adventure they go through are this film's selling points and their dialogue, interactions, their hardships and their overarching story are indeed touching and entertaining. Watch this film as a standalone movie and you won't be disappointed -- try holding it up to Pixar's greats and you might be. Expand
  7. Jan 7, 2013
    8
    i liked brave, but ot as much as i'd hoped. granted, the last pixar movie i've seen is up, and that one is in my top 10 movies ever seen. brave played out like a sort of standard fantasy adventure movie, but as one of those, it's still a good movie.
  8. Jan 4, 2013
    6
    I was a little curious about this movie, but yet was excited to see it because I love Pixar. The trailer looked pretty good and seemed like an adventure film about a Princess that loves archery. It looks like an awesome adventure and would seem like a kick ass Princess film. However, it wasn't exactly as adventuress as I thought it would be, it was more like a typical Princess story with its parental problems like before from Disney. But I still don't think it is a bad one, yet its not as strong as I hoped. The animation was beautiful, even the Princess's design was pretty cool. I also like the characters like the father / King, I love that guy. He was funny, lovable, memorable, and such a great character. I also like the Princess herself, she was cliche'd a bit but not in a bad way. The three little sons were hilarious. The thing that kind of was a little disappointing was the story. Again, I was expecting an epic adventure, but it was more to grow the connection with the Princess and Queen. The Queen turns into a bear and won't change back till the broken relation is fixed. It's not a bad story, but I was expecting a little more. I think Brave was pretty decent and enjoyable, but its sadly not the Strongest from Pixar. But its still pretty good, I'd give it a chance to check it out. Expand
  9. Dec 30, 2012
    8
    Brave was a film set up to fail. During the time Disney was coming back from Cars 2 and John Carter so this wasn't looked at in the best light. Also its something entirely different for Pixar. But as soon as watch in awe the first act you are set up for a classic....you don't get a classic but you get a very very good movie. The visuals are spectacular....also one of the best examples for 3D. The story is also very good...a nod to the mother-daughter relationship. As you can see this movie is set around the women...the men are well idiots to say the least, except for the triplets they are on a class of their own. The plot is great the only thing that it lacks is that edge. Even if its something new for Pixar its not entirely new for Disney. Expand
  10. Zal
    Dec 23, 2012
    7
    In some ways, this movie exceeded my expectations. In other ways, it didn't. The best thing about this movie was the mother-daughter bond. How many movies (let alone Disney movies) can you think of that have such a theme? It helps that both characters are well written and easy to relate to. Both Merida and Eleanor make valid points but both are also very stubborn and refuse to hear the other one out. The first act of this movie is solid. The rest is a roller coaster. I won't say what happens but there were scenes that came across as very slapstick-y (until the last few scenes) and it took me out of the drama. It wants to be a simple story about a mother and daughter relationship but it wants to be an epic, too. It succeeds in the former but the later needed a lot of work. This is a movie with its heart in the right place and I hope that someone will see this and decide to make another movie with the same themes but done better. Expand
  11. Dec 16, 2012
    9
    "Brave" has all the ingredients of a Pixar movie and like all the others it is a completely masterpiece. The problem is that people can't see a Pixar movie without thinking on Up, Wall-E, Ratatouille, etc. Let's see the film, enjoy it and think that it's a new and different adventure. Maybe it is not has good as the most recent Pixar movies, but it still being a marvelous and well-done movie.
