DreamWorks Distribution | Release Date: August 6, 2004
8.9
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Universal acclaim based on 379 Ratings
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26
Negative:
4
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9
ZiggyStardustJun 15, 2011
A great movie to enjoy alone. It may appear superficial, but it truly tries to deliver a message. For everyone who enjoys good movies, this is a must see. Definitely one of Tom Cruise's best performances.
3 of 3 users found this helpful30
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10
Compi24Nov 28, 2012
Michael Mann's "Collateral" initially piqued my interest because of it's fairly intriguing premise; a cab driver happens to pick up a hitman for a passenger. However, as I watched the film, I realized that there was a lot more to this filmMichael Mann's "Collateral" initially piqued my interest because of it's fairly intriguing premise; a cab driver happens to pick up a hitman for a passenger. However, as I watched the film, I realized that there was a lot more to this film than the well written story. The movie features a breadth of captivating performances. Namely, Cruise's badass "Vincent" character and Jamie Foxx's Academy Award-Nominated performance as "Max". Tom Cruise's character is freaking hilarious - this movie features a virtual showcase of Tom Cruise Psychopathic Badassery. Between him and Foxx their chemistry makes for pretty great entertainment and some awesome dialogue too. In terms of technical aspects the film does well at utilizing an arsenal of stylish, yet still subtle camera techniques. Also the film uses a very significant amount of dark lighting to enhance the overall visual quality of the film and the gritty West L.A. setting. The ending sequence of this movie is probably one of the most absorbing scenes I've ever seen - really stressful stuff. Overall, "Collateral" makes for an invigorating experience with a smart story, superb acting, and a poopload of thrills. Expand
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10
JorjiCostavaJan 13, 2014
This movie is my all-time favourite. It offers awesome acting from Jamie Foxx and especially from Tom Cruise, in one of the finest performances I've ever seen. It also boasts great dialogue. Combine this with absolutely thrilling scenes andThis movie is my all-time favourite. It offers awesome acting from Jamie Foxx and especially from Tom Cruise, in one of the finest performances I've ever seen. It also boasts great dialogue. Combine this with absolutely thrilling scenes and tense moments, and you get a breathtaking, heart-stopping thrill ride from director Michael Mann. A masterpiece. Expand
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8
FranzHcriticJun 20, 2014
It's an engaging thriller with a perfect pace and timing. The tense moments are enhanced by the combined performances of Jamie Foxx and Tom Cruise. Foxx's realism and Cruise's coldness and calculation sport an unlikely yet interesting duo,It's an engaging thriller with a perfect pace and timing. The tense moments are enhanced by the combined performances of Jamie Foxx and Tom Cruise. Foxx's realism and Cruise's coldness and calculation sport an unlikely yet interesting duo, whose moral clashes never distract the audience from the impending violence to occur in downtown Los Angeles Expand
3 of 4 users found this helpful31
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8
cameronmorewoodNov 17, 2012
Director Michael Mann is a smart and experienced one, and he knows how to make his thriller without insulting our intelligence, but while still dazzling us with a wicked labyrinth of a plot. Collateral is also punctuated by some determinedDirector Michael Mann is a smart and experienced one, and he knows how to make his thriller without insulting our intelligence, but while still dazzling us with a wicked labyrinth of a plot. Collateral is also punctuated by some determined and surprisingly deep performances. Expand
2 of 3 users found this helpful21
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8
grandpajoe6191Sep 29, 2011
Veteran Director Michael Mann's "Collateral" is a very smart movie. It silences the audience with rich visuals and carefully chosen words, changing a average story into a amazingly tense one.
5 of 8 users found this helpful53
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7
HalfwelshmanOct 13, 2011
