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9.0

Universal acclaim- based on 1041 Ratings

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  1. Apr 17, 2015
    10
    a picture perfect satire of rebellion in the low levels of american society, this film's cult status has indeed glorified everyone's expectations in the years that followed. superb directed, some cool acting, and a mind-blowing script its the number one coming of age American new wave that mixes and twists up everything a young viewer wants to see and make it into something cool, and tendsa picture perfect satire of rebellion in the low levels of american society, this film's cult status has indeed glorified everyone's expectations in the years that followed. superb directed, some cool acting, and a mind-blowing script its the number one coming of age American new wave that mixes and twists up everything a young viewer wants to see and make it into something cool, and tends to hit back at Chuck Palaniuk's version of a society littered with high ranking lifestyles ,community advertisements, and unpleasant businesses with a very pissed off underworld ready to rise up from the filth and fight back against the life that oppresses them.

    A underrated classical mosaic, that mashes up Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange with Hitchcock's Strangers on A Train that will make you cringe with more graphic violence you haven't seen in any other film or adult rated comic

    This Is Your Life and its Ending One Minute at A Time....... Unless If Theres Another Option
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  2. Apr 19, 2015
    10
    Suffering a boiling wave of utterly predictable tabloid controversy, This Monstrous Movie (® Daily Mail) seems to be 1999's Crash/NBK/Reservoir Dogs, a film so devastatingly toxic that its very existence is not only responsible for every post-kebab scuffle, but the soaring divorce rate, teenage alcoholism and the terminal inadequacy of frozen pizza.

    In fact, though definitely not one
    Suffering a boiling wave of utterly predictable tabloid controversy, This Monstrous Movie (® Daily Mail) seems to be 1999's Crash/NBK/Reservoir Dogs, a film so devastatingly toxic that its very existence is not only responsible for every post-kebab scuffle, but the soaring divorce rate, teenage alcoholism and the terminal inadequacy of frozen pizza.

    In fact, though definitely not one for the kiddiewinks, Fincher's film is a molasses-black comedy shot through with his blistering, hyper-kinetic style, a score that punches you in the chest, and standout performances from Pitt and Norton. And sadly, it's afflicted with one flaw that just ejects it from the masterpiece category.

    Our narrator, 'Jack' (Norton), is a directionless everybloke who, when not weathering humiliating chewings-out at work, exists as an inadequate nighthawk, trying to cure his chronic insomnia by fixing on the synthetic sympathy of assorted nocturnal self-help groups. Solace is finally found with his head enveloped in a sobbing Meatloaf's pendulous **** **** while attending a support group for men with testicular cancer (told you this was black). The symbolism couldn't be clearer - if Jack isn't actually ball-less, he might as well be.

    Something obviously has to give, and it does when Jack meets Tyler Durden (Pitt) on the plane home from a business trip. He arrives back at his apartment to find it in ruins - having mysteriously exploded in a fiery Armageddon of Ikea - so he calls Tyler, who invites him to crash round his place. And then invites him to punch him in the kisser. Which he does, and soon they're scrapping like squaddies in the car park, and enjoying it - the simple act of mano-a-mano rucking reminding Jack not only that he's alive, but that he's a he.

    The craze spreads, and fight clubs start springing up all over the country with Tyler as their charismatic leader. But Tyler has a hidden agenda, and before Jack knows it, he's extending his organisation's activities into surreal random acts of anti-capitalist terrorism - the highly secret Project Mayhem. Starbucks coffee houses are razed. Corporate art is demolished. And rich, vain women have their own liposuctioned lard sold back to them as classy soap.

    There are so many ways to read Fight Club that it's almost impossible to know where to start. Is it a fascistic call to action for a generation of dickless wonders? A homoerotic love story in which Jack is reintroduced to his nads before being carried off in Tyler's pneumatic arms? A satire on modern feminism's cartoonish views of what men are like, or...? Well, have a go yourself. It's half the fun.

    The other half is Fincher's scorching style. From an opening title sequence that out-Sevens Seven's, he presents a maelstrom of celluloid sorcery. Flash cuts, subliminal images, fake cue dots, jumping film... it's a howling monster of a movie that virtually sticks its ravening snout out of the screen and bites you.

    Norton is as fine as ever, but Pitt is the standout, lending Tyler a beguiling sense of glamour and danger, while the fights themselves - vicious brawls accompanied by the sound of cracking bones - herald the movie's most subversive image: men's blood-drenched, caved-in heads sporting huge, almost post-coital, smiles.

