Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation | Release Date: October 15, 1999
9.0
USER SCORE
Universal acclaim based on 1512 Ratings
USER RATING DISTRIBUTION
Positive:
1,407
Mixed:
51
Negative:
54
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10
ConorF.Feb 7, 2010
I loved this movie, I think that it delivers its message with a punch and manages to develop the characters without taking anything away from the plot. I think there are two ways people come away from this movie. I think on the one hand you I loved this movie, I think that it delivers its message with a punch and manages to develop the characters without taking anything away from the plot. I think there are two ways people come away from this movie. I think on the one hand you have the people that understand the movie, understand it for what it is, and realize it's brilliance. On the other hand you have the people that look down upon the latter type as infantile for their like of 'senseless violence' and what-not. I think that it is truly these people that do not understand the movie or what it was attempting to bring across to its audience. If you come away from this movie thinking that it was only about the fighting or only about the 'twist' then you have apparently missed the majority of the film. This film seamlessly blends may aspects of cinematography to create one of the most memorable, powerful, insightful, and most of all entertaining films ever made. Expand
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10
ClifCarneiroMar 9, 2009
Perfection is not debatable! One of the best movies of the past decade (90's).
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10
WilliamG.Jan 13, 2010
There is no doubt in my mind that this movie is one of the five best movies ever. The plot, the charecters and the style it is filmed in work cohesivly to create an amazing film. I have yet to see a flaw in it. It is original and has been There is no doubt in my mind that this movie is one of the five best movies ever. The plot, the charecters and the style it is filmed in work cohesivly to create an amazing film. I have yet to see a flaw in it. It is original and has been copied because this fact. Expand
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10
NickHAug 23, 2005
Fight Club is easily in my top ten. I don't number my top ten because they constantly shift in position. I feel a sense of guilt when I rank one classic above another. But, I always know what ten movies are the best that I, personally, Fight Club is easily in my top ten. I don't number my top ten because they constantly shift in position. I feel a sense of guilt when I rank one classic above another. But, I always know what ten movies are the best that I, personally, have seen. Being of a slightly younger generation than this movie was intended for, I don't remember the press surrounding it. Now looking back at all the negative and average reviews, I have to think "What were all those critics on?". A 66 percent? Do you know that the 'Superman: The Movie' has a better score (92%) than this classic piece American cinema! Why is this film not given it's due by the Media? I know why, it's too confusing/violent/abstract for America's less talented, conservative critics. You just have to take this flick for what it is. And that's how you determine what makes movies great. When I became a huge film buff, I was soon told about this movie and shortly there after I rented it - some time ago, I write this just recently having watched it on DVD again - I was wondering how many Oscars it won. It was that great. Zero. Sad, but then again... Oscars don't equal greatness - look at Speilberg. If you haven't seen this movie yet, rent or buy it, and simply take a great movie for what it is. A great movie. Expand
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10
micked13Jan 20, 2006
I've read alot of crtic reviews that don't like this film however the vast majority of movie goers reviews I read are extremly positive. The main problem a lot of people seem to have is that this film is too stylish, and they I've read alot of crtic reviews that don't like this film however the vast majority of movie goers reviews I read are extremly positive. The main problem a lot of people seem to have is that this film is too stylish, and they don't agree with the voilence and content, and the story gets a bit lost. However, I didn't find this with this film and would recommend that people should watch it simply to see if the love it or hate it! Expand
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10
RDalviMar 15, 2006
Excellent performances by Norton and Pitt. Carter is hot. Good theme and razor sharp execution.
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10
EricB.Mar 25, 2006
this an amazing movie, plain and simple. at first glance, it's your simple action movie, but if you watch and analyze it, it goes MUCH deeper than that. Very well filmed, and I myself was surprised to find the main focus of this movies this an amazing movie, plain and simple. at first glance, it's your simple action movie, but if you watch and analyze it, it goes MUCH deeper than that. Very well filmed, and I myself was surprised to find the main focus of this movies was not guys fighting eachother. As was said by Gemma Files of Film.com, " It's also just damn good, on every possible level -- so go see it. Now. " Expand
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10
KrisA.Jun 16, 2006
It is a great thriller and keeps you guessing to the end. Everyone should see this movie atleast once.
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10
RLNov 1, 2007
I really don't understand the scoring system meta has.. but what ever I saw a few 100s for this movie. Good enough. What an original movie.The people who rated in the red are fags I think.
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10