Collateral is a very enjoyable film for the most part, a clever variation on psycho-horror and hostage-thriller films. It is easily one of Tom Cruise's strongest performances (and quite creepily, when he intentionally plays "mad", he comesCollateral is a very enjoyable film for the most part, a clever variation on psycho-horror and hostage-thriller films. It is easily one of Tom Cruise's strongest performances (and quite creepily, when he intentionally plays "mad", he comes across as rather reserved, especially compared to his perceived off-screen persona). The dialogue throughout crackles - the script is of an extremely high quality, and both leads handle the material with extreme skill. My only problem with the script is an over-reliance on cliched psychoanalytic conversation (debating the morals of killing indiscriminately for instance), Vincent's veiled threats and Max's attempts to keep level-headed were engaging enough without them trying to "understand" each other - Vincent's dangerous, we get it! The film works as a solid and effective thriller right up until the final act. Here it resorts to a succession of increasingly silly set pieces further undermined by lack of attention to detail (what does and doesn't go off in a power cut for instance). Perhaps Mann would have been better off wrapping things up thirty minutes earlier, ending on a high with the truly exhilarating nightclub set piece. Despite its flaws, in the end Collateral is a pleasant diversion - it's perhaps not as clever as it thinks it's being, but as entertainment it dazzles. Expand
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8
hoops2448Oct 15, 2011
Collateral is one of those films that tries to be brilliant (and comes pretty close too) but ends up shooting itself in the foot. The film tells the story of Max (Jamie Foxx) an LA cab driver who unfortunately picks up Vincent (Tom Cruise)Collateral is one of those films that tries to be brilliant (and comes pretty close too) but ends up shooting itself in the foot. The film tells the story of Max (Jamie Foxx) an LA cab driver who unfortunately picks up Vincent (Tom Cruise) and agrees to take him around LA all night. Vincent has 5 stops but Max soon discovers that at every stop Vincent is killing people. This starts a cat and mouse series of events all in the space of one cab as Max continues to drive Vincent around. The concept is a good one and its handled by director Michael Mann with his signature over the top action but its also very subdued and allows the actors to add certain elements to their characters that a popcorn action film would not. In fact Tom Cruise has one of his best performances as Vincent, a very intelligent and sadistic portrayal of someone we really should hate but through his actions we end up not being able to look away. The reason that Collateral narrowly misses brilliance is that Mann seems to lose focus at the end of the film with everything that made Collateral great (the confined space, the tense conversation and the occasional dead body) disappearing in favour of a, simply put, stupid ending which employs the cliched Hollywood ending with a big chase but it does it with so little care for specifics (unlike the rest of the film) that it just seemed incredibly rushed and as if no effort was put in at all. Collateral has all the hallmarks of a brilliant film but thanks to the ending it feels like a summer popcorn flick with no heart. My advice, turn it off at the car crash (you'll know which one) and imagine an ending that doesn't make you want to shout at the screen. Expand
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8
beingryanjudeAug 27, 2014
A tense showcase of smart thrills and slick performances, Collateral is a successful pairing of Cruise and Foxx under the wing of Michael Mann. The concept is beguiling.
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7
SpangleJun 3, 2014
Overall, Collateral is a pretty good film. The visuals are outstanding and really make this film a gorgeous watch. Tom Cruise is also killer (heh) in his role as a hitman. He gets a bad rap due to his personal beliefs, but the man can reallyOverall, Collateral is a pretty good film. The visuals are outstanding and really make this film a gorgeous watch. Tom Cruise is also killer (heh) in his role as a hitman. He gets a bad rap due to his personal beliefs, but the man can really act. Jamie Foxx also does well as the cab driver and Mark Ruffalo makes a solid supporting appearance in this one as well. The thrills are also certainly there and, though implausible at times, they are most plentiful at the end of the film, though, really, you could be on the edge of your seat for much of this one. Overall, however, I cannot help but feel like this one was nothing but pretty good. Michael Mann's direction is great as always here, but this one never really "reaches for the stars", rather it is content to just be a relatively straightforward and entertaining movie. Now, there is nothing wrong with that, but it certainly would have been nice to see that extra little bit given. Without it, it honestly feels like something is missing from this one. Expand
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7
Nesbitt10Jul 8, 2013
“Collateral” isn't a terribly original motion picture. However, it’s the strength of the lead performances and the stylish direction of Michael Mann that obscures the weaknesses in plotting and credibility. For the most part “Collateral”“Collateral” isn't a terribly original motion picture. However, it’s the strength of the lead performances and the stylish direction of Michael Mann that obscures the weaknesses in plotting and credibility. For the most part “Collateral” remains a sharply taut thriller but ever so gradually towards the end it tests our plausibility nerves. The movie never fails, but it never really deepens either. The story line never deviates from going somewhere unexpected, but at least it’s always satisfying.

