Columbia Pictures | Release Date: August 13, 2010
4.8
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Mixed or average reviews based on 93 Ratings
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Positive:
28
Mixed:
37
Negative:
28
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7
nunubell68Aug 13, 2010
The movie felt a bit slow to start but overall I enjoyed it. It was a "make you think" kind of movie. Julia Roberts is beauiful as always and the acting was good.
1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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8
mpcbuddhaAug 14, 2010
Had heard about the book, but never read it. Thought it was a very good movie. Many people who go see the movie may not enjoy it for the fact they are not or have never been at a point in their lives where it is time to move along toHad heard about the book, but never read it. Thought it was a very good movie. Many people who go see the movie may not enjoy it for the fact they are not or have never been at a point in their lives where it is time to move along to something more. Julia Roberts was excellent along with the rest of the cast. Very insightful, beautiful locales. Left the theater with a smile on my face. Will be buying the book to get the more detailed version. Go see it. Expand
1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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10
thebrickknightAug 15, 2010
I went into this movie with the intention of only getting laid for sitting through what I assumed was going to be a piece of colorful poop. However, this film ended up being the best film I've ever seen! From the very beginning I connectedI went into this movie with the intention of only getting laid for sitting through what I assumed was going to be a piece of colorful poop. However, this film ended up being the best film I've ever seen! From the very beginning I connected with Julia Roberts and up until the end of the film I didn't take my mind off of any of it. I have seen this movie two times already this weekend, and in this economy that is saying a lot! See it multiple times, you won't regret it! Expand
1 of 8 users found this helpful17
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7
ShiiraAug 18, 2010
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. "Eat Pray Love" would be easier to mock if author Elizabeth Gilbert wasn't a National Book Award nominee(for "The Last American Man"), and had both her fiction and non-fiction works cited by The New York Times as being "notable". So if you're going to be a hater, categorically labeling the memoirist as being narcissistic, the latest offender of the "me" lit boom, heed her credentials, because Gilbert's navel-gazing is not your garden variety navel-gazing, like that of a populist hack, or a self-proclaimed, self-help guru flake-turned scribe. Arguably, "Eat Pray Love" should be mentioned in the same breath as Stephen Daldry's "The Hours", in addition to its obvious genre classification: the "chick flick", and sub-genre: a woman goes on a journey of self-discovery(e.g. Audrey Welles' "Under the Tuscan Sun"). Make no mistake about it. Elizabeth Gilbert is a literary writer, albeit not of the same caliber as Virginia Woolf, she is literary within the context of her times; her books belonging to a lesser canon, but a canon of sorts, nevertheless. As played by Julia Roberts, the Pen/Hemingway Award finalist(for her 1997 short story collection "Pilgrims") has an ironical spirit about her, when you compare the real-life Gilbert with Ruth Thomas, the sedentary island heroine from the writer's warring lobster fishermen saga "Stern Men". The fictional Ruth, in spite of being exposed to boarding school, was content to eat shellfish, and someday marry a man who caught them. Thanks to "Eat Pray Love", the reader can't help but psychoanalyze Gilbert through her prior texts. At the time of the 2001 novel's publication, it's only natural to speculate that the then-married writer was trying to justify the institution of marriage, the pros of settling down, since Ruth chooses the island over the world(well, if you consider Maine, the world); or maybe, more accurately, Gilbert was simply revisiting her seventeen-year-old self, back when the younger lass believed in home and family. Both a journalist and a novelist, Gilbert, amidst the other Indians during the film adaptation's strongest chapter, "Pray", wears her reporter's hat while lending her ear to a local girl, bemoaning the fast-approaching date of her arranged marriage to a boy she's never met. True to form, objectivist form, Gilbert doesn't share her contemporaneous prejudices against matrimonial unions with the beseeching young woman, a terrified bride-to-be who probably wanted an enlightened opinion, a western opinion, but instead gets a disappointingly stock one. Concerning nuptials, Gilbert, a feminist, as demonstrated through her counter-traditional actions, in effect, lies to the girl, which presents an existential dichotomy of the highest order. On one hand, Gilbert doesn't want to come across like some ugly American, who disregards the sanctity of Hindu law, but still, as the girl's friend and mentor, speaking woman to woman, independent of the cultural divide that separates the east from the west, the older woman owes it to the young girl to consider rebellion. Although Gilbert proves time and time again to be a wonderful human being("Eat" is a lot of fun; Italy, a land of enchantment), she does, in this instance, come across as a hypocrite, but this flaw only makes her more interesting, since all artists live in their own moral universes, with its contradictions and blissful ignorance. Expand
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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10
LeoTs3181983Sep 3, 2010
This is one of Julia Roberts' best movies. It's the perfect movie for for relief from stress and anxiety. I'm definitely glad I saw it and everyone else should too.
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
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9
SecretAgentGalSep 19, 2010
Julia Roberts finds herself - and we rediscover her considerable talents - in a rare movie-is-better-than-the-book travel adventure, Eat Pray Love. Screenplay by director Ryan Murphy and Jennifer Salt redeems the navel-gazing memoir byJulia Roberts finds herself - and we rediscover her considerable talents - in a rare movie-is-better-than-the-book travel adventure, Eat Pray Love. Screenplay by director Ryan Murphy and Jennifer Salt redeems the navel-gazing memoir by Elizabeth Gilbert. Revealing an inner adventure that drags at first, the film soon falls into natural rhythm as a world traveler faces her inner demons and searches for love.