JimB.Mar 25, 2007
One of the greatest movies of all times. Connects with the viewer on a political, moral, romantic, personal, and work ethical level.
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10
terrak.Jul 28, 2007
Great movie.
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10
AlexandraSep 22, 2007
Fight club is the best film I've ever seen, it´s really brilliant it conects a political, moral and a consumerist ikea world in one film. Everone does watch it to love this movie.
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10
BarryP.Oct 18, 2008
Such awesome acting from all of the main cast. It's the best thriller out there.
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10
WesleyT.Jun 28, 2008
Fight Club is easily one of the greatest American films since The Godfather.
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10
AlbertoAAug 10, 2009
Perhaps the greatest film of our generation, without a doubt Fincher's best work, and Pitt's legacy.
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10
AntonioS.Feb 22, 2010
One of the best movies I've ever seen - brilliant acting, directing, and writing.
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10
JacobF.Feb 9, 2010
Fight Club is such a great film and one of my favorite movies of all time. The story is great and so is the acting. The ending will blow your mind. If you haven't seen this movie you need to watch it whenever you get the chance.
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10
SeamusJun 14, 2010
One of the best movies ever made.
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10
JustinSJan 13, 2008
One of the greatest guy movies ever. Anyone who doesn't like this movie probably listens to Kenny G music. And by definition should be legally and morally stripped of any human rights.
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10
KatieV.Jan 30, 2008
This movie possibly suffers for its title. Fight Club is one of the most cynical and bitter expressions of the world. Yet, in a completly dark and disturbing way, it's beautiful.
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10
Casey?BrMay 13, 2008
Frist Anacho-Fascist is the wrong word. The movie is Nihilistic. Tyler Durden is the archtype of Nihilistic theroy. All Palanhiuk novels have at least one Nihilist character. The word you people are using is way wrong. Also the movie is Frist Anacho-Fascist is the wrong word. The movie is Nihilistic. Tyler Durden is the archtype of Nihilistic theroy. All Palanhiuk novels have at least one Nihilist character. The word you people are using is way wrong. Also the movie is often word for word from the greatest novel of the 1990s, including nearly all of the joke lines so insluting them is a slap in mulitple faces. The Flim is shot beautifully and acted very well so even if the consepts make you feel uncomfortible there is no excuse to give it lower than a 6 purely on those grounds. People that enjoyed this movie should read the book, it reads very fast and with seeing the movie first it will feel as though Edward Norton is talking in your head; that can't possibly be a bad thing. Expand
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10
MHJun 16, 2008
A movie which explores the human psyche and travels into the uncharted territories of the mind, bringing (almost) everything into question but allowing the audience to pass judgement.
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10
JohnE.Aug 28, 2008
One of the best movies of all time.
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10
MattD.Sep 25, 2008
This movie is deep and awesome. Anyone who complains that it's "not funny" (like some of the reviews actually do) does not know what he/she is talking about. Ever line is meticulously chosen and it gets better the more times you watch This movie is deep and awesome. Anyone who complains that it's "not funny" (like some of the reviews actually do) does not know what he/she is talking about. Ever line is meticulously chosen and it gets better the more times you watch it. Fight Club's my favorite movie. Expand
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10
LukeD.Oct 27, 2009
Amazing, Fight Club is just one big intense ride that will take you to places that will blow your mind and dustrub you from start to finish.
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10
NormR.Feb 18, 2009
A perfect quirky movie. Great twists and great plot. And funny. But for me, the underlying message is the problem of the modern male whose masculinity is constantly under siege which in one scene or more scenes this takes a liiteral bent.
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10
LukeCMar 29, 2009
Could not have been done any better. One of the few movies that you will never get tired of watching. Classic.
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10
elizabethr.Nov 8, 2005
I adore this movie. it is so honest and so in-your-face that it is impossible to ignore. pitt as tyler and norton as the narrator are amazing. ive had the movie memorized since the first time i saw it and ive written many papers on it for my I adore this movie. it is so honest and so in-your-face that it is impossible to ignore. pitt as tyler and norton as the narrator are amazing. ive had the movie memorized since the first time i saw it and ive written many papers on it for my media studies major. the psychoanalytic qualities in this movie are all over the place. long comment short... if you dont like this movie then there is something seriously and terribly wrong with you. Expand
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10
TerranceP.Dec 27, 2005
One of the most intriguiging and mind blowing cinematic experiences that does not dim everytime you watch it. Fight Club is one of the rarities in today's filming industry that deserves a 10.
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10
