Metascore
72

Generally favorable reviews - based on 20 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 15 out of 20
  2. Negative: 0 out of 20
  1. Reviewed by: Lisa Schwarzbaum
    Feb 7, 2012
    91
    Completing his wonderful French cultural trilogy that also includes portraits of the Comédie-Fran¸aise and the Paris Opera Ballet, indefatigable documentarian Frederick Wiseman freely, unobtrusively prowls the joint to create a movie that respects the serious work involved in simulating the sensations of pleasure.
  2. Reviewed by: Stephanie Zacharek
    Feb 7, 2012
    90
    The picture is celebratory, in its own quiet way, as well as clear-eyed.
  3. Reviewed by: A.O. Scott
    Feb 7, 2012
    90
    Mr. Wiseman's particular genius has always been to convey, through judicious editing and dogged filming, the tedium, busyness and quiet intensity of group labor.
  4. Reviewed by: Noel Murray
    Feb 7, 2012
    83
    Anyone could make a film about a theater full of naked women; only Wiseman would take equal interest in the person who handles the ticket-ordering, and the one who makes sure there's a bottle of champagne on every table.
  5. Reviewed by: J.R. Jones
    Feb 23, 2012
    80
    This documentary about Crazy Horse, the legendary Parisian nude cabaret, is so warm, colorful, and sensuous that it seems like a real anomaly for the highly disciplined filmmaker.
  6. Reviewed by: Melissa Anderson
    Feb 7, 2012
    80
    Every shot and edit in Wiseman's film also suggests without over-explaining, allowing a viewer to lose herself in pleasure.
  7. Reviewed by: Scott Tobias
    Feb 7, 2012
    80
    Wiseman's fragmented approach misses the continuity of the show, which mixes erotic dance with comedy, magic and even a little soft shoe, and tells an overarching story that Crazy Horse never quite communicates. Yet there's more than enough compensation in the scenes Wiseman does catch.
  8. Reviewed by: Joe Williams
    Mar 16, 2012
    75
    As opposed to the "gentlemen's clubs" in sinful cities like Las Vegas, the Crazy Horse attracts couples.
  9. Reviewed by: Walter Addiego
    Mar 2, 2012
    75
    If nothing else, you'll surely relish the extravagant rhetoric used by Ali Mahdavi, the club's artistic director, to describe what is basically a tasteful nudie revue.
  10. Reviewed by: Michael Phillips
    Feb 23, 2012
    75
    One Crazy Horse staffer, also female, is asked on camera by a visiting journalist to define the cabaret's notion of eroticism. To "suggest," she says. To "seduce."
  11. Reviewed by: Roger Ebert
    Feb 22, 2012
    75
    The Crazy Horse Saloon in Paris is famous for its "erotic chic" revues, but I found nothing either erotic or chic in this reduction of body parts to geometrical displays.
  12. Reviewed by: Ty Burr
    Feb 7, 2012
    75
    His abiding interest is in the ways that human beings work together, his famous fly-on-the-wall shooting style revealing the constant struggle to connect and create. Wiseman's are the movies to show to the aliens when they arrive.
  13. Reviewed by: Todd McCarthy
    Feb 7, 2012
    70
    Most disappointingly, the dancers never get their close-ups; whether by choice or by some enforced arrangement, Wiseman doesn't approach the gorgeous women to give them the chance to tell their side of what it's like to work at the Crazy Horse.
  14. Reviewed by: Kenneth Turan
    Feb 7, 2012
    70
    If Frederick Wiseman's involving new documentary Crazy Horse is any indication, that old rule about how you get to Carnegie Hall - "practice, practice, practice" - applies equally well to that Parisian temple of self-described "nude chic" known to its intimates simply as "Le Crazy."
  15. Reviewed by: Marc Savlov
    Feb 29, 2012
    67
    At 134 minutes, Crazy Horse could have used some judicious editing, but that relatively minor quibble aside, it provides a revealing and intimate look (as if there could be any other kind) at an institution both familiar and utterly alien.
  16. Reviewed by: David Denby
    Feb 7, 2012
    60
    The French creators of the dance numbers take their work very seriously; they speak of it in terms that would have shamed George Balanchine. That they are sincere in their ideas, however, doesn't mean that they aren't provincial in their own way and long out of date; nor does it mean, to our astonishment, that their show isn't repetitive, solemn, and slightly boring.
  17. Reviewed by: Elizabeth Weitzman
    Feb 7, 2012
    60
    It's undeniably interesting to watch each element come into place, from choreography to costumes. But the truth is, most viewers will best appreciate the retro-sexy dance numbers themselves.
  18. Reviewed by: Jay Weissberg
    Feb 7, 2012
    50
    What's generally missing here though is a sense of the creative process; rather than sweat-and-tears rehearsals breaking the dances into individual movements, the numbers are largely shown nearly complete. Consequently, there's little sense of the discipline involved, or the struggle for perfection that makes dance documentaries so engrossing.
  19. Reviewed by: V.A. Musetto
    Feb 7, 2012
    50
    Sexploitation and art blend uneasily in Crazy Horse.
  20. Reviewed by: Joshua Rothkopf
    Feb 7, 2012
    40
    You doubt Wiseman's sense of pacing. Still, he must have had a good time shooting.

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