User Score
7.9

Generally favorable reviews- based on 8 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 6 out of 8
  2. Negative: 1 out of 8
Watch On

Review this movie

  1. Your Score
    0 out of 10
    Rate this:
    • 10
    • 9
    • 8
    • 7
    • 6
    • 5
    • 4
    • 3
    • 2
    • 1
    • 0
    • 0
  1. Submit
  2. Check Spelling
  1. J.A.
    Feb 5, 2004
    9
    Interesting, human, clever, and funny. How many of those do we get any more?
  2. BenH.
    Apr 10, 2002
    10
    Engaging character study from start to finish. A well made slice of life.
  3. JimK.
    Dec 20, 2004
    10
    A great movie, wholesome and truly moving, it reminds us of our own humanity with the story of man's suffering and compassion. Forster and Walberg are very well developed characters who really make the movie one of great quality.....rare in this day and age.
  4. DeanR.
    Mar 14, 2003
    10
    A refreshing shock of a movie, with a credible plot, virutally unheard of in today's Hollywood, eerily believable in fact. Pitch perfect performances by Robert Forster, as a lifelong road warrior who plays mentor in the wholesale diamond business to a disheveled Donnie Walberg who doesn't miss a cue either. Bess Armstrong, as Forster's love interest comes to the film late A refreshing shock of a movie, with a credible plot, virutally unheard of in today's Hollywood, eerily believable in fact. Pitch perfect performances by Robert Forster, as a lifelong road warrior who plays mentor in the wholesale diamond business to a disheveled Donnie Walberg who doesn't miss a cue either. Bess Armstrong, as Forster's love interest comes to the film late but grabs your attention with a Silky Sullivan move in the stretch which dazzles as well. This is film making and Daniel M. Cohen (writer/director) should be on everyone's A list. Highly recommended. Expand
Metascore
78

Generally favorable reviews - based on 20 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 16 out of 20
  2. Negative: 0 out of 20
  1. Diamond Men's potential as a diamond in the rough turn out to be more "rough" than "diamond."
  2. Loses its way in a crime-movie subplot and a less-than-believable love affair.
  3. Forster carries the movie with an effortless grace and professionalism, creating a character of surprising nobility who is the very opposite of the Willy Loman caricature that's been the de rigueur salesman stereotype in movies of the past 50 years.