JasonA.Feb 15, 2006
I've watched this movie more than any other movie and it never gets old. The number of quoteable lines in this film is remarkable. I once sat down with a pen and a notebook and wrote every line I found interesting, witty, ect... I I've watched this movie more than any other movie and it never gets old. The number of quoteable lines in this film is remarkable. I once sat down with a pen and a notebook and wrote every line I found interesting, witty, ect... I filled 5 pgs front and back. If you enjoyed the movie then all I can say is READ THE BOOK! Chuck Palahniuk's novel puts this amazing movie to shame. Expand
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10
JohnE.Apr 18, 2006
One of the best movies of all time.
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10
SteveH.Apr 19, 2006
This is easily one of the greatest movies of all time. It grabs you by the shirt and has your attention the whole movie. The plot is so unbelievable that your head will be spinning until the final twist. After I saw this movie I This is easily one of the greatest movies of all time. It grabs you by the shirt and has your attention the whole movie. The plot is so unbelievable that your head will be spinning until the final twist. After I saw this movie I couldn't help compare it to every other movie I ever saw. Trust me after you see fight club it will totally raises your standards of what a movie must have in order for you to enjoy it. It truly is astronomical how well thought out this entire film was. Expand
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9
MarkR.Jan 13, 2007
If I were a film maker, this is the kind of movie I'll be trying to do. Excellent.
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10
AlexF.Dec 14, 2007
An exquisitely crafted thrill ride with heavy philosophical tones.
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10
terrak.Dec 5, 2007
Great movie.
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10
GiselleZOct 27, 2007
The movie was so good! I had never read the book, so the ending was a shock to me! I will definitely buy the movie and the book!
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10
TylerDurdenOct 31, 2007
This film defines the generation gap between Baby Boomers and Generation X more than any other film. Virtually every Baby Boomer I know who has even seen this film hates it, and every Gen Xer I know thinks it is one of the greatest films of This film defines the generation gap between Baby Boomers and Generation X more than any other film. Virtually every Baby Boomer I know who has even seen this film hates it, and every Gen Xer I know thinks it is one of the greatest films of all time. Baby Boomers lost their determination to change the world for the better and to lead more rewarding, fulfilling lives by giving up materialistic desires. They became the Me generation who bought into all the crap that Madison Avenue had to sell them. Hopefully Gen X does not follow this path, but unfortunately I think the slide from youthful idealism into elder complacence is probably a universal thing that affects every generation eventually. What a true gift it would be to be able to shake off the artificial needs instilled in us by a consumer society and be happy to just exist in the world. Expand
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8
BlakeJ.Mar 11, 2007
What can I say that hasn't already been said by other people my age? I don't know how the average, simple minded, teenagers realized that this is a good film...I'm guessing it's just one of those movies that are "hip" to What can I say that hasn't already been said by other people my age? I don't know how the average, simple minded, teenagers realized that this is a good film...I'm guessing it's just one of those movies that are "hip" to like. I liked Helena Bonham Carter a lot, if that matters. Expand
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10
chadsJul 14, 2007
How can the Los Angeles Times and Entertainment Weekly be so horribly wrong in their judgment about this movie. I will admit that i disliked Fight Club after watching it the first time, but i could at least appreciate it for its criticism on How can the Los Angeles Times and Entertainment Weekly be so horribly wrong in their judgment about this movie. I will admit that i disliked Fight Club after watching it the first time, but i could at least appreciate it for its criticism on the life of a gray collar worker. However, the second time i watched the movie i was able to pay close attention and really noticed how great of a movie it truly is. This is a must own, and must see for everyone. This is your life and its ending one minute at a time. Watch Fight Club before it ends. Expand
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10
BloodRusherDec 22, 2008
Its not a good movie, its not one of the best, its a f*cking perfect movie!
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8
BenBJan 27, 2008
A very intelligent, thought-provoking movie that I really enjoyed. The performances were top notch, and the premise extremely original. That being said, the movie somehow failed to grab me: very good, epic, but not exceptional. I expected A very intelligent, thought-provoking movie that I really enjoyed. The performances were top notch, and the premise extremely original. That being said, the movie somehow failed to grab me: very good, epic, but not exceptional. I expected slightly better, but it's certainly worth a rent. Also, the final twist was a little too foreshadowed: when you guess it (as I did fairly early on), the movie loses some of its drive. Expand
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8
amethystsSep 23, 2009