Best of all, Eat Pray Love stars a Julia Roberts who shows up in nearly every scene. Abundant screen time allows Roberts to inhabit her character Liz, weave us into her anger and frustration, and reveal a radiant, smiling beauty. There's no trace of the tight-assed Anna of Closer or Tess of Ocean's Eleven. Instead we could be watching Mystic Pizza's Daisy Arujo all grown up.

Roberts seems to be playing herself in the film which avoids becoming preachy or too New Agey. Instead Liz meets an array of honest, memorable characters as she learns to love herself during trips to Italy, India and Bali.

"Ruin is the path to transformation,"Â
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0 of 3 users found this helpful03
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7
jordiJan 2, 2013
Me esperaba más pero visualmente su espiritualidad es visualmente poética. Además Julia Roberts está guapísima. En Italia se muestra muy bien la comida, pero se olvidan de ella en la India y en Bali.Me esperaba más pero visualmente su espiritualidad es visualmente poética. Además Julia Roberts está guapísima. En Italia se muestra muy bien la comida, pero se olvidan de ella en la India y en Bali. Destacable como siempre Javier Bardem. Expand
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7
KatrinaDec 1, 2010
Julia Robertâ
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10
alpha444Dec 10, 2010
Tiresome plot made worse by Julia Roberts traditionally minimal acting. Roberts has always gotten by with smiles and wistful looks and not much else.It doesn't appear that's going to get her by anymore More of the same here with the camerasTiresome plot made worse by Julia Roberts traditionally minimal acting. Roberts has always gotten by with smiles and wistful looks and not much else.It doesn't appear that's going to get her by anymore More of the same here with the cameras panning to Roberts who always has that phony looking serene smile. Expand
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9
lukechristianscDec 19, 2015
This isn't a chick flick, it is about self-discovery, even though that Roberts (which is an odd casting chose) who looks nothing the real Elizabeth Gilbert, Roberts performance is incandescent and does a great job as the character. Co-writerThis isn't a chick flick, it is about self-discovery, even though that Roberts (which is an odd casting chose) who looks nothing the real Elizabeth Gilbert, Roberts performance is incandescent and does a great job as the character. Co-writer director Ryan Murphy (Running With Scissors) makes this film adaptation artsy and bright also makes the food look like ecstasy, Murphy and his screenwriter Jennifer Salt (Tempo) make this spiritual, relaxed. Writer Elizabeth Gilbert (played Julia Roberts) has reached a life crisis, without her husband Steven (Billy Grudup) realizing it they arrived in different and diverging places in their lives, Liz wants out of their marriage. While Liz and Steven are going their divorce papers, she meets an actor David Piccolo (James Franco) who meet while he's performing a stage play. After meeting him, her biggest problem she realizes is herself, earlier when a Balinese medicine man Ketut (Hadi Subiyanto who is amazing) gave her foretellings. So she maps out her journey. So Liz goes on an adventure to self-discovery first it's Italy where she she learns how to love food again the way she use to love it, then India to learn how to meditate and get some spiritual peace in her life, she meets Richard (Richard Jenkins) they start a friendship. The last part in her self discovery journey is Bolly, where she meets again Ketut to thank him, also give more insights in her life. As she was planning her geographic plan, she meets Felipe (Javier Bardem) they run into each other, they are both divorced they have a few things in common. Things don't go quite as planned. She gets lost by the end of her stay. Despite the Hollywood cliche's and the Hollywood film making, at times this feels like a different movie. Only in this movie in the middle, Jenkins gives his best Oscar performance despite his little screen time. The pacing is great at times a little bit rushed, it's predictable but who cares that's what Gilbert made out to make in her novel at times it's original. The character development is socko, Murphy and Salt successfully put character development in Jenkin's character despite his screen time and so does Bardem who is phenomenal. Grade A Expand
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