Metascore
71

Generally favorable reviews - based on 25 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 21 out of 25
  2. Negative: 0 out of 25
  1. Factotum is so sly and low-key hilarious that anybody can be in on the joke.
  2. 89
    Factotum, for all its grim grind, is funny-serious, and smart-stupid. Just like you after four beers, and me after eight.
User Score
6.3

Generally favorable reviews- based on 20 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 13
  2. Negative: 4 out of 13
  1. Feb 17, 2014
    9
    Funny, sad, and nice to look at, this film has a great small cast. Has a languid pace but is never boring. The changes in fortune of the theFunny, sad, and nice to look at, this film has a great small cast. Has a languid pace but is never boring. The changes in fortune of the the protagonist Henry, an alcoholic writer, is always on the precipice of abject failure or (relative) success. Matt Dillon seems very authentic, very believable in his role. Stands a second viewing. Full Review »
  2. ChrisM.
    May 17, 2007
    0
    Very rarely do I turn something off before the end but was extremely tempted. The whole thing tries so hard it is painful. Bukowski's Very rarely do I turn something off before the end but was extremely tempted. The whole thing tries so hard it is painful. Bukowski's writing has got some merit, this film has none. Full Review »
  3. ChadS.
    Apr 19, 2007
    7
    When a man hits a woman, there's usually a second time. In "Factotum", it's one punch thrown by Henry(Matt Dillon), one thud on the When a man hits a woman, there's usually a second time. In "Factotum", it's one punch thrown by Henry(Matt Dillon), one thud on the floor by Jan the thud-maker(Lili Taylor). Unlike "Walk the Line"(the whitewashed biopic of country legend Johnny Cash), the filmmaker doesn't want to portray their iconoclastic subject(Charles Bukowski) as a saint; this is an indie, after all, "Factotum" needs street(or at least, Sundance street) cred. But surely Henry Chinaski is prone to more than one violent outburst if he's some unrelenting drunk who can't hold onto a job. No drunk just hits the bottle; he'll hit jukeboxes, glass windows, and the corporeal flesh of bar patrons and fifty-cent whores alike, especially the fifty-cent whores. "Factotum" is episodic; it's nothing more than a meandering anthology of the women Henry happens to be shacked up with as he lurches from bar to crappy job to bar. Lucid or not, Bukowski/Chinaski had enough clarity to write "Factotum", the memoir that is the basis for this agreeable depiction of the infamous poet laureate of the streets. Dillon is good, but not great as Chinaski; or maybe, the filmmaker is at fault; maybe, he fell into temptation to myth-make. In place of genuine angst and other degrees of implosive behavior, he chose to uphold the romantic notion of a writer victimized by stampeding pink elephants; the pachyderms of proof. The elephants need thicker hides. Chinaski needs to be more tortured; more "Bukowski-in-a-china-shop"-like. Full Review »