A brilliant movie... that is what it is. every aspect of the movie is dealt with utmost precision. the mental dilemma of each of the characters is clearly defined. it is a movie with a prescription to see once more. still wondering why the A brilliant movie... that is what it is. every aspect of the movie is dealt with utmost precision. the mental dilemma of each of the characters is clearly defined. it is a movie with a prescription to see once more. still wondering why the movie is not favorably rated. Expand
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10
StevenV.Sep 23, 2009
Fight Club is an astonishingly original idea. Im glad the movie did the book justice. Its obviously one of those movies where if you don't get it, you don't get it. I've heard too many people asking why they fought each other. Fight Club is an astonishingly original idea. Im glad the movie did the book justice. Its obviously one of those movies where if you don't get it, you don't get it. I've heard too many people asking why they fought each other. Those people obviously missed the point. These people probably prefer lighter fair like Bio Dome. Expand
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9
marshallmNov 26, 2005
Pretty funny, and bizarre. fincher is a great director. grade: ( 9.5 )
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8
JakeDec 14, 2005
I loved the beginning, and Brad Pitt is hil-fecking-arious, bu the bit with project mayhem, although pretty entertaining, just seemed to be missing something. Also, all the over the top psuedo-philosophies of Pitt's character seemed I loved the beginning, and Brad Pitt is hil-fecking-arious, bu the bit with project mayhem, although pretty entertaining, just seemed to be missing something. Also, all the over the top psuedo-philosophies of Pitt's character seemed pretty heavy-handed and illogical, although that's essentially how they were in the book. Expand
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10
DanDec 21, 2008
One of the best movies I have ever seen. It's not about the fighting as much as you might think, although there is a good deal of it. Great acting, I absolutely loved Ed Norton, and Pitt is a good compliment to him.
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9
JanetCDec 22, 2008
Great film! Don't understand the haters...if it didn't live up to the book, then fine. But if you have some other reason, I do not see it.
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10
JordanH.Nov 16, 2009
This movie was about far more than fighting and causing chaos. it was also about how people can't live up to their own standards and how is this not a deep film? i guess if you are a stoner all you would think was hey cool fighting but This movie was about far more than fighting and causing chaos. it was also about how people can't live up to their own standards and how is this not a deep film? i guess if you are a stoner all you would think was hey cool fighting but if you have half a brain youll look into the deeper meaning. Expand
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10
roddersj04Jan 1, 2011
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. I'm about to break the first and second rules of Fight Club, because I have to talk about this amazing film. At first glance, this may seem like a simple testostorone based film that takes place within an actual fight club. Look further, for this is so much more. It is a satire on modern life, using things like schizophrenia & terrorism to illustrate this. Edward Nortons nameless narrator character meets two people who change his life: Tyler Durden (played by Brad Pitt) and Marla Singer (Helena Bonham Carter) With Tyler, the narrator creates a fight club, in which people who are stressed out and pissed off come to unload steam by beating the crap out of each other. It does make sense, by unloading your stress onto another person, concentrating it into every blow, you feel better about your day. The fight club then turns into something else entirely, an anarchic group whom commit acts of vandalism with cheer and smiles on their faces. Tylers actions may be anarchic, but they make sense. He believes everything has become so complicated with us wanting things we do not need, so sets out to destroy these things, like Starbucks. Each of the actors play their role convincingly. Edward Nortons insomniac narrator is a brilliant creation, along with the bat **** insane Tyler Durden. I gotta talk about the twist, that Tyler is actually another personality of the narrator. Once you know about this twist, watch the film a second time. You will see it make sense, and see the twist being sown earlier on into the story little by little. It is gritty also. For an example, see Edward Norton beating into Jared Letos face. Its so bloody. And when you see Tyler throwing Edward down the stairs, you know its actually Edward Norton throwing himself down the stairs, and thats a little creepy. The humour as well, Tylers earlier jobs, cutting porn into kids films and pissing in soup, is hilarious. Also, fight club members trying to start fights. They even cut a porn shot into the end of the film How can you not love this film? The acting, the writing, the direction, the twist, the storyline, its all brilliant. Quite bloody, but psychologically awesome. If you haven't seen it, you must! Expand
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10
zombiehampsterMar 19, 2015
Fight Club is multi-faceted movie about a man who is deeply unsatisfied with his life in the modern age, even with all the trappings of success that much of our society is based on, and decides to go off the beaten path to find his ownFight Club is multi-faceted movie about a man who is deeply unsatisfied with his life in the modern age, even with all the trappings of success that much of our society is based on, and decides to go off the beaten path to find his own personal satisfaction. From that point on the movie spirals out of control and into the abyss. This is a good thing.

