Evil Dead

Metascore
57

Mixed or average reviews - based on 38 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 38
  2. Negative: 3 out of 38

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Critic Reviews

  1. Reviewed by: Nigel Floyd
    Apr 29, 2013
    60
    Despite much old-school splatter, it’s seldom frightening and oddly unfunny.
  2. Reviewed by: Peter Bradshaw
    Apr 19, 2013
    60
    It is nowhere near as creepy as the recent indie horror "V/H/S," but it is a full-bloodedly grisly and macabre film that zaps over a few scares.
  3. Reviewed by: Matt Glasby
    Apr 15, 2013
    60
    Closer to Eli Roth than Sam Raimi, this brutal retread combines J-horror atmospherics with torture-porn kills. It’s more evisceration than invention but at least has the courage of its bloody-minded convictions.
  4. Reviewed by: Simon Crook
    Apr 15, 2013
    60
    Prepare yourself for a shock: a horror remake that, at its best, manages to recapture the original’s hardcore nastiness. It could certainly do with laughing at itself a bit more, though.
  5. Reviewed by: Manohla Dargis
    Apr 4, 2013
    60
    Doesn’t have the original’s wooden performances, puffy clothes and hairdos or its amusingly crude special effects, but it does share its blood lust.
  6. Reviewed by: Bill Goodykoontz
    Apr 4, 2013
    60
    There is nothing about Evil Dead as groundbreaking as Raimi’s films (particularly the first two). But it’s smarter and better done than a lot of what’s come since those movies were made, which is to say there is at least some thought behind the killings.
  7. Reviewed by: Elizabeth Weitzman
    Apr 4, 2013
    60
    Though Alvarez keeps us watching, he takes no real chances. Buried under all those enthusiastically mangled bodies is the comfort of familiarity. He may have intended to remake a single film, but we’ve seen this movie countless times before.
  8. Reviewed by: Keith Uhlich
    Apr 2, 2013
    60
    What really matters is seeing these pretty people get put through the gory wringer, and once the unholy spirit comes calling, Evil Dead more than delivers.
  9. 50
    The passing of the torch from Raimi to Alvarez is not a momentous occasion. In the end, who really cares? Five years from now, will you want to watch this bloody $14 million extravaganza or Raimi’s shoestring original, which was Amateur Hour elevated to pop art?
  10. Reviewed by: Tom Russo
    Apr 7, 2013
    50
    Are we really looking to Evil Dead for gnarly possessions played straight? That’s what Alvarez gives us for an overlong stretch, until his reinterpretation of the malevolent-hand gag kicks off a last act that’s more freewheelingly, twistedly grisly. (Don’t skip the credits, because the fan-energizing momentum peaks at the very end.)
  11. Reviewed by: Rene Rodriguez
    Apr 4, 2013
    50
    Evil Dead is just a well-made gross-out, and it's kind of a bummer.
  12. Reviewed by: Michael O'Sullivan
    Apr 4, 2013
    50
    More stomach-churning than soul-chilling. The list of on-screen atrocities includes attacks by nail gun, electric carving knife, chain saw, shotgun, crowbar and chunk of ceramic from a broken toilet tank, used as a crude bludgeon.
  13. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    Apr 4, 2013
    50
    Goes overboard on the gruesome and scrimps on humor. Raimi's "Drag Me to Hell" was a much funnierchill-fest.
  14. Reviewed by: James Berardinelli
    Apr 4, 2013
    50
    This isn't just a horror movie with gore - it's a gore movie, period. Blood is its raison d'etre. It's not scary. It's not shocking. It just wallows in viscera. Ho-hum. Pass the ketchup.
  15. Reviewed by: Michael Phillips
    Apr 4, 2013
    50
    Evil Dead offers the core audience for modern horror plenty of reasons to jump, and then settle back, tensely, while awaiting the next idiotic trip down to the cellar beneath the demon-infested cabin in the woods.
  16. Reviewed by: Cory Everett
    Mar 10, 2013
    42
    Featuring truly shocking levels of violence but none of the wit or fun of the original, the new Evil Dead is mostly a dud.
  17. Reviewed by: Mike Scott
    Apr 5, 2013
    40
    Because while it can boast of some truly extraordinary special effects -- stomach-churning, face-hacking, arm-slicing visual effects, the kind that are sure to titillate the gleefully twisted -- this Evil Dead is far more gruesome than awesome.
User Score
7.3