  12. Dec 12, 2012
    6
    Sure, 'Brave' has stunning animation. What else? By that I mean: What else is there that we haven't seen before, but have come to expect from Pixar? Exactly. This is a mild animation entry that certainly is worth your money, but maybe not your time. It's great to look at. Your kids will love it. But the majority of moviegoers have lived long enough to be able to demand more from a feature than something neatly packaged, while remaining hollow deep down. Admittedly, there are glimpses into the movie that could of been, or was at least imagined to be, but 'Brave' isn't it. In fact, while nowhere near as horrible as 'Cars 2', it stands as one of Pixar's laziest efforts. Expand
  13. Dec 11, 2012
    8
    Inadvertently I have watched this two Disney animations hand-in-hand (TANGLED is from the orthodox Disney branch while BRAVE is its flagship Pixar production), which seems to be a perfect paradigm to juxtapose them together and to dissect the state-of-the-art tendency of the mainstream genre (enormously profitable since its chief target are zero in on family with children, so it has a much more important and instructive obligation other than merely an entertainment for the toddlers and above). Coincidentally both films' heroines are princess (Rapunzel in TANGLED and a Scottish Merida in BRAVE), adapted from Grimm Brothers' tale, TANGLED is supremely reminiscent of Disney's other established princess analogs trapped in a magic world, let's say Snow White, Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella, what's more, there will always be a prince-charming to deserve and requite her love. Wisely Rapunzel's Flynn Rider has been sizeably modernized as a reckless, self-mocking yet conservatively "Disney" prince with a thief background. But in BRAVE, Merida is a much more radical rebel by blood, she doesn't have or need a prince with white horse (the film doesn't care to proffer one since all her tribe suitors are one-of-a-kind wackos), she is fighting against her predestined life path which her mother has arranged for her and her status has requested her, a tad thread-bone notwithstanding, but chronicling with a single-linear arc, the mother-daughter predicament has slipped to the hanging-by-a-thread situation when a magic spell transfigures the Queen's appearance into a bear which cannot be recanted after the second sunrise, therefore, instigates an intimate bonding phase for the two, viscerally the mutual love only exudes when something unusual happens, while living in the mundane life, we are all suffering and grated by the love with a insurmountable generation gap. Rapunzel, on the other hand, her main barrier is the ultimate breakthrough from her "mother" Gothel (a greatly overlooked Donna Murphy), who raises her and locks her up in the tower for 18 years, treats her as her own out of a selfish but very understandable motivation (to rejuvenate her youth), but out of any sequential transition, all of a sudden Rapunzel miraculously remember her princess identity (she was taken away when she was an infant, so I doubt there is any memory there, more like an implausible epiphany or actually a screenwriter's block), what's more unbelievably awkward is that she immediately snarls back to her "mother" as if all the recollections of Gothel's evil scheme has been replayed in front of her eyes and she has been tortured for all that year long (actually she is fairly happy and content alone with her cutesy chameleon) , which I deem as a child's play, very much panders to its core audience of pre-school demography. So, from a vantage point under the contemporary context, BRAVE is far more daring and enthralling from its "no guts no glory" premise, it is able to identify with a way broader audience, which is also the main ingredient of the winsome recipe "why Pixar can keep excelling all its peers (if not itself) on the top-tier of the hierarchy", in spite of that on a technical level, all the major animation studios in Hollywood (DREAMWORKS, BLUE SKY STUDIOS, etc.) are almost equally cutting-edge. Music is Disney's strong suit, the first half of TANGLED is a conventional musical showcase, culminating the saccharine romance with the Oscar-nominated theme-song I SEE THE LIGHT, fusing with an intoxicating lanterns-all-over-the-sky spectacle, this has always been the tactic to emit Disney's overblown sentimentality, I am certain it is no longer an all-age proof method now. In BRAVE, although Kelly Macdonald and Emma Thompson's heavy Scottish accents do not get along with my ears, the exotic score and tunes are generally agreeable, and what's more admirable, it doesn't steal the thunder of the film per se. Honestly speaking after the astonishingly-acclaimed WALL-E (2008, 9/10), UP (2009, 9/10) and TOY STORY 3 (2010, 9/10), I automatically skipped last years CAR 2 (2011), BRAVE is a left-field choice, the scale of the story has been slimmed down to a quite unimaginable mother-daughter clash, even grafting it on the most platitudinous soil of a princess's tale. But by good fortune, the film doesn't smear Pixar's paramount reputation, Merida goes through a well-deployed rite-of-passage and the sub-plots such as the blue wisps, the ancient lore of the discontent brother and the witch's hut are all positioned into the right niche to uplift the mythology and idiosyncrasy of the film. As for TANGLED, Disney will never relinquish its tradition (otherwise Walt Disney will definitely be jumping inside his tomb), and it is also an exquisitely-made piece of work, just unfortunately paled by comparison by BRAVE since there is no sparks glittering and all the chirpy happiness seems synthetic and a bit stale. Expand
  14. Dec 9, 2012
    6
    It looks as beautiful as you expect it to be and the story is top notch but Disney's influence is clear. It's a bit too sickeningly sweet in places. It's a safe film, nothing off the wall or unique/intriguing about it like Wall-E or Up. I couldn't sit through it all.