The movie holds many meanings and shows the characters in favorable and unfavorable ways. It does not try to cast things in a typical good and evil view point, nor does it say whether the choices the protagonist and the rest of the cast make are sound ones. One of the things it does do is look into the nature of our past, viewing the structure of our society and analyzing why we do what we do to live. It isn't until the narrator (Edward Norton) begins to destroy himself that he finally comes to realize what matters to him. That is when he meets two important characters, Marla Singer and Tyler Durden. It is during this time that the narrator escapes from his normal life by hosting with Tyler an underground fight club that evolved from the two just fighting outside of a local bar.

Taking in Tyler's view on life, which is somewhat refreshing and scary at the same time, they form a close bond strongly resembling a married couple. The two do everything together and the narrator begins to emulate Tyler more and more, all the while the fight club grows stronger and stronger until it has become this cult-like phenomenon with Tyler and the narrator as leaders making rules for conducting fight club.

Anarchy and non-conformity is their message, which I believe is meant to underscore the irony of fight club and their non-conformist, fight the man attitude. As the group evolves into something more dangerous, this irony becomes more apparent in the way those who once questioned the established authority, now blindly follow their "non-conformist" new group.

Its been a little over a decade since Fight Club "enlightened" me, but it still gives me the same conflicting feelings about its message and the nature of humanity in general. There are those who would take it at its face value and see nothing but frustrated, grown men beating each other senselessly, and that's a shame because there is definitely much more going on then that. David Fincher has crafted an excellent movie: it's disgustingly stylish in its execution...almost too much, if that's possible. The sound track, done by the Dust Brothers burrowed it's way into my brain and never left. The movie would not be the same without it.

As far as the actors performances, Ed Norton and Brad Pitt both have a strong rapport and the scenes come off naturally, while Helena Bonham Carter's Marla is hauntingly tragic, and filled with a desperate, but subtle sadness to her.