    But then it starts to go awry. From the moment Project Mayhem is instituted, some of the sly blackness leaks out, and after a slew of implausibilities in the last half hour - including a twist out of the bottom of a cornflakes packet - it degenerates into an entertaining but vacuous comedy. Finally, having lost the courage of its gleefully nasty convictions, it concludes with a tiny burp of a bad gag. In the end, Fincher's brilliant film is, ironically, short in the cojones department - and if he wants to argue about it, we'd be happy to. Outside.
    Fight Club is one movie that exactly caught the pre-millennial tension. Great performances, stunning visuals and a plot like nothing you've ever seen - One of the best films Ever!
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  3. Apr 19, 2015
    10
    Insurance drone Jack (Norton) can't sleep, and haunts self-help groups for fatal illnesses until he encounters Tyler Durden (Pitt), a charismatic anarchist who invites him to move into his decrepit house after his condo is blown up. Jack and Tyler have recreational fist-fights, which expand into an underground masculinist movement. However, cracks appear in the relationship as Tyler copsInsurance drone Jack (Norton) can't sleep, and haunts self-help groups for fatal illnesses until he encounters Tyler Durden (Pitt), a charismatic anarchist who invites him to move into his decrepit house after his condo is blown up. Jack and Tyler have recreational fist-fights, which expand into an underground masculinist movement. However, cracks appear in the relationship as Tyler cops off with a Goth bizarro (Bonham Carter) and his pranks go from subversive to near-homicidal.

    There are so many ways to read Fight Club that it's almost impossible to know where to start. Is it a fascistic call to action for a generation of dickless wonders? A homoerotic love story in which Jack is reintroduced to his nads before being carried off in Tyler's pneumatic arms? A satire on modern feminism's cartoonish views of what men are like, or...? Well, have a go yourself. It's half the fun.

    Fight Club is one movie that exactly caught the pre-millennial tension. Great performances, stunning visuals and a plot like nothing you've ever seen - one of the best films ever!
    Expand
  4. Apr 23, 2015
    10
    With its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact, Fight Club refuses to be ignored or dismissed. The experience lingers, demanding to be pondered and considered, and, unlike 95% of modern-dayWith its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact, Fight Club refuses to be ignored or dismissed. The experience lingers, demanding to be pondered and considered, and, unlike 95% of modern-day thrillers, there is a great deal here to think about and argue over. Fight Club presents an overload of thought-provoking material that works on so many levels as to offer grist for the mills of thousands of reviews, feature articles, and post-screening conversations.

    Pre-release interest in Fight Club was understandably high, primarily because of those involved with the project. Jim Uhls' script is based on an influential novel by Chuck Palahniuk (a book that, while not required material in schools, has consumed the free time of countless readers). The lead actor is the ever-popular Brad Pitt, who makes his strongest bid to date to shed his pretty boy image and don the mantle of a serious thespian. Those dubious about Pitt's ability to pull this off in the wake of his recent attempts in Seven Years in Tibet (which is briefly referenced as an in-joke during Fight Club) and Meet Joe Black will suffer a change of heart after seeing this film. Pitt's male co-star, Edward Norton, is widely recognized as one of the most intelligent and versatile performers of his generation. And Fight Club's director, David Fincher, has already made a huge artistic impression on movie-goers with only three features to his credit: Alien 3, Seven (starring Pitt), and The Game. Mix these elements together in Fox's publicity blender, and Fight Club will not carry the title of "Best Movie of 1999 That No One Saw."

    Told in a conventional fashion, Fight Club would still have been engaging. However, Fincher's gritty, restless style turns it into a visual masterpiece. The overall experience is every bit as surreal as watching Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange. This is a tale that unfolds in an eerie alternate universe where the melodies of life have the same rhythm as in ours but are in a different key. Fincher also shows just enough restraint that his flourishes seem like important parts of the storytelling method instead of gimmicks. And there are a lot of them. In one scene, a character's apartment is laid out like a page in a furniture catalog, complete with text blurbs superimposed on the screen describing the various pieces. There are occasional single frame interruptions that flash by so quickly that they may pass unnoticed. The film opens with a truly inventive close-up - one that literally gets under the skin. Also in play: a non-linear chronology, a voiceover by a narrator who might not be entirely reliable, frequent breaking of the fourth wall, and an occasional freeze-frame. As was true of Fincher's other three films, Fight Club is dark and fast-paced. There's not a lot of time for introspection. One could call this MTV style, but, unlike many equally frantic movies, there's a reason for each quick cut beyond preventing viewers from becoming bored.