Los Angeles cab driver Max Durocher (Foxx) lives an incredibly mundane life. He drives a cab day in and day out and has for the last twelve years. His only escape from reality is a photo of a tropical island and the fact that he wants to start his own limo company. All that changes when a government investigative attorney named Annie Ferrell (Jada P. Smith) gets in his cab from the airport. She's wound tight, getting ready for a big case the next morning, but he charms her into talking and makes a favorable impression. Immediately after dropping Annie off downtown, he picks up a fare that is known only by his first name Vincent (Cruise). Vincent offers Max a deal he can't refuse $700 for making five stops, then getting him to the airport for his flight out of LA. As the L.A.P.D. and F.B.I. begin to put the pieces together, they race to intercept the two of them. Max and Vincent's survival becomes dependent on each other, in ways neither would have imagined.

The survival-of-the-fittest, do-or-die theme eventually becomes rather one note. The amusing, exceptional first half of the film is undermined when the story races towards a prevailing, mechanical conclusion. Acting and atmosphere define the film, but there are times when style can become substance, and this is one of these instances. The performances by Cruise and Foxx are the highlights, and Mann's direction guarantees that any chance of boredom or disinterest will not materialize.
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8
MovieGuysSep 15, 2013
Collateral was a good, action-packed thriller with enough taxi shots to last me a lifetime. Tom Cruise is at his best, and so is Jamie Foxx. Both actors contribute well-rounded,tough characters into a good cast, also including Javier BodemCollateral was a good, action-packed thriller with enough taxi shots to last me a lifetime. Tom Cruise is at his best, and so is Jamie Foxx. Both actors contribute well-rounded,tough characters into a good cast, also including Javier Bodem and Mark Ruffalo. This movie had a pace that was just right, as well as a story that was gripping and fun to watch. It also gave you a feel of time, because of the 5 jobs Tom Cruise had to pull. You knew were you were in the movie based on how many were left, granted you can do math. In summation, this was a good tale of two very different people having to put up with each other, even when guns are drawn. Jada Pinkett Smith tied the movie together, and also played the role well. The only negative thing i have to say is that it got a tiny bit slow at points, and the dialogue as well as camera shots could've been cleaned up a bit. But other than that, this is a flick worth watching. Expand
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9
BlancoA.Aug 5, 2004
I was a huge fan of Mann's short-lived television show "Robbery Homicide Division" which was also set in Los Angeles. There's something about Mann & the city of L.A. -- he captures its essence like nobody else in recent memory -- I was a huge fan of Mann's short-lived television show "Robbery Homicide Division" which was also set in Los Angeles. There's something about Mann & the city of L.A. -- he captures its essence like nobody else in recent memory -- maybe since "Chinatown". This is the film that makes Jamie Foxx a legitimate star. His performance is subtle yet powerful. (And, incidentally, Jada Smith and Mark Ruffalo are wonderful in smaller roles - both of which feel gritty and authentic.) You come to expect a lot from Tom Cruise, and he delivers in an unexpected way in Collateral. No character in this film is stock, and everybody keeps you guessing. Sure, there's a typical Robbery-Homicide, Homicide: LOTS - style of plot, but the plot is unimportant. It's the exchange between the righteous cab driver and the morally bankrupt hitman who immediately learns to appreciate the discipline and guiding principles the cab driver lives by. I also have to say that the music choices in the film are spot on. Go see this and enjoy. Expand
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9
Myles#13Jul 2, 2006
An average script with super acting and first class directing by Michael 'Still The' Mann.
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8
LouisH.Aug 27, 2005
I really loved this movie and it is a true rare thriller, Jamie Foxx was great and surely shocked everybody with his performence.
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7
RDalviApr 11, 2006
Drags in the beginning and in parts. But superb performances and a thrilling climax salvage it. Also, Cruise and Foxx's interactions are worth seeing.
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10
JamesMDec 11, 2005
Forget what you think: this is so much more than a buddy action/thriller. This is an absolute masterpiece.
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10
JamesApr 29, 2006
A masterpeice one of the best films of 04. One of tom cruise's best performeces also I was shocked at jamie foxxes performance.
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10
ChristopherP.Feb 23, 2008
I love this movie. What is most appealing about it is the suspense, pacing, and overall style. Vincent (Tom Cruise) is the epitome of a cool-headed, deliberate and heartless professional killer. Attractive of his role is the depth of his I love this movie. What is most appealing about it is the suspense, pacing, and overall style. Vincent (Tom Cruise) is the epitome of a cool-headed, deliberate and heartless professional killer. Attractive of his role is the depth of his character. Often he'll respond to Max's (Jamie Foxx) obvious signs of distress and anxiety with a psychological and philosophical response meant to calm him, at one point lecturing to him the concept of adaptation.. It really separates him from the typical hit man in many movies, and it's very entertaining to watch. Jamie Foxx does an intense performance, portraying well Max's coping and dealing with his predicament, and he develops as a character as he faces more severe stress, following the theme of "adaptation" that Vincent mentions early in the movie. Side characters such as Fanning (Mark Ruffalo) add to the depth of the story well by giving a different perspective. During the twist near the end of the movie involving Vincent and Fanning, Vincent's nihilistic philosophies are highlighted. I've heard a lot of complaints regarding the unrealism of the ending, but I didn't have too much of a problem with it. I mean, Vincent was shot in the face beforehand, so that may have been a bit disorienting. With regards to that, I thought it closed very well and had a well-directed final few moments that kept me on the edge of my seat. It's overall an exceptionally entertaining film to watch, with quick pacing, sharp dialogue, intense performances, and consistently evolving characters. Expand
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10
JackBFeb 14, 2009
Dont listen to Chad (SPOILER), i think in just about any circumstance, one person could kill another if they had a gun and someone else didnt! Been watching too many movies chad!
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9
ColginatorAug 5, 2015
You're driving a car. There's a man sitting behind you. He intends to kill 5 people and wants you to drive him to them. What do you do? This concept is the focus of Collateral, putting a normal man in to an impossible situation and followingYou're driving a car. There's a man sitting behind you. He intends to kill 5 people and wants you to drive him to them. What do you do? This concept is the focus of Collateral, putting a normal man in to an impossible situation and following his desperation as he tries to do whatever he can to make it through the night.