  15. Dec 7, 2012
    8
    A great animated film that presents the incredible story of a redheaded girl and her magical adventures.
  16. Nov 30, 2012
    8
    "Brave" is yet another beautiful masterpiece from Pixar Studios, telling the story of a Scottish princess who causes chaos in her efforts to be independent, and her gripping adventure to fix it. As can be expected from Pixar, the film is gorgeously animated and a pure joy to watch, and as a whole is one of their more entertaining and intelligent mixes of humor, zaniness, and heartfelt storytelling
  17. Nov 29, 2012
    4
    Kind of a disappointment when I watched Brave. I didnt enjoy the animations, I was looking forward to high detailed computer animations. But the background trees were very genertic looking. Close ups, were done very well. The accents really annoyed me as well! They should of made the story more of a fantasy as well.
  18. Nov 29, 2012
    7
    I thought Brave was a very good and enjoyable family movie, but it didn't quite live up to it's Pixar brethren. For one, it felt incredibly short. I know the time listing says 93 minutes but I honestly doubt it was much more than 80 minutes. I have a feeling that "93" number is including the short film that preceded Brave called "La Luna". That was probably 5-10 minutes so that would seem more accurate. Also, the previews didn't do a very good job at representing the movie. The previews made it seem like the protagonist, Merida, would become overwhelmed and then run away from home. During this adventure, she would "find herself" by overcoming various obstacles during the course of the film. While this was partly true, the "adventure" lasted about 5 minutes and didn't lead her to any form of self discovery. Instead, she ended up back home and the path the movie took from here wasn't all that entertaining. The movie looked incredible and the voice acting was great but the plot just didn't unfold in the way I thought it should've. Still, this was a very good movie that the whole family can enjoy. Expand
  19. Nov 28, 2012
    8
    It may not be as impressive as other Pixar adventures, but "Brave" still survives with its charming animation and storytelling.
  20. Nov 16, 2012
    3
    Plot wise it is hard to believe it is a pixar movie. The story is flat and boring. While, other Pixar movies such as Up, Finding Nemo, Monsters Inc., and so many others were instant classics that anyone no matter their age could enjoy, this was a 1 character story that could be explained in 10 seconds. I get what they were trying to do by having a female princess who was tough and tomboyish but it felt like that was all the movie was and that simply isn't enough for it to be a great movie. Pixar isn't the only studio in town anymore, with rivals making masterpieces such as Rio and Bee Movie. I hope that this is only a 1 time hit and miss from Pixar because it would be a shame if this is when they start going downhill. Expand
  21. Nov 15, 2012
    7
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. This time, it's Kelly Macdonald's turn to be the princess, the future queen of Scotland. As Merida, she gets to be brave, but brave how? In Elizabeth, Macdonald plays Isabel Knollys, one of the then-princess' girlfriends, first glimpsed in a meadow, where she climbs off a horse and joins the idling others, who stop their dancing in order to greet the future queen's rival. Elizabeth, meanwhile, undulates alone, pretending not to notice the male presence. Whereas Merida grabs the reigns of her own horse, Isabel needs a man to do the riding, Elizabeth's man, the Earl of Leicester, who would later marry the lesser wench, while "The Virgin Queen", a Protestant, was busy antagonizing the Catholics. Unlike Elizabeth, the reluctant princess' formative years is distinguished by the obfuscation of a love interest and friends, both male, and more pointedly, female. It's a filmic calibration, calculatedly so. Instead of a true love, a man without the pedigree to marry a princess, Merida has a bow; no beau at all, no analog to Elizabeth's earl. Brave, despite its comic tempering, can't quite obscure the fact that Merida hatches a murder plot against the queen. Elinor, due to her interpellation into a patriarchal structure, turns a deaf ear to Merida's plea that she "just listen". The mother is too preoccupied with her daughter's betrothal, thereby