At the time of the original screening this movie polarized people into the two camps of love or hate, due to it's ability to offended or amaze, but I wouldn't have it any other way. Too often are movies eager to please. This one strives to offend and cause questions...and I love it for that.
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10
tim99999Jan 1, 2011
Ed Norton and Brad Pitt bring the amazing novel to life in what I personally consider one of the greatest movies ever made. The directing, acting, and visual appearance of this film is spectacular.
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9
JonnyFendiJan 10, 2011
Tyler Durden, I expect will be one of the most memorable character in cult-classic movies. Fight Club directed by David Fincher who always made a gloomy and mysterious effect on his every movie. The most important roles in thiz movie held byTyler Durden, I expect will be one of the most memorable character in cult-classic movies. Fight Club directed by David Fincher who always made a gloomy and mysterious effect on his every movie. The most important roles in thiz movie held by Edward Norton and Brad Pitt. Norton played the main character, which the name was not mentioned until the end of films. Pitt played as Tyler Durden, the bad boy character. The other Casts are Helena Bonham Carter and Meatloaf, as we knew him as musician. The Plots was arranged well. We could see what really happen from the beginning till the end from the innocent eye of the narrator. The movie begins with a slow intro. In the early of the story, he was told as insomniac. But after a few incidents, he found himself liked to have some imaginary visions, in that time Tyler Durden was appeared. Afterwards, Durden character collaborates with Norton character roller-coasting all over the rest of film. The story is getting excited dramatically. Brad Pitt played as wild profound character. One of his quotes was so powerful, The No.1 rule about fight club, is do not talk about fight club,.. The No.2 rule about fight club isâ Expand
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10
Schmit93Jan 11, 2011
this is one of the few movies I can watch over and over again and still be in awe. I love this movie, very brutal yet entertaining. I read that he author of the book, (Chuck Palahniuk) has said he likes this version better than his book Fightthis is one of the few movies I can watch over and over again and still be in awe. I love this movie, very brutal yet entertaining. I read that he author of the book, (Chuck Palahniuk) has said he likes this version better than his book Fight Club from which the movie is based, if that's not a good enough review for you then I don't know what is. Expand
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7
codfather96May 1, 2011
The way this movie plays out makes you start to either feel that life should be lived how you want it to or just makes you feel like all of humanity should just give up because certain people need to fight to feel loved. The movie starts wellThe way this movie plays out makes you start to either feel that life should be lived how you want it to or just makes you feel like all of humanity should just give up because certain people need to fight to feel loved. The movie starts well but in the last 2 minutes it just lets its self down. Expand
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10
AkadrudFeb 13, 2014
I had to write about this movie. It's just a masterpiece. Anyone shouting about violence or fights or bad language, which are only a tiny part of it, are just people who can't understand the movie and its cleverness, its message, its point ofI had to write about this movie. It's just a masterpiece. Anyone shouting about violence or fights or bad language, which are only a tiny part of it, are just people who can't understand the movie and its cleverness, its message, its point of view on life, the wonderful acting, photography, music. Yes, actually you must have some intellect to understand what's behind the surface and the great effort David Fincher put in it. Expand
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10
zcohen17Mar 23, 2011
One of the best movies in history. It goes deep into the animal side of the male psyche while providing twists and turns. With realistic fight scenes, memorable quotes and hilarious content, Fight Club is a true treasure.
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9
JordanPApr 16, 2011
The negative reviews seem concerned that the message of this film is not important or original enough. That seems to bypass the major achievement of this film, which is that it is able to wax philosophical about our dehumanisation while beingThe negative reviews seem concerned that the message of this film is not important or original enough. That seems to bypass the major achievement of this film, which is that it is able to wax philosophical about our dehumanisation while being bloody entertaining from start to finish.

