Metascore
70

Generally favorable reviews - based on 24 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 24
  2. Negative: 1 out of 24
  1. Reviewed by: Roger Ebert
    Aug 22, 2012
    100
    A grand, romantic life story about love, loss, regret and the sadness that can be evoked by a violin - not only through music, but through the instrument itself. It is all melancholy and loss, and delightfully comedic, with enough but not too much magic realism. The story as it stands could be the scenario for an opera.
  2. Reviewed by: Lisa Schwarzbaum
    Aug 22, 2012
    83
    Adapting Satrapi's graphic novel about a violinist (Mathieu Amalric) in late-1950s Tehran who's got a broken fiddle and a broken heart and takes to his bed, willing himself to die, the filmmakers rely on expressive eyes to carry a narrative style suitable for a silent movie.
  3. Reviewed by: Noel Murray
    Aug 22, 2012
    83
    Just as the plot combines fantastical and biographical elements-some of it is reportedly based on Satrapi's own family legends-so the filmmaking veers from straightforward to more outsized. The tonal shifts don't always work.
  4. Reviewed by: Joe Williams
    Oct 19, 2012
    88
    Although the story is mournful, the movie is buoyed by a heaven-scented surrealism.
  5. Reviewed by: Eric Kohn
    Aug 16, 2012
    83
    While visually scrumptious, the movie struggles to reach a greater profundity that it never quite obtains, but its childlike emulation of a grand tragedy is indelibly precious.
User Score
7.4

Generally favorable reviews- based on 9 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 1
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 1
  3. Negative: 0 out of 1
  1. Lyn
    Aug 12, 2014
    7
    A slight but lovely tale animated by touches of magical realism and the expressions on Mathieu Amalric's always interesting face. One might wish that he had more drama to work with -- and more interactions with actors of comparable magnetism. (See: the terrific "Jimmy P.," with Amalric and Benicio Del Toro.) But I enjoyed the touches of exotic whimsy amid the familiar themes of love and loss. Full Review »