    Perhaps the most discussed aspect of Fight Club will be its attitude towards and graphic depiction of violence. Even before the film's official premiere, voices have been raised claiming that the movie glorifies violence by portraying it as something positive. This was the complaint leveled against A Clockwork Orange, which, less than three decades after its controversial release, is universally regarded as a classic. There's no denying that Fight Club is a violent movie. Some sequences are so brutal that a portion of the viewing audience will turn away. (The scene that caused me to wince was when one character reached into his mouth and pulled out a loose tooth.) But the purpose of showing all this bloody pummeling is to make a telling point about the bestial nature of man and what can happen when the numbing effects of day-to-day drudgery cause people to go a little crazy. The men who become members of Fight Club are victims of the dehumanizing and desensitizing power of modern-day society. They have become cogs in a wheel. The only way they can regain a sense of individuality is by getting in touch with the primal, barbaric instincts of pain and violence.

    It remains to be seen whether Fight Club will generate any Oscars. The strength of the writing, direction, and acting justifies a stream of nominations, but quality has never been the driving factor in who is recognized by the Academy. Regardless of how it is received in February, when the nominations are announced, Fight Club is a memorable and superior motion picture - a rare movie that does not abandon insight in its quest to jolt the viewer. This marriage of adrenaline and intelligence will make Fight Club a contender for many Best 10 lists at the end of 1999.
    Expand
  5. May 6, 2015
    10
    With its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact, Fight Club refuses to be ignored or dismissed. The experience lingers, demanding to be pondered and considered, and, unlike 95% of modern-dayWith its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact, Fight Club refuses to be ignored or dismissed. The experience lingers, demanding to be pondered and considered, and, unlike 95% of modern-day thrillers, there is a great deal here to think about and argue over. Fight Club presents an overload of thought-provoking material that works on so many levels as to offer grist for the mills of thousands of reviews, feature articles, and post-screening conversations.

    Pre-release interest in Fight Club was understandably high, primarily because of those involved with the project. Jim Uhls' script is based on an influential novel by Chuck Palahniuk (a book that, while not required material in schools, has consumed the free time of countless readers). The lead actor is the ever-popular Brad Pitt, who makes his strongest bid to date to shed his pretty boy image and don the mantle of a serious thespian. Those dubious about Pitt's ability to pull this off in the wake of his recent attempts in Seven Years in Tibet (which is briefly referenced as an in-joke during Fight Club) and Meet Joe Black will suffer a change of heart after seeing this film. Pitt's male co-star, Edward Norton, is widely recognized as one of the most intelligent and versatile performers of his generation. And Fight Club's director, David Fincher, has already made a huge artistic impression on movie-goers with only three features to his credit: Alien 3, Seven (starring Pitt), and The Game. Mix these elements together in Fox's publicity blender, and Fight Club will not carry the title of "Best Movie of 1999 That No One Saw."

    Told in a conventional fashion, Fight Club would still have been engaging. However, Fincher's gritty, restless style turns it into a visual masterpiece. The overall experience is every bit as surreal as watching Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange. This is a tale that unfolds in an eerie alternate universe where the melodies of life have the same rhythm as in ours but are in a different key. Fincher also shows just enough restraint that his flourishes seem like important parts of the storytelling method instead of gimmicks. And there are a lot of them. In one scene, a character's apartment is laid out like a page in a furniture catalog, complete with text blurbs superimposed on the screen describing the various pieces. There are occasional single frame interruptions that flash by so quickly that they may pass unnoticed. The film opens with a truly inventive close-up - one that literally gets under the skin. Also in play: a non-linear chronology, a voiceover by a narrator who might not be entirely reliable, frequent breaking of the fourth wall, and an occasional freeze-frame. As was true of Fincher's other three films, Fight Club is dark and fast-paced. There's not a lot of time for introspection. One could call this MTV style, but, unlike many equally frantic movies, there's a reason for each quick cut beyond preventing viewers from becoming bored.

    Perhaps the most discussed aspect of Fight Club will be its attitude towards and graphic depiction of violence. Even before the film's official premiere, voices have been raised claiming that the movie glorifies violence by portraying it as something positive. This was the complaint leveled against A Clockwork Orange, which, less than three decades after its controversial release, is universally regarded as a classic. There's no denying that Fight Club is a violent movie. Some sequences are so brutal that a portion of the viewing audience will turn away. (The scene that caused me to wince was when one character reached into his mouth and pulled out a loose tooth.) But the purpose of showing all this bloody pummeling is to make a telling point about the bestial nature of man and what can happen when the numbing effects of day-to-day drudgery cause people to go a little crazy. The men who become members of Fight Club are victims of the dehumanizing and desensitizing power of modern-day society. They have become cogs in a wheel. The only way they can regain a sense of individuality is by getting in touch with the primal, barbaric instincts of pain and violence.