Whilst this is the film's story, it begins as a movie with a far different tone. To begin with we follow cab driver Max (Jamie Foxx) as he carries out his normal night of fares. He picks up a woman named Annie (Jada Pinkett Smith) and they flirt and talk as he drives her on the journey. He talks of his dreams of making his own Limo company and she talks of her stressed life as a Lawyer. It ends with her thanking him and passing a number. This scene is great partly because it works so well on its own, almost like a separate short film. It's a romance that does not feel phoned in at all, but instead develops some genuine chemistry between the pair.

More importantly, it's an essential scene in showing us the kind of man Max is in his normal life. He's just a regular guy, who may dream of his limo business but has never had the nerve to act. It's important we see this so we can understand the normal person he is before his life is very suddenly thrown into disarray. This happens when a man named Vincent (Tom Cruise) pays Max $600 to drive him for the night and get him to the airport as he hates life in the city and wants to leave as soon as possible. However Max discovers that his passenger is a hit-man and is taken hostage to drive Vincent to 5 targets he needs to kills that night. After this we watch as Max reluctantly drives him wherever he's told, trying to get away from at every possible turn and reduce the death toll in Vincent's path.

By all rights the plot is something that you would expect from a typical action movie. But the film is able to elevate it far above the standard action movie formula through the very realistic approach it uses to tackle the story. This is done by constantly grounding the story through Max. He's nothing like your usual John McClane action hero who spouts out one liners and makes light of the situation, but instead a very uncertain and terrorised victim. His attempts to get away from Vincent are often badly thought out and he reacts to murder just as any ordinary person would. Foxx's down to earth performance is definitely the anchor of the film as it ensures that the focus is not on the action, but rather a tense conversation between a sociopathic killer and a man in fear of his life and the lives of those around him.

