Buried

User Score
5.5

Mixed or average reviews- based on 221 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 68 out of 221

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User Reviews

  1. Jan 19, 2011
    4
    This movie has some merits, like make real the impression to be buried, but it´s so boring the unique scenario. The scenarios are so expansive, then this movie is most cheapest of history. Because this all the thriller, tension, roles are concentrated in only actor and box. I really do not like.
  2. Jun 11, 2011
    4
    If you can be patient and attentive to a movie about a guy being in a box, you still might not want to see it. I am mixed about the movie; watch it if you really have nothing else to do.
  3. Feb 5, 2012
    5
    While I do appreciate the concept of telling a good story in a limited setting and budget and I have enjoyed many movies which have done this in the past, I did not however find Buried very compelling. The camera shots were the movies strength along with the changing colour schemes as the movie progressed, Reynolds was also well acted. However the story never seemed to be very interestingWhile I do appreciate the concept of telling a good story in a limited setting and budget and I have enjoyed many movies which have done this in the past, I did not however find Buried very compelling. The camera shots were the movies strength along with the changing colour schemes as the movie progressed, Reynolds was also well acted. However the story never seemed to be very interesting and I was bored by the end. There are some things to learn from Buried so I recommend to film makers but the over all story was not interesting. Pass Expand
  4. Nov 4, 2010
    6
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. Paul Conroy(Ryan Reynolds) isn't dead, but the American is halfway there; he's buried; he's a goner, so for all intents and purposes, he's dead, as are all the phantasmagorical residents of St. Agnes Cemetery, the people who know Francis Phelan, the patron saint of drunkards from William Kennedy's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel "Ironwood". The washed-up major league ballplayer's loved ones conduct their lives in pine boxes, under the dirt, an imitation of life, his parents, his infant son, subterranean and regimented. They're zombies who became mixed-up angels, playing the role of guardian instead of brain-eater. It's a lifestyle that the American in Iraq has come to know; his life, suddenly interrupted, when insurgents bomb a convoy of trucks driven by apolitical truck drivers, like Paul, the "lucky" one, the survivor, who stops being a zombie, perhaps realizing, finally, that he's complicit in the war, soldier or not. Alone, but not alone, since the Blackberry his captors leave behind, allows Paul to call for help, and more importantly, give people the vicarious experience of being him, attributable to the wireless gadget's video recording and subsequent transmitting of the hostage "tape" into cyberspace. Being her, being Saskia(Johanna Ter Steege), it's what the killer in George Sluzier's "Spoorloos"(American title: "The Vanishing") promises Rex(Gene Berloets), if he just drinks the coffee spiked with sleeping pills. Released during the pre-Internet days of the late-eighties, when rotary phones were on the wane, but still in use, in which the limitations imposed by an analog-based technology would have made it harder for millions of people to "share the exact same experience"(translated from the Dutch), the tortured lover, bereft of the futuristic hypothetical that Saskia's final moments could turn up on YouTube, ends up drinking from the cup, and becomes a victim of YouDie. Rex is the only one who knows how she died. When the effects of the drugs wear off, he starts screaming, having neither the technological means(a cell phone), nor kung fu(the hands of "The Bride") to escape; he doesn't have a prayer, as "Spoorloos" ends on an unsettling note of unfathomable suffering. The moviegoer never gets comfortable with the idea of being buried alive. Brevity is the key. "Buried" overstays its welcome. Whereas(in "Ironwood") Francis' father "smoked roots of grass" and mother "wove crosses from the dead dandelions and other deep-rooted weaves" as they lay in their graves, likewise, a semblance of culture makes burial seem almost tolerable, in which the Blackberry slowly normalizes Paul's once-frantic predicament, as the film's extended running time(as opposed to "Spoorloos") allows the moviegoer to orientate himself with the extreme spatial dimensions. Knowing this, the filmmaker resorts to cheap tricks as a matter of readdressing Paul's dislocation, like the episode with the snake, and the episode with his mother, shameless manipulations both, of our phobias and heartstrings, respectively. "Buried" may be experimental in form, but the content is pure Hollywood, depicted in a filmic language that's minimalist, but it's minimalism by default, dictated by the confines, not by existentialism. Paul is always doing something; he never just lies there and contemplates his inevitable demise, as Rex does, when he simply whispers his lover's name. "Buried" could not have been made without the advent of the cell-phone. Just like contemporary life, a person who relies on on-line friends, a whole host of faces and disembodied voices, doesn't need to be in a coffin to be isolated. Similar to Joel Schumacher's "Phone Booth", this paean to the information age represents a passing of the torch, as our phone booths slowly turn into ruins, without lament, by us, or perhaps, even by Superman. "Buried" is a perfect expression of our love affair with technology, in which man and phone are entombed in a parasitic relationship. Expand
  5. Aug 11, 2012
    6
    Claustrophobic sufferers beware, you're in for a scare. 'Buried' is good film, nothing to special but it features enough of a decent plot device to fill the full 94 minutes without feeling outstretched and bloated. At times, it does however, feel like Macgyver in a box, err, coffin. You can tell the director was inspired by **** as a filmmaker as there are multiple eerie influences by theClaustrophobic sufferers beware, you're in for a scare. 'Buried' is good film, nothing to special but it features enough of a decent plot device to fill the full 94 minutes without feeling outstretched and bloated. At times, it does however, feel like Macgyver in a box, err, coffin. You can tell the director was inspired by **** as a filmmaker as there are multiple eerie influences by the grand master in this movie. Both the lighting and the camera angles are supporting characters in this film as they attempt to focus on a terrific Ryan Reynolds. Expand
  6. Oct 7, 2015
    6
    A deeply unsettling thriller which does it best to maximise it's low budget intensity through relatively poor decisions and scenarios. However, the feeling of being trapped in a coffin is just devastating and fine performance from Ryan Reynolds shows it true. The ending makes you think however, that there was absolutely no silver lining to this plot of pure misery
  7. Jul 16, 2014
    4
    The end was absolutely gripping and.....that was pretty much the climax of the movie. I rate '4' because the ending was quite incredibly devised but the rest of the plot was such a snore-fest. Also, the main role was acted out well by Ryan Reynolds. Very few good points overall about the film to be told.
Metascore
65

Generally favorable reviews - based on 29 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 22 out of 29
  2. Negative: 2 out of 29
  1. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    88
    Those drawn to unusual, unflinching feats of filmmaking and rare acting turns as well as sustained suspense will be captivated by Buried.
  2. 88
    The use of 2:35 wide screen paradoxically increases the effect of claustrophobia. I would not like to be buried alive.
  3. In the movie's cheapest, most exploitative gesture - just as it is about to run out of tricks - a snake slithers into the pine box in which Paul awakens bound and gagged, not knowing where he is. With that gimmick, the movie sacrifices its last shred of integrity.