Metascore
65

Generally favorable reviews - based on 16 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 10 out of 16
  2. Negative: 1 out of 16
  1. Reviewed by: Mark Jenkins
    Nov 15, 2013
    60
    German history and culture are among Sokurov's concerns in this visually compelling, intellectually scattershot movie.
  2. Reviewed by: Peter Bradshaw
    Nov 2, 2013
    60
    This Faust is part bad dream, part music-less opera: sometimes muted and numb, though with hallucinatory flashes of fear.
  3. Reviewed by: Dave Calhoun
    Nov 2, 2013
    60
    It has a rigorous, even unrelenting, grey, green and brown palette and, narratively, it’s tough to penetrate.
  4. Reviewed by: Scott Tobias
    Nov 14, 2013
    40
    Freely adapted from Goethe’s two-part play, Sokurov’s Faust is a work of crushing tedium, relieved only by the spare moments of beauty that pop out like dandelions in a washed-out landscape of oppression and grotesquerie.
  5. Reviewed by: Jay Weissberg
    Nov 2, 2013
    40
    [A] film with a maddeningly opaque narrative and a brutalizing cascade of nonstop verbiage.
User Score
8.7

Universal acclaim- based on 6 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 1
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 1
  3. Negative: 0 out of 1
  1. Dec 4, 2013
    9
    Audacious, outrageous and pretty brilliant, Sokurov's FAUST is like a Bruegel painting come to life but then the director continually skewsAudacious, outrageous and pretty brilliant, Sokurov's FAUST is like a Bruegel painting come to life but then the director continually skews reality through rapid lens and color changes. The film is at once realistic and totally artificial. Recalling the dictates and style of German regie theater, Sokurov brings the aesthetic to film brilliantly. But unlike Goethe's source material in which knowledge is gold, Sokurov takes us into a world in which life and death don't really matter. Knowledge and stupidly are equally unimportant and nothing has any meaning. FAUST is a challenging and rewarding film that dazzles in its pessimism. Full Review »