Metascore
57

Mixed or average reviews - based on 38 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 38
  2. Negative: 3 out of 38
  1. Reviewed by: Richard Roeper
    Apr 3, 2013
    25
    This isn't a strict remake of Sam Raimi's hugely influential 1981 horror classic, but it does include the basic framework and some visual nods to the original. On its own, it's an irredeemable, sadistic torture chamber reveling in the bloody, cringe-inducing deaths of some of the stupidest people ever to spend a rainy night in a remote cabin in the woods.
  2. Reviewed by: Lou Lumenick
    Apr 4, 2013
    25
    Though it tries — with a much too heavy hand — the new Evil Dead is far less humorous than its predecessor.
  3. Reviewed by: Mick LaSalle
    Apr 4, 2013
    25
    This remake of the 1981 horror classic starts well, but it soon degenerates into tiresome shock gore that overstays its welcome, despite the film's modest run time. Jane Levy as a heroin addict going through withdrawal is the one bright spot.
User Score
7.4

Generally favorable reviews- based on 467 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 22 out of 163
  1. Apr 5, 2013
    10
    What can I say about this other than it's amazing? It's everything you want in a horror film. It's bloody, gory, and disgusting all in a good way. It never fails to keep a creepy time to it throughout the film. It all looks just so realistic too. There's no CGI. Only practical effects which makes it 10 times better. I'll probably see this movie 3 more times while it's in theaters Full Review »
  2. Apr 5, 2013
    8
    This remake of the 1981 classic really delivers. It's very entertaining in a scary sense and in a gory sense. The only real problem about this movie is that it's too short. An amazing horror thriller like this should be at least 2 hours long. Not 91 minutes. Just too short. Overall, it's a scary/gory good time you'll have at the movies this year. Full Review »
  3. Apr 6, 2013
    3
    *posted on IMDB as well* When the remake of the 1981 horror classic "The Evil Dead" was announced in late 2011, fans of the series reacted, unsurprisingly, with revulsion. At the heart of their outrage lay a simple question: Why? How could a remake possibly improve upon the original? The first film's charm had much to do with its shoestring budget and utter lack of prestige. The cast and crew were a ragtag group of amateurs who essentially had no clue what they were doing. The filming process was notoriously unpleasant, requiring the team to live in a primitive log-cabin in the backwoods of Eastern Tennessee. It shouldn't have worked. And yet, when The Evil Dead hit theaters, it won over audiences across the world with its simplistic, clumsy charm and unique sense of humor--not to mention its pioneering camera work and brilliant practical effects. It paved the way for a decade of ultra-violent, low budget horror movies (either the best thing to happen to the genre or the worst, depending on who you're talking to.) Few products of the medium have ever enjoyed such influence.

    Though a more technically advanced film, Fede Alvarez' 2013 remake--backed, disappointingly, by Raimi and Campbell themselves-- is as shoddy a production as the original, but without the charm and humor to redeem it. The fundamental problem with Alvarez' version (and Diablo Cody's reworking of the script) is that it approaches the material with ludicrous self seriousness, thus making itself vulnerable to more intense scrutiny, against which it has little hope of defense. The film begins promisingly enough, opening with a disturbing scene of father-daughter filicide, but immediately tumbles downhill when the meat of the plot (what little there is) is revealed. The premise is this: A group of five twenty-somethings treks out into the woods for a high school reunion/intervention, hoping to permanently cure Mia (Jane Levy) of her heroin addiction. They hole up in Mia and her brother David's (Shiloh Fernandez) decrepit family cottage and steel themselves for the worst of the withdrawal symptoms to set in. However, their priorities soon shift when Eric (Lou Taylor Pucci) discovers a copy of the Necronomicon in the basement (wrapped in barbed wire, bound in human skin, and with explicit admonishments written in bold red letters upon its pages) and recites the exact words the book warns him not to recite under any circumstance. With this incantation, a portal into the world of the dead and the damned is opened. What follows thereafter should, by all rights, be an entertaining, gory romp through the swamps. Instead, we are treated to seventy minutes of unrelenting stupidity and bad acting. The worst offender by far is the feebleminded David, our lackluster stand in for Bruce Campbell's Ash, who, for three quarters of the movie, simply can't get it through his thick skull that his sister has been possessed by a demon. He seems to think that telekinesis, dramatic drops in vocal pitch, and Linda Blair-esque neck twitches are typical symptoms of heroin withdrawal. His dimwitted attempts to contain the situation are extraordinarily frustrating to watch, as is the extreme gullibility of the other characters. How many times will these fools fall for the old "I'm not a demon!" trick? Make a drinking game out of it. You'll be wasted long before the final act.

    Again, all of these transgressions would be more forgivable if the movie didn't take itself so dang seriously. But there's nary an amusing one-liner or a hint of self-awareness to get us through this study in tedium and banality. Even the violence is disappointing--or at least it failed to impress this seasoned genre enthusiast. Sure, there's a cool scene with a nail gun, and a few cringe inducing moments involving syringes, electric meat slicers, and boiling hot water, but it all feels a little been-there-done-that. Recent films that top Evil Dead in the gore department include Slither, Feast, Cabin Fever, Hostel, and High Tension, among others. Check those out instead.

    Here's hoping the "Carrie" remake fares a little better.
    Full Review »