Metascore
68

Generally favorable reviews - based on 40 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 32 out of 40
  2. Negative: 1 out of 40
  1. Reviewed by: Scott Tobias
    Jul 28, 2011
    75
    Gosling and Stone, too, have wonderful chemistry; their all-night "seduction" sequence is the film's highlight, witty and effortlessly sexy.
  2. Reviewed by: Owen Gleiberman
    Jul 27, 2011
    100
    Nothing more (or less) than an enchanting light comedy of romantic confusion... It's a movie that understands love because it understands pain.
  3. Reviewed by: James Berardinelli
    Jul 29, 2011
    75
    Kevin Bacon and Marisa Tomei make the most of their limited screen time, injecting straight comedy into a movie that occasionally comes close to losing its sense of humor.
  4. Reviewed by: A.O. Scott
    Jul 28, 2011
    70
    The movie, true to its own PG-13 rating, opts for mildness, modesty and chastened optimism. At the same time, though, it seems to know that a crueler, more cynical rendering of its story - a "Bitter, Hopeless, Love" - lurks between the lines.
  5. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    Jul 27, 2011
    63
    Sometimes Crazy, Stupid, Love captures the complexity, humor and sweetness of relationships. But in several scenes, the film takes that insight and replaces it with farcical coincidences and strained scenarios that undercut the poignancy and wit.
  6. Reviewed by: Bill Goodykoontz
    Jul 27, 2011
    70
    Stone is becoming a dependable go-to choice for comedies, brimming with charisma.
  7. Reviewed by: Eric Kohn
    Jul 26, 2011
    67
    Unquestionably stands above the market standard for middlebrow comedies, but it repeatedly approaches greatness and stands down, beholden to forces quite possibly beyond the directors' control.
  8. Reviewed by: Olly Richards
    Sep 19, 2011
    80
    A wonderful comedy of romance, pain and getting it all wrong until somebody makes you do it right. The kind of film that makes you want to call someone the minute it's over, even if just to tell them to go see this movie.
  9. Reviewed by: Andrew O'Hehir
    Jul 29, 2011
    70
    Richer and more enjoyable than the other lame-stream comedies Hollywood has churned out this summer, even though it doesn't know what kind of movie it wants to be when it grows up.
  10. Reviewed by: Bob Mondello
    Jul 29, 2011
    70
    Grant the filmmakers the efficiency of their plotting, even if it reduces characters to types. And credit them with having assembled a cast capable of making the film's craziness and stupidity appealing, even if hitching actors of the caliber of Moore and Gosling (and to a lesser extent Carell and Stone) to material this thin is a little like hitching a Saturn rocket to a go-cart.
  11. Reviewed by: Mike Scott
    Jul 29, 2011
    75
    The engine that really makes Crazy Stupid Love go is the same one that has made Ficarra and Requa's films to this point so appealing: While they thrust their characters into outrageous situations, they always keep things grounded in real, relatable emotion.
  12. Reviewed by: Kyle Smith
    Jul 29, 2011
    75
    Pity the crowds expecting another cute comedy like "Date Night" who wind up at Crazy, Stupid, Love. It'll be like asking for a burger and getting served escargot.
  13. Reviewed by: Elizabeth Weitzman
    Jul 29, 2011
    60
    It's hard to ignore the fact that very little in the movie feels true - no one clicks as a couple, and there are carefully contrived coincidences around every corner.
  14. Reviewed by: Rick Groen
    Jul 28, 2011
    75
    Crazy, Stupid, Love seems at times like a bunch of movies searching for an identity. Happily, some of them are actually worth watching.
  15. Reviewed by: Mick LaSalle
    Jul 28, 2011
    75
    Men will watch Crazy, Stupid, Love thinking they're finding out things about women, but if anything, this movie works the other way. Women will get a glimpse into the male mind.
  16. Reviewed by: Joe Williams
    Jul 28, 2011
    63
    Directors John Requa and Glenn Ficarra were weaned on earthy comedies like "Bad Santa," and every moment of mature insight in Crazy, Stupid, Love is answered by a scene of formulaic farce.
  17. Reviewed by: Shawn Levy
    Jul 28, 2011
    58
    At 118 minutes it's longer than "The Philadelphia Story" or "Annie Hall" or "When Harry Met Sally" or "500 Days of Summer" or, well, you get it. Working from a script by Dan Fogelman that wasn't overly bright or sharp to begin with, directors Glenn Ficarra and John Requa dawdle and stretch and repeat themselves, until what should have been light and brisk becomes leaden and overdone.
  18. Reviewed by: Betsy Sharkey
    Jul 28, 2011
    80
    Between the writing, acting, directing and the rest, it works. Not crazy, not stupid, and filled with love. Period.
  19. Reviewed by: Stephanie Zacharek
    Jul 28, 2011
    75
    Crazy, Stupid, Love. is, for the most part, an effective love story, but the two figures in thrall to one another aren't the ones you think: The magnetism between the movie's two male stars, Steve Carell and Ryan Gosling, is what really makes the movie tick.