circumventing an open dialogue about the redhead's lesbianism. At the outset of Brave, a transfiguration is suggested, when Merida, as a wee lass, encounters a will-o'-the-wisp while retrieving an errant arrow. According to lore, this floating body of blue light is reputed to drive people off safe paths. Metaphorically speaking, as life journeys go, heterosexuality, for a princess and future queen, would seem to be a less complicated road. Marry, and live happily ever after. Merida, however, is no storybook princess. At the archery contest, she declares, "I'll be shooting for my own hand," and afterwards, in the castle, the proto-feminist ranting persists, as the victorious princess, proud of her performative emancipation, tells Elinor, "I'm not going to be like you," before charging off into the woods on her horse. By perchance, the will-o'-the-wisp returns, finding the lost girl at her most vulnerable. Intuiting what Merida wants, the spirit leads the princess to a witch, who then concocts an elixir, a cake, with the power to "change" the queen(into a corpse?). As Elinor writhes and spasms, her daughter sits bedside, oblivious to the potentiality of her mother's death. The girl's overriding concern is that the queen should remand her impending nuptials. She tries to coax some last words out of the queen before the poison takes effect. But unexpectedly, Elinor turns into a bear, causing Merida to remark, "The witch must have given me a gamy spell." These seemingly benevolent words are double-edged, treacherous words that the audience, who presumes the heroine to be good, will vault past, never once entertaining the notion that the tainted cake was meant to kill. After all, it's a children's film. Scan the castle interiors; scan the crowd at the playing field for a girl, a peasant, perhaps, a secret lover who has to escape detection from the parental royals.The cake, and the violence which proceeds its consumption by a matriarchal figure, recalls Heavenly Creatures, when Pauline tells her mother to take the last pastry, to "treat yourself", just before the girls murder Honora Parker. With mom out of the way, Paulie thinks her fate is changed; she and Juliet(first seen dressed as a princess) can now be together. "She doesn't seem to "bear" us any grudge," Juliet says, as the torrid lovers make their last-minute preparations. Neither does Elinor, who adjusts to her new form in record time. That's because she's one, too: a lesbian. While searching for the sprite, Merida lets loose a Freudian slip of sorts, shouting, "Fine, don't come out while my mom is watching." She knows, though; the father, too, about them both. Later, back at the castle, the king tells Merida, "Just like your mom, you devil." He knows that the bear is his wife; he believes Merida. Only as a beast, a monster, can he justifiably kill his gay queen. "Don't let her out!" the king barks out at the housekeeper, or else he'll have to kill Merida, too, bear or not. Brave, in essence, is Mulan with kilts. Even more sexually confused than her Scottish counterpart, only in drag, as Ping, can Mulan love Li Shang. She too is leery about marriage. "When will my reflection show, who I am inside," the cross-dresser sings. Subconsciously, she purposefully sets the matchmaker on fire. But alas, to be a dutiful daughter, Mulan will marry the handsome captain, and please her tradition-bound parents. Merida, however, has other ideas. Like Joan, who passes on sailing to Kiloran in "I Know Where I'm Going", Merida, too, stays on dry land for love. Expand
  22. Nov 9, 2012
    7
    Brave was another good Pixar animation film. Although, it had a very predictable ending. Other than that, it had a good storyline on the twists and turns.
  23. Nov 4, 2012
    5
    Unfortunately, Brave is too thinly plotted to be on the level of animated films like "Up" and "Toy Story 3". Sure, Cars 2 may not have the charm of previous pixar shows, but at least the plot knew where it was going. Brave is a risk that doesn't pay off because Merida doesn't get the narrative she deserves. Merida is a great character, but she deserves more than this.
  24. Nov 4, 2012
    7
    it's disappointing that the film often times resorts to physical humor, but this is still Pixar. Animation is superb; the soundtrack outstanding; and the story, even though not taking any risks aside from a cool twist, is heartfelt.