    It remains to be seen whether Fight Club will generate any Oscars. The strength of the writing, direction, and acting justifies a stream of nominations, but quality has never been the driving factor in who is recognized by the Academy. Regardless of how it is received in February, when the nominations are announced, Fight Club is a memorable and superior motion picture - a rare movie that does not abandon insight in its quest to jolt the viewer. This marriage of adrenaline and intelligence will make Fight Club a contender for many Best 10 lists at the end of 1999.
    Expand
  6. May 9, 2015
    10
    With its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact, Fight Club refuses to be ignored or dismissed. The experience lingers, demanding to be pondered and considered, and, unlike 95% of modern-dayWith its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact, Fight Club refuses to be ignored or dismissed. The experience lingers, demanding to be pondered and considered, and, unlike 95% of modern-day thrillers, there is a great deal here to think about and argue over. Fight Club presents an overload of thought-provoking material that works on so many levels as to offer grist for the mills of thousands of reviews, feature articles, and post-screening conversations.

    Pre-release interest in Fight Club was understandably high, primarily because of those involved with the project. Jim Uhls' script is based on an influential novel by Chuck Palahniuk (a book that, while not required material in schools, has consumed the free time of countless readers). The lead actor is the ever-popular Brad Pitt, who makes his strongest bid to date to shed his pretty boy image and don the mantle of a serious thespian. Those dubious about Pitt's ability to pull this off in the wake of his recent attempts in Seven Years in Tibet (which is briefly referenced as an in-joke during Fight Club) and Meet Joe Black will suffer a change of heart after seeing this film. Pitt's male co-star, Edward Norton, is widely recognized as one of the most intelligent and versatile performers of his generation. And Fight Club's director, David Fincher, has already made a huge artistic impression on movie-goers with only three features to his credit: Alien 3, Seven (starring Pitt), and The Game. Mix these elements together in Fox's publicity blender, and Fight Club will not carry the title of "Best Movie of 1999 That No One Saw."

    Told in a conventional fashion, Fight Club would still have been engaging. However, Fincher's gritty, restless style turns it into a visual masterpiece. The overall experience is every bit as surreal as watching Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange. This is a tale that unfolds in an eerie alternate universe where the melodies of life have the same rhythm as in ours but are in a different key. Fincher also shows just enough restraint that his flourishes seem like important parts of the storytelling method instead of gimmicks. And there are a lot of them. In one scene, a character's apartment is laid out like a page in a furniture catalog, complete with text blurbs superimposed on the screen describing the various pieces. There are occasional single frame interruptions that flash by so quickly that they may pass unnoticed. The film opens with a truly inventive close-up - one that literally gets under the skin. Also in play: a non-linear chronology, a voiceover by a narrator who might not be entirely reliable, frequent breaking of the fourth wall, and an occasional freeze-frame. As was true of Fincher's other three films, Fight Club is dark and fast-paced. There's not a lot of time for introspection. One could call this MTV style, but, unlike many equally frantic movies, there's a reason for each quick cut beyond preventing viewers from becoming bored.

    In A Clockwork Orange, Kubrick depicted the actions of the Droogs but did not condone it. This is Fincher's approach in Fight Club. As the film progresses, he systematically reveals each new turn in an ever-deepening spiral that descends into darkness and madness. There's also a heavy element of satire and black comedy. Macabre humor can be found everywhere, from the pithy quips traded by Jack and Tyler to the way Jack interacts with his boss. When combined together, the satire, violence, and unpredictable narrative make a lasting and forceful statement about modern-day society. It's a timely message that hints at why there are post office shootings and kids in schools killing their fellow students. By blaming movies like Fight Club for real-life horrors, politicians want us to look at the world through rose-colored glasses that they have tinted. Instead, Fincher offers a clear, uncompromising portrait that disturbs because it is perceptive and defies the facile answers proffered by elected officials. Movies are not to blame. Guns are not to blame. People and the society that has spawned and stifled them are.

    It remains to be seen whether Fight Club will generate any Oscars. The strength of the writing, direction, and acting justifies a stream of nominations, but quality has never been the driving factor in who is recognized by the Academy. Regardless of how it is received in February, when the nominations are announced, Fight Club is a memorable and superior motion picture - a rare movie that does not abandon insight in its quest to jolt the viewer. This marriage of adrenaline and intelligence will make Fight Club a contender for many Best 10 lists at the end of 1999.
    Expand
Metascore
66

Generally favorable reviews - based on 35 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 23 out of 35
  2. Negative: 2 out of 35
  1. 66
    Despite terrific comic acting...and an atomic first hour, Fight Club makes a few wrong turns and ends up lost itself.
  2. This exercise in mainstream masochism, macho posturing, and designer-grunge fascism is borderline ridiculous. But it also happens to be David Fincher's richest movie.
  3. 50
    But the second act is pandering and the third is trickery, and whatever Fincher thinks the message is, that's not what most audience members will get.