  20. Reviewed by: Joe Morgenstern
    Jul 28, 2011
    80
    The movie also fights for what it wants - to touch us in the course of entertaining us - and it succeeds, with its zinger-studded script that transcends clumsy mechanics and a spirited cast that includes Marisa Tomei as a nymphomaniacal middle-school teacher, and Jonah Bobo as a lovesick eighth-grader.
  21. Reviewed by: Ann Hornaday
    Jul 28, 2011
    50
    With its contrived setups, preposterous coincidences and calculated sentimentalism, Crazy, Stupid, Love seems beamed from the same alternate reality as "Larry Crowne." We might enjoy the ride while we're on it, but it will seem like a visit to another planet once we're home.
  22. Reviewed by: Wesley Morris
    Jul 28, 2011
    75
    The fun is in watching these robustly generic people trip over and pinball off of each other, seeing them eddy around Carell, who as the straight man here is getting dangerously close to Greg Kinnear's territory - where comedy is too self-serious to laugh at.
  23. Reviewed by: Carrie Rickey
    Jul 28, 2011
    75
    In the end, Ficarra and Requa take all the formula ingredients and blend them into a satisfying - and tasty - concoction. "A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy," meet "All's Well That Ends Well."
  24. Reviewed by: Ben Sachs
    Jul 28, 2011
    50
    As in the directors' earlier work, the humor is rooted in humiliation, but the execution here is tepid and indecisive, possibly because the big-name stars need to seem charming no matter how loathsome or idiotic their behavior.
  25. Reviewed by: Peter Travers
    Jul 28, 2011
    75
    What makes Crazy Stupid Love a cut above is actors who let pain seep into the laughs. Here's a comedy you really can take to heart.
  26. Reviewed by: Michael Phillips
    Jul 28, 2011
    50
    This is the "Babel" or "Crash" of ensemble romantic comedies, with screenwriter Dan Fogelman mapping out several narrative surprises that throw you for little loops as they're delivered.
  27. Reviewed by: Keith Uhlich
    Jul 28, 2011
    60
    It's especially disappointing when the story takes an inevitable turn to starry-eyed mush, dulling the sharp satire of the crazy, stupid ins and outs of romantic entanglement with an unconvincingly saccharine one-true-love-for-all moral.
  28. Reviewed by: Marjorie Baumgarten
    Jul 28, 2011
    67
    As far as nonraunchy, adult-geared rom-coms go these days, Crazy, Stupid, Love. leads the pack by several heads.
  29. Reviewed by: Roger Ebert
    Jul 27, 2011
    75
    The strength of the movie, however formulaic its structure, is that it is slightly more thoughtful about its characters. It's not deep, mind you, but it considers their problems as more than fodder for comedy.
  30. Reviewed by: Andrew Schenker
    Jul 27, 2011
    50
    This schizophrenic conception of Gosling's character is indicative of the film's largely dichotomous view of romantic relationships.
  31. Reviewed by: Steve Persall
    Jul 27, 2011
    67
    There are laughs that stick in your throat, when they aren't broad strokes shattering a forlorn mood that occasionally makes the movie feel like a companion piece to "Magnolia," or any film depicting downbeat people realizing they have more sorrow in common than expected.
  32. Reviewed by: Roger Moore
    Jul 27, 2011
    75
    As a Steve Carell comedy, it works. He plays the victim well, the guy romantically in over his head ever better. Surrounding him with people this funny - Ryan Gosling, who knew?
  33. Reviewed by: Rex Reed
    Jul 26, 2011
    25
    What to say about an uphill slog called Crazy, Stupid, Love? It's not nearly crazy enough to clear the clogged arteries of summer comedies, and when the love appears, it's in all the wrong places. Oh well, at least they nailed the stupid part.
  34. Reviewed by: Karina Longworth
    Jul 26, 2011
    70
    Shooting on grainy, high-speed film stock with an often handheld camera, working with a suite of actors who are game to both play light and silly and dig deep, Ficarra and Requa lend a naturalism to highly contrived, patently absurd situations.
  35. Reviewed by: David Denby
    Jul 24, 2011
    70
    A genial, messy comedy of marital discord and mismatched lovers.
  36. 70
    The script, by Dan Fogelman, is unusually and gratifyingly bisexual - i.e., it boasts scenes from both the male and female points of view!
  37. Reviewed by: Mary Pols
    Jul 23, 2011
    80
    The movie's biggest surprise is the revelation of Gosling as cunning comedian.
  38. Reviewed by: Kirk Honeycutt
    Jul 23, 2011
    70
    The movie suffers perhaps from too many characters and subplots but all the actors appear to have fun with their characters.
  39. Reviewed by: Pete Hammond
    Jul 23, 2011
    90
    A superb ensemble cast makes the most of the comedy's numerous detours and storylines.
  40. Reviewed by: Peter Debruge
    Jul 23, 2011
    80
    Old-fashioned as that might sound, there's a fresh, insightful feel to this multigenerational love story.
