Celebrity

Metascore
41

Mixed or average reviews - based on 25 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 25
  2. Negative: 7 out of 25
  1. Woody Allen at his most inconsequential and insubstantial; don't expect to remember this black-and-white throwaway of comic sketches five minutes after it's over.
  2. The idea of a Woody Allen movie about fame is enticing, but a meandering screenplay and uninspired acting make this one of his thinnest, tinniest films.
  3. Reviewed by: Andrea C. Basora
    50
    Shot in crisp black and white, this homage to "La Dolce Vita" nonetheless lacks the charm and energy of Fellini's farcical original.
  4. 50
    Suffers from lulls and lapses and one lulu of a casting gaffe, but this keenly observant spoof of the fame game is hardly the work of a burnout.
  5. 40
    When has Woody Allen ever been interested in anything besides Woody Allen? He has no interest in bringing out new sides of his actors. Jim Henson's casts had more spontaneity.
  6. If your tolerance for Branagh's shtick and Woody's narrowness of focus is as low as mine, you can take solace in the director's joke on himself.
  7. This is middling Woody, at best: For every funny line or sequence, there's at least one misfire.
  8. It would be easy to dismiss Celebrity as merely a wafer-thin picture about the wafer-thinness of our narcissistic culture. But the truth is shallower and even less engaging -- this flick should have been called “Unpleasantville.”
  9. Ms. Davis gets to deliver the film's obvious message in a single unremarkable line: ''You can tell a lot about a society by who it chooses to celebrate.'' But most of what you can tell from the fun-house mirrors of Celebrity is what you already know.
  10. 50
    The hero's restlessness infects the rest of the movie; the story feels febrile and unhappy, and Allen seems to take his dissatisfaction out on his helpless characters--especially the women.
  11. Reviewed by: Todd McCarthy
    40
    The spectacle of Kenneth Branagh and Judy Davis doing over-the-top Woody Allen impersonations creates a neurotic energy meltdown in Celebrity, a once-over-lightly rehash of mostly stale Allen themes and motifs.
  12. Woody Allen's new film has a few shortcomings but it's a heartfelt cry from what may be the last serious man left in the America as he contemplates what his native land has become.
  13. It is this sense of real life blurring with make-believe that Allen's film is really playing with, like a kitten toying with a scared mouse. Back and forth he bats the subject, moving between reality, illusion and the imitation of reality with a deft touch that may bruise but never kills.
User Score
6.2

Generally favorable reviews- based on 15 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 5
  2. Negative: 1 out of 5
  1. May 8, 2012
    7
    Being such a big Woody Allen fan, I must confess that my opinion of his films may be skewed a bit. I can tell a bad film from a good film, butBeing such a big Woody Allen fan, I must confess that my opinion of his films may be skewed a bit. I can tell a bad film from a good film, but the worst, well let's not say worst, he does have a couple of bad ones, but on the ones that are considered bad I see as being just okay, not as bad as some may say. Celebrity is that type of film. Celebrity is what I would say a pretty loose film, that is to say there isn't a straight story. It follows writer Lee Simmons, it's an Allen film so you have to expect to see at least one writer of some sorts, played by Kenneth Branagh as he encounters a number of actors and models for the magazine he works with. As I said before the story is really loose, so we just act as witnesses to his encounters with these people, but it gives us a good portrait of what their lives are like and how crazy and spontaneous they can be and some of them just drag them along for the hell of it. One example is a ten minute segment where Leonardo DiCaprio, a young hot headed actor character, encounters Lee and whisks him off to Atlantic City to see a boxing fight. And then Lee has the opportunity to sleep with Leo's character and two other women. That's just one of the Lee's encounters with the showbiz world we see. There are many others. And while all the Lee story is happening, we follow Lee's ex-wife, played by one of Allen's regulars Judy Davis, as she tries to fix her life after the divorce. She also has a number of encounters with the showbiz world as she gets a job at a TV station. Overall i think the film is okay. Branagh can get a little overbearing as he tries to work with the Allen persona, but i think the situations and the number of cameos, including Hank Azaria, director Greg Mottola, J.K. Simmons, Charlize Theron, and Donald Trump even, make up for it and make the film somewhat enjoyable. It's not Allen's worse, not his best, but fits pretty snugly in the middle.
    3/5 C, C+
    Full Review »
  2. Aug 27, 2011
    4
    While the depictions of celebrities are pretty spot on, this film is meandering and largely devoid of laughs or enough bite to truly have theWhile the depictions of celebrities are pretty spot on, this film is meandering and largely devoid of laughs or enough bite to truly have the impact of the film it emulates (La Dolce Vita). Celebrity is like listening to an old man ramble for hours. Full Review »
  3. StephenL.
    May 28, 2006
    8
    almost all of woody's movies are excellent , interesting and more fun to watch than 90% of what's out there. 100 years from now almost all of woody's movies are excellent , interesting and more fun to watch than 90% of what's out there. 100 years from now Woody Allen will still be highly regarded but no one will remember the pompous critics such as Charles Taylor who look down on him. Full Review »