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61

Generally favorable reviews - based on 7 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: The story of two eight-year-old Thai girls seeking their country’s national Muay Thai championship and a cash prize that could change their families’ lives forever. [Buffalo Girls]
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 7
  2. Negative: 0 out of 7
  1. Reviewed by: Chuck Bowen
    Nov 13, 2012
    88
    Todd Kellstein doesn't allow you to entirely indulge convenient (though understandable and perhaps irresistible) armchair outrage.
  2. Reviewed by: Michael Atkinson
    Nov 13, 2012
    70
    There's no missing Kellstein's unstated horror during the fight sequences, which traffic in queasy blood sport absurdity that overshadows "Battle Royale" and "The Hunger Games," because the cherubs are eight and because it's all too real.
  3. Reviewed by: Mark Olsen
    Dec 7, 2012
    70
    Underlining it all is the exuberance and charm of the two main subjects, who make this world seem disarmingly innocent.
  4. Reviewed by: Noel Murray
    Nov 14, 2012
    67
    Buffalo Girls' main problem is that Kellstein can't seem to settle on whether he's making an inspirational sports movie (complete with triumphant music on the soundtrack during the fights), or an exposé of child exploitation among the Thai underclass.
  5. Reviewed by: Mark Jenkins
    Nov 15, 2012
    60
    In a rare bit of explication, the movie notes that "buffalo" has two connotations in Thailand. For rural folks, it refers to the strength and perseverance of the large animals, called "kwai" in Thai. To urbanites, however, a buffalo is a hick.
  6. Reviewed by: Jeannette Catsoulis
    Nov 13, 2012
    50
    A story that, though sickly fascinating, is as crudely rendered as its images.
  7. Reviewed by: Richard Kuipers
    Nov 14, 2012
    50
    Considering that many will regard child boxing as inappropriate, at the very least, the documentary invites criticism by choosing not to include any voices of dissent or analysis of the sport within a broader social and cultural context.

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