User Score
7.4

Generally favorable reviews- based on 297 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 62 out of 74
  2. Negative: 2 out of 74
  1. Aug 3, 2011
    10
    WAY better than your average romantic comedy! Granted when i saw it with my friends, there was only 1 guy in the audience, but it isWAY better than your average romantic comedy! Granted when i saw it with my friends, there was only 1 guy in the audience, but it is definitely one movie you should see this summer. Love the cast, absolutely hilarious, and the view of Ryan Gosling ain't bad, right ladies? ;) Full Review »
  2. Dec 17, 2011
    8
    Although missing something and it doesn't get crazy till the last 20 minutes the film has incredible heart and cast that make this anAlthough missing something and it doesn't get crazy till the last 20 minutes the film has incredible heart and cast that make this an incredible movie. And it is entertaining. I give this film an 83% of a good movie. Full Review »
  3. Sep 10, 2011
    10
    This review contains spoilers, click full review link to view. It's raining frogs all throughout the city landscape, coming down in webbed sheets on its inhabitants, in which a chosen few, the filmically demarcated, some sad, others sadder, are just looking for somebody to love. The frogs in "Magnolia" is a verifiable miracle, proof positive that god exists. The amphibious downpour signifies hope, empirical evidence that anything can happen, and does, in the film's last scene where a drug-addled woman, lecherously maltreated by her incestuous father, smiles, probably for the first time in years, courtesy of a friendly cop, who says the magic words that jump starts Claudia's dead heart which kept daddy's plundered little girl in mental confinement since "it" happened, just before the screen fades to black. When the world(of P.T.A.) fades in again, in "Punch-Drunk Love"( the 2002 anti-romantic comedy that suggests the existence of soulmates), miracles still never ceases to amaze, offering even more proof of an all powerful, all knowing, absolute being, who manifests himself at a payphone, alongside an advancing parade down some Waikiki street, where the grace of god reflects back into the face of a bipolar bathroom supply wholesaler named Barry Egan(Adam Sandler), as he talks to Lena, the woman who falls in love with him, inexplicably. The harmonium is the miracle which started it all; the accidental harmonium, deposited curbside by some faceless man in a van, as it turns out, was a sign, a vestigial prompting which announces that a little music will soon be coming into Barry's life very shortly. Only seconds earlier, from the street's horizon where the small business owner works out of his warehouse, a fast-approaching vehicle veers from its straightaway destination, clipping a parked car, sending the wayward SUV into a flip and series of rolls, concurrently with the arrival of "the small piano". It's as if the devil and god are racing in the street, making a bid for Barry's soul. The very fact that Barry goes nowhere near the wreck would seem to indicate that the scene is largely allegorical. He knows who's driving, Like Claudia, the blue-suited man has his share of demons(he has mean sisters), yet yearns to be good, so he keeps his eyes on the prize, the harmonium, and ignores the disharmonious cacophony of pulverized metal and steel, whose music isn't suitable for deliverance. Soon after Barry meets his soulmate for the first time(when Lena drops off her car at the garage), he chooses love; chooses to take a chance on the harmonium, when he claims it from the sidewalk, clutching the instrument to his chest, tightly, at long last, taking a chance on life, as he runs back to the warehouse. The harmonium plays "soul music"; the harmonium is the filmmaker's visualization of the ancient proverb: "God works in mysterious ways." Lena is, in essence, an extension of the air-driven keyboard. A soulmate is the first miracle; a soulmate who just happens to attend the same high school as you, now that's the second miracle. "I'm pretty sure I'm your soulmate," says eighth grader Robbie Weaver quite matter-of-factly to his babysitter, in "Crazy, Stupid, Love", a multi-narrative film, that, at times, functions as an auxiliary world for "the freaks who suspect they could never love anyone," who populate Anderson's city of losers. Jacob, a serial womanizer, could be one of those guys who caught T.J. Mackey's "Seduce & Destroy" infomercial on late night T.V., bought the DVDs, and attended the seminar led by the toxic motivational speaker, sitting in a darkened auditorium with the other aspiring misogynistic libertines, taking notes on how to "tame that ****", along with other tricks of the trade, known to all great pick-up artists. Funny thing though, you never actually see the f*ck guru apply his craft; he's all rhetoric and no practice, whereas Jacob, always on the prowl at an upscale nightclub, gets the pick of the litter on a nightly basis. From the women-draped table he presides over, the tomcat spots Cal, "quietly judging [him]", and becomes his mentor, when the cuckolded man's whining over a disloyal wife starts to grate on Jacob's nerves. Emily is Cal's soulmate. But how can that be? She cheated on him. Hanna is Jacob's soulmate, but this horndog is somebody who knows "How To Fake Like You Are Nice And Caring". In "Bedtime Stories", like an ironic homage to "Magnolia", Skeeter(Sandler) gets rained on by gumballs; it's Exodus redux, but then the camera tilts up, revealing a breech in the truck carrying the sugary cargo, suggesting that for every supposed miracle, therein lies a logical explanation. Earl Partridge, a dying old man with regrets(from "Magnolia"), was once Robbie's age, thinking of his future wife in the same heavenly terms as the boy does towards the high school senior. But Earl was an adulterer, just like Emma, and so will Jacob, and perhaps even young, idealistic Robbie, because men do "terrible things". Full Review »