When it comes to who you might picture in the role of a murderer, it's unlikely that Cruise would be the first person to come to mind. However Cruise also does a great job at playing outside his usual roles. Instead of being the cocky likable hero, he's a very detached man who's able to blend into crowds and drift in and out without turning a single head. He's utterly ruthless with no regard for human life and will do anything he needs to get the job done. He doesn't even feel guilt for any of his actions and looks down on others like Max who do feeling it as redundant to feel empathy for people he never even knew. He even disdains the typical life of people in a city like Los Angeles, where people seem to just drift through their lives and never take any real risk in their lives.

This story could have all too easily been a run of the mill action movie. But fortunately through both Mann's great direction, a screenplay that knows to put the focus on character over action and great casting, it becomes a truly incredible thriller.
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10
bfoore90Jun 12, 2017
Probably my favorite Tom Cruise movie as a whole, Michael Mann delivers a gritty and tense thriller led by a razor sharp, almost chilling performance by Tom Cruise.
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8
heeldavidNov 23, 2014
This 2004 Michael Mann classic is a thrilling 120 minute ride, Awesome Acting from Jamie Foxx especially from Mr Cruise in a amazing villainous turn.
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8
chwJun 8, 2015
Collateral was a really good movie. You would swear that everyone did what they did in this outside of acting, especially by Foxx (even though he doesn't get paid much for a job he acts out so well).
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8
diogomendesOct 10, 2015
"Collateral" is pretty much a strong movie, and that's all thanks to the likes of Tom Cruise and Jamie Foxx. Some characters were killed off unnecessarily and I think some of those should have been more fleshed out, but this was an all-around"Collateral" is pretty much a strong movie, and that's all thanks to the likes of Tom Cruise and Jamie Foxx. Some characters were killed off unnecessarily and I think some of those should have been more fleshed out, but this was an all-around entertaining movie with tension and smooth direction. Pacing is another thing that is solid, and the well-handed camerawork gives L.A. a stunning look. Definitely going to be in my top of All-Time Favorite Movies.

Final Score: 8/10
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9
MattBrady99Aug 30, 2015
Collateral might actually be my favorite movie from Michael Mann. Tom Cruise and Jamie Foxx both gave a great and unforgettable performance in this movie, and the fact that Tom Cruise is playing a villain was so brilliant and payed offCollateral might actually be my favorite movie from Michael Mann. Tom Cruise and Jamie Foxx both gave a great and unforgettable performance in this movie, and the fact that Tom Cruise is playing a villain was so brilliant and payed off excellently well, and that was pulled off by the writing, the directing, and Cruise himself. Michael Mann has a beautiful and yet stunning vision of LA nights that got me this warm feeling inside of me with this open world feel to it and the amazing cinematography that got me so awe-stuck. A lot of people say Heat is their favorite Michael Mann movie and while I do like Heat I got to say that I enjoyed and loved Collateral a little more. Expand
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8
RalfbergsAug 18, 2015
I quite enjoyed this movie, it was fun, had plenty of action and tension until the end. Of course, some parts were quite unreallistic, but it is like that for many action/thriller movies, so I'll forgive them that. Good acting from Tom CruiseI quite enjoyed this movie, it was fun, had plenty of action and tension until the end. Of course, some parts were quite unreallistic, but it is like that for many action/thriller movies, so I'll forgive them that. Good acting from Tom Cruise and Jamie Foxx - they had a really good chemistry here I think and the movie wasn't that predictable (even though I guess the ending was). Expand
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10
ReelViews94Mar 23, 2016
Reasserting his status as the cinematic master poet of nocturnal Los Angeles, Michael Mann has elevated a gritty but straightforward story — about a hit man forcing a taxi driver to take him on his appointed rounds during one violent night —Reasserting his status as the cinematic master poet of nocturnal Los Angeles, Michael Mann has elevated a gritty but straightforward story — about a hit man forcing a taxi driver to take him on his appointed rounds during one violent night — into a mesmerizing, sometimes thrilling ride in “Collateral.” Occupying a dramatic, philosophical and sensory twilight zone that casts a considerable spell, this intensely focused piece soars not only on the director’s precision-tooled style but also on the outstanding interplay between leads Tom Cruise and Jamie Foxx. Star power, top reviews and powerfully delivered crime movie pleasures should translate into muscular B.O. in all markets.