It is certainly uncomfortable viewing at times. More worrying is that it flirts throughout with silly machismo and a hackneyed twist at the end, but if nothing else, it at least can justify both of those directions. It remains a clever and thought-provoking exploration of its theme -- regardless of how many people have thought of asking similar questions before.
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10
Dorian182Apr 28, 2011
This has to be one of the greatest films of all time. Flawlessy executed and with a deep meaning, Fight Club rightly deserves it's status as a cult classic.
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9
kman5473Jul 10, 2017
The biggest flaw of this film is its failure to explicitly denounce its own insanity. There is so much to be said about its thematic layering, and how it perfectly wraps a story around it's central theme--that hyper masculinity is completelyThe biggest flaw of this film is its failure to explicitly denounce its own insanity. There is so much to be said about its thematic layering, and how it perfectly wraps a story around it's central theme--that hyper masculinity is completely dangerous--but it still romanticizes that violence of that masculinity. There aren't really any consequences faced by the main character; he is strong enough to realize his own insanity, confront it, and destroy it, but all too late. Too many people miss the point, and end up starting their own Fight Club (which is exactly what this is against doing). Expand
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10
OriolousSep 25, 2011
Como ya se ha dicho, película de culto y efectista hasta la médula. Gran film que te atrapa des del principio hasta su inesperado y espectacular final.
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7
oxanaJan 3, 2015
Interesting movie. It's been a while since I saw this, but I still remember I loved the way the entire plot was built up. If you don't like a bit of mindless violence, don't watch, but others... oh yes :)
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8
Dimitris01Oct 17, 2013
It is original and unpredictable and has good performances but its ideas are horrible: strong minorities should impose their will upon society and freedom is connected with violence and primal instincts. argonautis.eu
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9
marcmyworksJun 17, 2016
A stellar and amazing film from David Fincher. Over the years this film has managed to stay relevant and powerful. Brad Pitt and Edward Norton's chemistry is some of the strongest I have seen.
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9
El_JackoMay 9, 2015
What can be said about Fight Club that hasn't already been said. With superb performances from Norton and Pitt, excellent direction from Fincher, a darkly comic script and THAT twist ending, Fight Club truly deserves the cult classic statusWhat can be said about Fight Club that hasn't already been said. With superb performances from Norton and Pitt, excellent direction from Fincher, a darkly comic script and THAT twist ending, Fight Club truly deserves the cult classic status it has attained. Expand
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9
Potarto72Dec 21, 2014
Fight Club is a truly great film in several aspects. Not only is David Fincher's direction spot-on, with every nuance working just the way it should to get the message across, but Brad Pitt and Ed Norton both give excellent performances asFight Club is a truly great film in several aspects. Not only is David Fincher's direction spot-on, with every nuance working just the way it should to get the message across, but Brad Pitt and Ed Norton both give excellent performances as the film's protagonists.
The story and visual style tap into the human mind on certain primal levels. Not only does the film itself release aggression, but it helps viewers do the same. Everything works just right to get a brilliant message across, resulting in a very entertaining and very well made film.
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10
ozymandias79Nov 6, 2016
Interesting that's there's such disparity between critics and the rest of the world. Fight club is an awesome movie. It's in at least the top three of most guy's all time favorite movies list . It's not about fighting. Fight club is a complexInteresting that's there's such disparity between critics and the rest of the world. Fight club is an awesome movie. It's in at least the top three of most guy's all time favorite movies list . It's not about fighting. Fight club is a complex film that uses much of the source material very successfully. Expand
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7
diogomendesAug 18, 2015
My 200th Movie Review!