  25. Oct 2, 2012
    7
    This film which is animated is set in the olden times of Scotland, gives us a glimpse of what Disney/Pixar think about the old days, it
  26. Sep 20, 2012
    9
    Brave is an odd one from Pixar, they have never made a movie quite like this one before. Which is strange as it is really rather traditional, but seeing as Pixar has never done traditional before it makes "Brave" really stand out. Due to this fact it is hard to rank Brave up along with the rest of Pixar's films, as it is just too different. Now, the film strongly reminds me of "How To Train Your Dragon", which is no bad thing, but the humour is much more in the veins of the "Aardman cartoons" in its style. Without giving anything away, Brave is about a girl and her mum, learning to love each other: another classic storyline. As per usual in Pixar films Brave's voice acting is top of the line, offering the best of Scottish talent in great and finely tuned characters. There is one problem really, we didn't really get enough time with many of the characters which is a bit of a wasted opportunity as they are all fantastic and many of them provide the comedy throughout the film (like one of the other tribe's son's voice is impossible to comprehend, a very funny recurring joke, as no one else in the film can understand him either). All in all I don't think it's one of Pixar's best, but it does oddly stand out if you know about Pixar films, it is a little too short however, which is a shame as an extra 15 minutes would have worked wonders. 87/100. Expand
  27. Sep 12, 2012
    6
    Brave is visually lush but lacks the spark that an Animated film needs to stand out. It's also quite run of the mill and wouldn't feel out of place as an eighties disney movie. Its not terrible by any stretch but while Pixar has a strong history of Kids movies that are just as enjoyable for adults, Brave is best left to the kids (and nothing wrong with that)
  28. Sep 11, 2012
    7
    The storytelling was not as solid as other Pixar films, but I found myself enjoying it anyway. Still as humorous as the others, quite emotional, and exceptional acting. If this was created by Dreamworks, it would probably be one of their best features. However, this is Pixar, and their standards are much higher. But I think we're lucky we don't have to see Brave 4.
  29. Sep 7, 2012
    3
    BRAVE is nothing short of an EPIC FAIL.
    I gotta give it to Pixar: even when they screw up, they do it big time. There is no saving this movie, and I have a hard time understanding all the good comments when it's so evident it misses all but the most important spots. Though visually impressive, I've hated it in a way I never expected, even more so because I've loved most of the previous
    Pixar movies, and respected those I didn't. Why? Because time and again, Pixar has always managed to impress me not just with its technical excellency, but most of all with the profound originality of its plots, the charisma of its characters and the beautifully detailed and rich atmosphere of its movies. There is nothing of that here! The characters are completely flat, unbelievable cliches, and Merida itself is the worst of them all, I've stopped tolerating her after like 5 minutes. The movie, more or less, manages to hold itself together in the first part, but it literally commits suicide in the first ten minutes of the second part and from that moment it's a long and painful downfall to the worst Disney story templates. When the script should capitalize on dramatic moments, it trips over itself with several sequences of bad comedy which, other than not funny, are downright irritating. The villain is virtually non-existent and the whole point of the story resolves in a pesky, predictable mother-daughter relationship renewal. The movie also suffers a lot from the celtic atmosphere remaining largely unexploited. Long story short: weak story, nonexistent characters and predictable outcome made this movie a miserable product way under the expectations. It could have been a great movie if only it had been developed more seriously. Expand
  30. Sep 6, 2012
    10
    Disney and Pixar do not deny ever and lead us in our cinemas Brave. Meanwhile, the film manages to give us a vision of the crazy Scottish landscapes with stunning graphics and tells a simple story but what about the family and its importance and how important is the dialogue between different generations.
Metascore
69

Generally favorable reviews - based on 37 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 29 out of 37
  2. Negative: 0 out of 37
  1. Reviewed by: Ian Nathan
    Aug 12, 2012
    80
    No less lovely than former films, in many ways lovelier, but Brave is boutique Pixar: less ambitious, more succinct, excellence at a lower ebb.
  2. Reviewed by: Ben Child
    Jun 25, 2012
    80
    For the animation studio's debut foray into fairytale, Pixar has delivered a rousing family melodrama.
  3. Reviewed by: Stephanie Zacharek
    Jun 25, 2012
    85
    My heart belongs to Bear Elinor, whose movements and mannerisms are a tender echo of Human Elinor's – her character is designed and drawn just that carefully.