International Film Circuit | Release Date: August 3, 2005
7.5
USER SCORE
Generally favorable reviews based on 49 Ratings
USER RATING DISTRIBUTION
Positive:
36
Mixed:
3
Negative:
10
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7
LeeH.Aug 8, 2007
it takes a while for this movie to focus- but when it does it's powerful. The villain is not so much global capitalism as it is us humans. How people can take a wondrous natural resource like Lake Victoria and change it to a hell hole. it takes a while for this movie to focus- but when it does it's powerful. The villain is not so much global capitalism as it is us humans. How people can take a wondrous natural resource like Lake Victoria and change it to a hell hole. But as a documentary, the powerful parts are drowned out by the tedious, boring, and boring parts. Expand
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9
NikkoAug 2, 2007
so Kyle Smith from The New York Post does not think capitalism is the 'real' problem or greed probably for that matter, but then says in the same tiny paragraph that the 'real' problem is the west buying the stuff they so Kyle Smith from The New York Post does not think capitalism is the 'real' problem or greed probably for that matter, but then says in the same tiny paragraph that the 'real' problem is the west buying the stuff they are selling etc - pray tell Kyle, what would you call that? The buying of signifiers of wealth etc from the poor by the rich using available monetary services etc etc - well, shit on me Kyle, I call that capitalism. You moron. No surprises you are a new york critic then? Nope. Ignorance is bliss. Collapse
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10
PatM.Jul 22, 2007
I've watched a lot of documentaries - and this is one of the best I've seen. The unobtrusiveness of the interviewer adds to the hoesty and impact of the film. I did not know anything about what had happened to Lake Victoria - so I've watched a lot of documentaries - and this is one of the best I've seen. The unobtrusiveness of the interviewer adds to the hoesty and impact of the film. I did not know anything about what had happened to Lake Victoria - so when I first started watching it I was kind of confused - as I watched I started to realize what was happening there - and I felt so sad and angry, so I can only imagine how sad and angry the people there must feel. I Expand
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5
InaTJul 15, 2007
The topic is certainly worth noticing, but instead of clearly spotlighting the issues, the document remains a hard to follow, badly edited and protracted collection of interviews, seeming more confusing than unbiased.
0 of 0 users found this helpful
10
GianN.Jan 11, 2007
This film captures intuitively the complexity of real life and misery of contemporary Africa and its relation with the globalized world. It can only be wished that this film is better used in the near future by professionals of developmentThis film captures intuitively the complexity of real life and misery of contemporary Africa and its relation with the globalized world. It can only be wished that this film is better used in the near future by professionals of development and international cooperation to solve some of the causes of misery: trade of weapons, lack of institutional building (both in civil society and government) and laisser-faire in economics. This films merits to be taken serious not only by people, but also by organizations. Expand
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10
JoeyASep 23, 2006
I saw it on TV last night and at times I was almost sick. It's movies like these that make you think that make you realize cinema and art still matter and communication can still happen in this over-media-blitzed western world. I see I saw it on TV last night and at times I was almost sick. It's movies like these that make you think that make you realize cinema and art still matter and communication can still happen in this over-media-blitzed western world. I see these perch fillets in the supermarket, all nicely wrapped and clean and pink. It makes you wonder about the stories behind all the other clinically pretty stuff we buy and consume in our air-conditioned stores. Connect the dots to the maggots in the rotting fish carcasses and the wars in Africa. At the end of the movie there's a big storm coming. It's like a vision of what's coming. Darwin's nightmare isn't over: it's just begun. Expand
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0
MikeM.Aug 25, 2006
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10
DonaldK.Aug 17, 2006
this is known fact put in light not for everbody to see but to be reminded of, its a big shameful fact from the big western nations,there is even bigger similar shameful facts and the world is made of those...i just wish there were a better this is known fact put in light not for everbody to see but to be reminded of, its a big shameful fact from the big western nations,there is even bigger similar shameful facts and the world is made of those...i just wish there were a better world elsewhere.. a fairer one. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful
2
DarrenB.Aug 12, 2006
Visit the country talk to the people......get the facts straight.
0 of 0 users found this helpful
5
[Anonymous]Aug 1, 2006
The story is not sequence right. Its all over the place.
