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Mixed or average reviews - based on 20 Critics What's this?

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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 20
  2. Negative: 0 out of 20
  1. Reviewed by: Eric Kohn
    Nov 14, 2013
    83
    Schroeder tracks the end of innocence in much the same way that the strip captured it each time out. Unlike "Salinger," he hardly makes a spectacle out of Watterson's secluded tendencies. The pileup of interview subjects speak eloquently on his behalf.
  2. Reviewed by: Gary Goldstein
    Nov 14, 2013
    70
    The film, named for "Calvin" creator Bill Watterson, offers not only an in-depth look at the comic strip's unique influence but also a concise snapshot of the dwindling state of newspapers and their "funny pages."
  3. Reviewed by: Odie Henderson
    Nov 15, 2013
    63
    As they discuss "how much this strip meant to me," I got the sense that Dear Mr. Watterson was as uninterested in them as I was; they're not even identified.
  4. Reviewed by: Keith Uhlich
    Nov 12, 2013
    60
    Still, if any modern strip is worthy of an extended, Hobbes-style tongue bath, it’s this one.
  5. Reviewed by: Bilge Ebiri
    Nov 18, 2013
    50
    Look, Dear Mr. Watterson is a nice movie. Calvin & Hobbes fans may get a kick out of it. But it falls squarely into the promotional genre of documentary filmmaking — the same way so many music docs nowadays seem to be just movies about how awesome the director’s favorite band is.
  6. Reviewed by: Nicolas Rapold
    Nov 14, 2013
    50
    But viewers looking to learn more about Mr. Watterson and his creation than what’s contained in his Wikipedia entry may come away as hopped-up with impatience as Calvin when confronted by parental indifference.
  7. Reviewed by: Elizabeth Weitzman
    Nov 14, 2013
    40
    The deeply private, intensely ideological and undeniably brilliant Watterson would make an absolutely fascinating subject. But director Joel Allen Schroeder has no access to him. So instead he talks a lot about how much he loves “Calvin and Hobbes” and then invites other fans to do the same.

See all 20 Critic Reviews