Generally favorable reviews- based on 536 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 25 out of 173
  1. Apr 5, 2013
    10
    What can I say about this other than it's amazing? It's everything you want in a horror film. It's bloody, gory, and disgusting all in a goodWhat can I say about this other than it's amazing? It's everything you want in a horror film. It's bloody, gory, and disgusting all in a good way. It never fails to keep a creepy time to it throughout the film. It all looks just so realistic too. There's no CGI. Only practical effects which makes it 10 times better. I'll probably see this movie 3 more times while it's in theaters Full Review »
  2. Apr 5, 2013
    8
    This remake of the 1981 classic really delivers. It's very entertaining in a scary sense and in a gory sense. The only real problem about thisThis remake of the 1981 classic really delivers. It's very entertaining in a scary sense and in a gory sense. The only real problem about this movie is that it's too short. An amazing horror thriller like this should be at least 2 hours long. Not 91 minutes. Just too short. Overall, it's a scary/gory good time you'll have at the movies this year. Full Review »
  3. Apr 6, 2013
    3
    *posted on IMDB as well* When the remake of the 1981 horror classic "The Evil Dead" was announced in late 2011, fans of the series reacted,*posted on IMDB as well* When the remake of the 1981 horror classic "The Evil Dead" was announced in late 2011, fans of the series reacted, unsurprisingly, with revulsion. At the heart of their outrage lay a simple question: Why? How could a remake possibly improve upon the original? The first film's charm had much to do with its shoestring budget and utter lack of prestige. The cast and crew were a ragtag group of amateurs who essentially had no clue what they were doing. The filming process was notoriously unpleasant, requiring the team to live in a primitive log-cabin in the backwoods of Eastern Tennessee. It shouldn't have worked. And yet, when The Evil Dead hit theaters, it won over audiences across the world with its simplistic, clumsy charm and unique sense of humor--not to mention its pioneering camera work and brilliant practical effects. It paved the way for a decade of ultra-violent, low budget horror movies (either the best thing to happen to the genre or the worst, depending on who you're talking to.) Few products of the medium have ever enjoyed such influence.

    Though a more technically advanced film, Fede Alvarez' 2013 remake--backed, disappointingly, by Raimi and Campbell themselves-- is as shoddy a production as the original, but without the charm and humor to redeem it. The fundamental problem with Alvarez' version (and Diablo Cody's reworking of the script) is that it approaches the material with ludicrous self seriousness, thus making itself vulnerable to more intense scrutiny, against which it has little hope of defense. The film begins promisingly enough, opening with a disturbing scene of father-daughter filicide, but immediately tumbles downhill when the meat of the plot (what little there is) is revealed. The premise is this: A group of five twenty-somethings treks out into the woods for a high school reunion/intervention, hoping to permanently cure Mia (Jane Levy) of her heroin addiction. They hole up in Mia and her brother David's (Shiloh Fernandez) decrepit family cottage and steel themselves for the worst of the withdrawal symptoms to set in. However, their priorities soon shift when Eric (Lou Taylor Pucci) discovers a copy of the Necronomicon in the basement (wrapped in barbed wire, bound in human skin, and with explicit admonishments written in bold red letters upon its pages) and recites the exact words the book warns him not to recite under any circumstance. With this incantation, a portal into the world of the dead and the damned is opened. What follows thereafter should, by all rights, be an entertaining, gory romp through the swamps. Instead, we are treated to seventy minutes of unrelenting stupidity and bad acting. The worst offender by far is the feebleminded David, our lackluster stand in for Bruce Campbell's Ash, who, for three quarters of the movie, simply can't get it through his thick skull that his sister has been possessed by a demon. He seems to think that telekinesis, dramatic drops in vocal pitch, and Linda Blair-esque neck twitches are typical symptoms of heroin withdrawal. His dimwitted attempts to contain the situation are extraordinarily frustrating to watch, as is the extreme gullibility of the other characters. How many times will these fools fall for the old "I'm not a demon!" trick? Make a drinking game out of it. You'll be wasted long before the final act.

    Again, all of these transgressions would be more forgivable if the movie didn't take itself so dang seriously. But there's nary an amusing one-liner or a hint of self-awareness to get us through this study in tedium and banality. Even the violence is disappointing--or at least it failed to impress this seasoned genre enthusiast. Sure, there's a cool scene with a nail gun, and a few cringe inducing moments involving syringes, electric meat slicers, and boiling hot water, but it all feels a little been-there-done-that. Recent films that top Evil Dead in the gore department include Slither, Feast, Cabin Fever, Hostel, and High Tension, among others. Check those out instead.

    Here's hoping the "Carrie" remake fares a little better.
    Full Review »