Metascore
77

Generally favorable reviews - based on 20 Critics What's this?

User Score
7.1

Generally favorable reviews- based on 9 Ratings

Your Score
0 out of 10
Rate this:
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1
  • 0
  • 0
  • Summary: Inmates at a Rome's Rebibbia Prison perform Shakespeare's Julius Caesar.

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 17 out of 20
  2. Negative: 0 out of 20
  1. Reviewed by: Farran Smith Nehme
    Feb 7, 2013
    100
    Such is literature’s power that the cast is more at ease portraying ancient Romans than speaking as versions of themselves.
  2. Reviewed by: Jordan Hoffman
    Feb 26, 2013
    91
    At 76 minutes, Caesar Must Die is more of an art piece than a thick steak of a feature film, but it maintains a fascinating hum from start to finish.
  3. Reviewed by: Kenneth Turan
    Feb 21, 2013
    90
    Caesar Must Die shows us in the starkest possible terms the electric power of drama to move and touch not only audiences but the actors who bring so much of themselves to their performances.
  4. Reviewed by: Anthony Lane
    Feb 1, 2013
    80
    The result feels, like Shakespeare's play, at once ancient and dangerously new.
  5. Reviewed by: Jessica Kiang
    Feb 9, 2013
    75
    The film is undeniably moving at times, and there are moments of metatextual elegance that feel as though they tremble on the brink of genuine insight.
  6. Reviewed by: Manohla Dargis
    Feb 6, 2013
    70
    There’s an elemental, almost primitive quality to the Tavianis’ condensing that, at its most effective, dovetails with the prison’s severely circumscribed material reality, as if the high walls, barred windows and suffocating rooms were manifestations of the characters’ states of mind.
  7. Reviewed by: Keith Uhlich
    Feb 5, 2013
    40
    Though the Tavianis’ intent is clear—to comment on the thin line separating part and performer, as well as on the quite literally liberating powers of art—the meanings rarely emerge with any elegance or resonance. Hardly a dish fit for the gods.

See all 20 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 1
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 1
  3. Negative: 0 out of 1
  1. Dec 8, 2013
    8
    Beautiful, compelling and creative interpretation of Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar. The story is told in a straightforward way and we can sense the real emotions that overflow from the real prisoners who play the characters. All the strength of Shakespeare’s story is present in this film. The imagery is beautiful and the dialogues were carefully selected. Collapse

Trailers