Everything, from the gun-metal gray of Cruise’s hair and suit, the exceptional selection of precise locations and the dense mix of the soundtrack to the psychological overlays among the characters and Mann’s creative leap that led him to shoot most of the picture on high-definition digital video, evinces an enormous sense of artistic concentration that translates into complete audience absorption in matters at hand.

After his excursions into corporate, political and biographical drama in “The Insider” and “Ali,” Mann returns to the home turf he so voluptuously explored in “Heat.” New film is not as ambitious as that staggering 1995 release — it’s like a series of striking pen-and-ink drawings compared with a multicolored mural too big even for the giant wall it’s painted on — and it deflates a bit toward the end, as relatively conventional cat-and-mouse chase dynamics through an office building and subway take front and center after the bracing long-arc build-up. It’s a smaller film, but one that — as a trawl through the city’s scary underworld — reminds at times of “Training Day,” but also stands as a worthy Left Coast response to Scorsese’s indelible portraits of nighttime New York, “Taxi Driver” and “After Hours.”

Mann’s decision to shoot about 80% of the film in high def (a modified Thomson Grass Valley Viper FilmStream and the Sony CineAlta were both used) came from his conviction that the format more closely represents, and exceeds, what the human eye sees at night than does celluloid. Compared with the rich, intense color palettes Mann has employed in his previous work, “Collateral” has a more monochrome look that, paradoxically, combines a sense of deep darkness with a certain washed-out thinness and lack of visual weight. Punctuating this at all times, though, are the pervasive lights of the sprawling city, the appearance of which justifies the use of the new technology; to be sure, the sight of a succession of planes lined up in the air to land at LAX at night, or the spooky yellow glare in coyotes’ eyes, have never been so strikingly or realistically rendered as they are here.

Through the film’s ever-strengthening midsection, one memorable set piece follows another: A visit to a Crenshaw jazz club hinges on a meaning-laden exchange about Miles Davis between Vincent and the boite’s trumpet-playing owner (a superb Barry Shabaka Henley); Irma P. Hall invigorates a hospital visit the men pay to Max’s ailing mother; Max manages to turn the tables on his nemesis in a surprising chase that ends over a freeway, and the great Javier Bardem nails his one scene as a drug lord who relates a telling little parable to his guest.

But it’s all preparation for a sensational 10-minute Asian nightclub melee in which all the opposing forces — Vincent and Max, the cops led by Fanning and joined by Feds headed by Pedrosa (Bruce McGill), the suspicious drug lord’s goons and club henchmen there to protect Vincent’s quarry — converge amid hundreds of oblivious revelers partying to a throbbing techno beat. The action, in which many are killed, is intentionally confusing up to a point but clear enough in the end, and conveyed with cinematic command that’s breathtaking.

Shifting gears to play an outright villain, Cruise is at or near his best here. Hard and cold and endowed with sharp practical intelligence, Vincent has vulnerabilities that the actor reveals in carefully chosen moments. But it’s his ability to keep his eyes on the prize that defines him, and it’s this trait that Max adopts of necessity to get through the night.

Entirely dropping his comic persona, Foxx proves a terrific foil. Establishing Max as someone others find easy to talk to, Foxx doesn’t overdo the character’s shock and hysteria at his sudden misfortune, nor does he make him seem overly weak only to become falsely brave. What he does do is create a memorable portrait of a very ordinary man placed in extraordinary circumstances.

James Newton Howard’s score with source music, tunes of diverse origins and ambient noises, plays a very large role in sustaining the hypnotic mood.

A true masterpiece!
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