Lopert Pictures Corporation | Release Date: October 31, 2003
8.6
USER SCORE
Universal acclaim based on 22 Ratings
USER RATING DISTRIBUTION
Positive:
20
Mixed:
1
Negative:
1
Watch Now
Stream On
Review this movie
VOTE NOW
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Check box if your review contains spoilers 0 characters (5000 max)
8
SpangleOct 1, 2016
The age old question to who let the dogs out has been answered. It was Christiane (Edith Scob) the entire time. Somebody should let the Baha Men know that their answer came 40 years before the song.

This haunting French film from director
The age old question to who let the dogs out has been answered. It was Christiane (Edith Scob) the entire time. Somebody should let the Baha Men know that their answer came 40 years before the song.

This haunting French film from director Georges Franju is a classic for good reason. It may be slow, but it feels relatively devoid of classic horror cliches. Rather, Eyes Without a Face is a film truly about guilt, emotional trauma, and depression. Like a black cloud, the atmosphere hangs over this film and it proves to be quite unsettling, even if it never downright scary. Rather, it is a thoroughly and subtly haunting experience that feels wholly unique and original.

With an odd score that often likes annoying carousel music, Eyes Without a Face is a film determined to buck expectations. By the end, the once annoying carousel music turns into a menacing sound due to the implication about what is set to begin when it is heard. The same can be said about the general plot. It honestly sneaks up on you. While I knew what the film is about, the true horror of this film is revealed in the details as you realize that Doctor Genessier (Pierre Brasseur) sincerely believes he must do this for Christiane. He is obviously a sick individual, but also one suffering greatly from grief and trauma over the situation he caused for his beloved daughter. Though one has to be sick to go to these lengths, the emotional trauma and helplessness he feels is intensely relatable.

That said, the scene in which he actually takes off a girl's face is pure horror. While much of the film can be more accurately described as psychological horror, this one sequence puts it over the edge. So calculated, so graphic, and so horrifying to think of the ramifications of this sequence, I am weak so I had to look away, but it was still traumatic. The sequence is that good. This same trauma is shown at the end when Christiane frees her father's last captive and the dogs he experimented upon. Given her great levels of depression, one must assume that Christiane has finally given up all hope and will kill herself at long last. The sheer hopelessness of this element of the film really underscores its balance between true horror and a film that explores the depths one can be driven to from grief.

A classic of the genre, Eyes Without a Face has had clear influence on later films (Halloween, Face/Off for example) and with good reason. It can be a bit slow a times, but is more than rewarding and proves to be a highly haunting experience when it is all said and done.
Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews
9
EpicLadySpongeApr 7, 2016
A movie without a face. Eyes Without a Face represents the unimaginable pain of living without a face while they still have eyes to see and keep track in incoming people in the way.
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
All this user's reviews