0 of 0 users found this helpful
9
OscarO.Jun 14, 2006
A vision of Africa that surpasses even the nightmare scenarios of Conrad of Greene. Despite the puzzling title (I thought it was going to be a nature program) I watched it with both fascination and horror. [***SPOILERS***] The Russians bring A vision of Africa that surpasses even the nightmare scenarios of Conrad of Greene. Despite the puzzling title (I thought it was going to be a nature program) I watched it with both fascination and horror. [***SPOILERS***] The Russians bring in their cargos of lethal weapons to replenish the warlords, then leave with boxes of fish from Lake Victoria to supply the European markets. A few of the locals have jobs in the fish factory while the vast majority live in abject poverty, scraping an existence from the by-products of the industry. Men, women and children, many of them shoeless, wade through the maggot-infested fish remains, drying and boiling them in a hellish landscape reminiscent of Hieronymous Bosch. Orphaned children burn discarded fish boxes to extract the glue from them which they then sniff in order to anaesthetise themselves to hunger, boredom and despair. The rich nations of the West should hang their heads in shame. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful
8
JasonFeb 28, 2006
The insights to negative aspects of globalization, unbalanced income distribution, and its social consequences are there, but the filmmaker never really ties the movie in with the relevance of the title of the documentary.
0 of 0 users found this helpful
9
MarkFeb 24, 2006
Disturbing on many levels. Dare see it and understand the impact our pampered bloated lifestyle has on the less fortunate.
0 of 0 users found this helpful
10
LizS.Feb 22, 2006
A great film really spelling out the true meaning of neo-liberalism/globilization: the developed world gets their commodities cheaply and the third world gets perpetual poverty and famine.
0 of 0 users found this helpful
0
T.H.Feb 15, 2006
The worst movie I saw in 2004 without a doubt. Several times I considered leaving the theatre during the screening. That a storyteller has his heart in the right place does not necessarily make a good storyteller. Hubert Saupers view of The worst movie I saw in 2004 without a doubt. Several times I considered leaving the theatre during the screening. That a storyteller has his heart in the right place does not necessarily make a good storyteller. Hubert Saupers view of Africas problems are at best naive, but on top of that this movie rambles on never focusing on any one issue. It completely lacks any focus and the editing is amateurish to boot. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful
10
KirkB.Nov 1, 2005
A harrowing and deeply humane expose of the effects of globalisation on Tanzania. Sauper makes connections between everything, explains how, finally, we as viewers are part of the story, and does so without any voiceover, relying on a A harrowing and deeply humane expose of the effects of globalisation on Tanzania. Sauper makes connections between everything, explains how, finally, we as viewers are part of the story, and does so without any voiceover, relying on a compelling series of interviews and the most searing and disturbing images I have encountered as a movie goer. This film is wholly analytical in the best of documentary traditions, and at the same time completely captivating. Everyone should see this movie. Expand
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9
DevinB.Sep 12, 2005
The comments of Sagal and Rad are typical, and illustrate an intresting point about the ideology of some Americans. This film is factual, non-partisan, and documentary. However, since it displays a harsh reality with a rational eye, some The comments of Sagal and Rad are typical, and illustrate an intresting point about the ideology of some Americans. This film is factual, non-partisan, and documentary. However, since it displays a harsh reality with a rational eye, some will label it left-wing. The world is not always a pretty place, and globalization and capitalism have wraught some pretty horrific consequences on parts of the undeveloped world. To acknowedge these facts is neither left-wing nor right-wing, but to dismiss as partisan an important statement of culture and science is ignorant and racist. Of course, however, any film that's not completely apologetic to the United States at all times, any analysis that doesn't cater to the White House party line of the moment, any documentary that forces us to face difficult world problems rather than blaming the victims....must be left wing, according to some people. But the truth is not partisan. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful
10
stevel.Aug 31, 2005
I can't imagine how the two viewers who saw this movie and "hated" it for being slanted, left-wing biased and filled with falsehoods, actually know anything about Africa. In fact, Tanzania is not ruled by dictators, but by an I can't imagine how the two viewers who saw this movie and "hated" it for being slanted, left-wing biased and filled with falsehoods, actually know anything about Africa. In fact, Tanzania is not ruled by dictators, but by an administration unfamiliar with and new to democracy, one of which the Western world is none to quick to take advantage of. This movie is devastating and should be required viewing for everyone. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful
0
SagalA.Aug 26, 2005
Twisted, exploitative, voyeuristic - and most of all, feeble. No analysis whatsoever - about the ecology or the economy. So what if the small-town Russian pilots were bringing in weapons? What's your point? Why film a dying woman say "I Twisted, exploitative, voyeuristic - and most of all, feeble. No analysis whatsoever - about the ecology or the economy. So what if the small-town Russian pilots were bringing in weapons? What's your point? Why film a dying woman say "I can't eat anymore?" More dangerous a thousand-fold than the phantom weapons being smuggled into Africa are films like this one. You make me sick, Mr. Sauper. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful
1
RadI.Aug 23, 2005
Typically twisted left wing propanganda. Blame America first. These people ae ruled by savage dictators. Could that have something to do with it? Duh!!!
0 of 0 users found this helpful