El Velador Image
Metascore
82

Universal acclaim - based on 5 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: From dusk to dawn El Velador accompanies Martin, the guardian angel whom, night after night, watches over the extravagant mausoleums of some of Mexico's most notorious Drug Lords. In the labyrinth of the cemetery, this film about violence without violence reminds us how, in the turmoil ofFrom dusk to dawn El Velador accompanies Martin, the guardian angel whom, night after night, watches over the extravagant mausoleums of some of Mexico's most notorious Drug Lords. In the labyrinth of the cemetery, this film about violence without violence reminds us how, in the turmoil of Mexico's bloodiest conflict since the Revolution, ordinary life persists and quietly defies the dead. (Altamura Films) Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 5
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 5
  3. Negative: 0 out of 5
  1. Reviewed by: Roger Ebert
    Jul 25, 2012
    88
    The Mexican drug cartels have inspired countless films, but never one as final as Natalia Almada's documentary El Velador.
  2. Reviewed by: Nick Schager
    Jun 11, 2012
    88
    El Velador doesn't pass judgment or manipulate emotionally, instead choosing simply to consider the arduousness of survival in a land wracked by slaughter.
  3. Reviewed by: Melissa Anderson
    Jun 12, 2012
    80
    El Velador still sharply conveys what life is like in a traumatized nation.
  4. Reviewed by: Stephen Holden
    Jun 13, 2012
    80
    Natalia Almada's eloquent documentary portrait of a sprawling graveyard in Culiacán, Mexico, in the northwestern state of Sinaloa. The rapidly expanding cemetery has become the burial ground of choice for the country's slain drug lords.
  5. Reviewed by: David Fear
    Jun 12, 2012
    80
    Filtering the fallout of Mexico's drug wars through the eyes of one stoic security guard, documentarian Natalia Almada (El General) avoids the head-on journalistic approach and emerges with something far more impressive: a piece of lyrical, sideways social reportage that still connects an astounding number of dots.
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  2. Mixed: 0 out of
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