Double Take Image
Metascore
66

Generally favorable reviews - based on 6 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: Johan Grimonprez’s ingenious documentary/fiction hybrid — a meditation on identity, filmmaking, power and paranoia — looks at Alfred Hitchcock’s late 50s and early 60s film against the climate of Cold War-era political anxiety. Using a meticulous array of archive footage – as well as a storyJohan Grimonprez’s ingenious documentary/fiction hybrid — a meditation on identity, filmmaking, power and paranoia — looks at Alfred Hitchcock’s late 50s and early 60s film against the climate of Cold War-era political anxiety. Using a meticulous array of archive footage – as well as a story by novelist Tom McCarthy about Hitchcock encountering his double during production of The Birds – Grimonprez traces the global rise of fear as a commodity, examining modern history through the lens of mass media, advertising and Hollywood. (Kino International) Expand
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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 6
  2. Negative: 0 out of 6
  1. 88
    Like the Master of Suspense's best films, Double Take (which makes great use of Bernard Herrmann's haunting "Psycho" score) is an intellectual puzzle that also works as a thoroughly accessible entertainment.
  2. Reviewed by: Ian Freer
    80
    A documentary that practically defies description, Grimonprez's film is playful, provocative and very, very watchable.
  3. 70
    Although it is composed mainly of archival footage and touches on a great many actual events, Double Take, as you may already have gathered, is not quite a documentary. It is, instead, a meditation on a series of loosely related themes drawn together, somewhat tenuously, by the familiar yet elusive sensibility that Hitchcock brought to Hollywood and then to American television.
  4. Reviewed by: Justin Lowe
    70
    Despite its many ominous implications, Grimonprez also infuses Double Take with sly wit, inserting scenes from the TV program showcasing Hitchcock's wry sense of humor and the exaggerated domesticity of commercials sponsored by Folgers Coffee.
  5. 67
    Any 15-minute stretch of Double Take proves as enlightening as any other--more like a museum installation than a movie.
  6. It’s a neurotic treatise that simply adds to our cultural dementia instead of illuminating it.