I really liked this film. A lot of the actors give their performances as grounded as you could get in a movie experience. David Fincher's direction is spectacular and the script is clever, and adds some delightfully
My 200th Movie Review!

I really liked this film. A lot of the actors give their performances as grounded as you could get in a movie experience. David Fincher's direction is spectacular and the script is clever, and adds some delightfully dark comedy. This one of the strangest movies I've ever seen, and I say this in the best way possible. Yeah, some moments were a little over-the-top but that didn't ruin the movie.

Overall, pretty good movie with good acting performances and a darkly comic story.

7.5/10.
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10
fijiboyJan 15, 2015
if you call yourself a film lover you must watch this movie. possibly David Fincher's best work (which is saying a lot) fight club is not simply just about men beating each other up, it is a much deeper and thought provoking movie than youif you call yourself a film lover you must watch this movie. possibly David Fincher's best work (which is saying a lot) fight club is not simply just about men beating each other up, it is a much deeper and thought provoking movie than you would ever expect and to explain any more would spoil the movie. best way to watch it is knowing nothing going in. understand that this movie is extremely over the top and should not be taken to seriously. knowing that, there is no reason why someone would dislike this movie, unless you don't enjoy violent movies because it is definitely violent. this movie is great, one of the most classic of classic movies Expand
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8
Tomle1202Jul 24, 2015
Beautiful and thought-provoking, Fight Club is one of those rare movies where the watchers have to rethink about themselves, their lives and the world itself.
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10
KaprawiecMay 29, 2015
66 Metascore based od 35 critics? Really? One of the critic said that this is not funny and the joke is on us? This only shows us, who critics really are. Frustrated bunch of loosers. This is true classic, and one of my favourite movies of66 Metascore based od 35 critics? Really? One of the critic said that this is not funny and the joke is on us? This only shows us, who critics really are. Frustrated bunch of loosers. This is true classic, and one of my favourite movies of all time. A must see. You wont find anything like this - of course there is a chance You wont like it but You cant deny that this is something special. Expand
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10
IamEVILJan 22, 2016
One of my favorite movies to date, Ed Norton and Brad Pitt acting are completely insane, literally, the writing is perfect, with amazing dialogues, and of course the incredible directing of David Fincher. And the sucker punch in the end justOne of my favorite movies to date, Ed Norton and Brad Pitt acting are completely insane, literally, the writing is perfect, with amazing dialogues, and of course the incredible directing of David Fincher. And the sucker punch in the end just makes this movie even better. A perfect story for all of us to enjoy and be amazed by. Expand
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10
Luke_RiosNov 15, 2014
Fight Club delivers on every front possible. All those upset at the lack of resolution in a David Fincher film must be the same people that caused all peanut butter containers in North America to say: "Warning contains peanut". There is noFight Club delivers on every front possible. All those upset at the lack of resolution in a David Fincher film must be the same people that caused all peanut butter containers in North America to say: "Warning contains peanut". There is no genre to judge this film on because it created its own, it is a dark satire not a drama or comedy, but sort of a mix of the two in an amazing way. Expand
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9
REDWOUNov 22, 2014
Fight Club was a very good movie. David Fincher's best movie, since I haven't rated any other of his movies higher by decimal number or a ten. Brad Pitt's second best performance, following 12 Monkeys. Edward Norton's best performance.
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10
CorrectreviewsDec 4, 2014
Fight club is a unique and brilliant movie depicting inner struggles and the dangers of both materialism and radicalism. full of great quotes and thought provoking story lines. Its Highly detailed story is amazing not to mention a perfectlyFight club is a unique and brilliant movie depicting inner struggles and the dangers of both materialism and radicalism. full of great quotes and thought provoking story lines. Its Highly detailed story is amazing not to mention a perfectly executed plot twist that makes you want to watch the movie again for all the brilliant hints. Fight club is a classic and should be seen buy all movie lovers Expand
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10
SmileATTJan 24, 2015
David Fincher is very good and clever director he make interesting movies with good story line and really mess up ending.Fight Club is movie which point is to show us what we want to see most of the people go to cinema to see violence and sexDavid Fincher is very good and clever director he make interesting movies with good story line and really mess up ending.Fight Club is movie which point is to show us what we want to see most of the people go to cinema to see violence and sex in the movies because that's what they need in there life more violence and more sex and this movie give them exactly that . The movie show us a how Norrtons character who have a boring life and he is scared of making decisions to change it. And he finally find what he need an alternative ego (Brad Pitt) a guy who do whatever he wants and it's not afraid of making decisions and who push Norrton to do exactly the same thing take a control of his own life and fixed . Expand
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9
itchipodJun 28, 2016
Great Movie! I learned a lot about being an adult, working inside a company and having friends. Every man should watch this movie. The pacing is great and the story is relatable and funny.
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10
VinceRocks123Apr 17, 2015
a picture perfect satire of rebellion in the low levels of american society, this film's cult status has indeed glorified everyone's expectations in the years that followed. superb directed, some cool acting, and a mind-blowing script its thea picture perfect satire of rebellion in the low levels of american society, this film's cult status has indeed glorified everyone's expectations in the years that followed. superb directed, some cool acting, and a mind-blowing script its the number one coming of age American new wave that mixes and twists up everything a young viewer wants to see and make it into something cool, and tends to hit back at Chuck Palaniuk's version of a society littered with high ranking lifestyles ,community advertisements, and unpleasant businesses with a very pissed off underworld ready to rise up from the filth and fight back against the life that oppresses them.

A underrated classical mosaic, that mashes up Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange with Hitchcock's Strangers on A Train that will make you cringe with more graphic violence you haven't seen in any other film or adult rated comic

This Is Your Life and its Ending One Minute at A Time....... Unless If Theres Another Option
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10
EdwardGregoryApr 19, 2015
Suffering a boiling wave of utterly predictable tabloid controversy, This Monstrous Movie (® Daily Mail) seems to be 1999's Crash/NBK/Reservoir Dogs, a film so devastatingly toxic that its very existence is not only responsible for everySuffering a boiling wave of utterly predictable tabloid controversy, This Monstrous Movie (® Daily Mail) seems to be 1999's Crash/NBK/Reservoir Dogs, a film so devastatingly toxic that its very existence is not only responsible for every post-kebab scuffle, but the soaring divorce rate, teenage alcoholism and the terminal inadequacy of frozen pizza.

In fact, though definitely not one for the kiddiewinks, Fincher's film is a molasses-black comedy shot through with his blistering, hyper-kinetic style, a score that punches you in the chest, and standout performances from Pitt and Norton. And sadly, it's afflicted with one flaw that just ejects it from the masterpiece category.

Our narrator, 'Jack' (Norton), is a directionless everybloke who, when not weathering humiliating chewings-out at work, exists as an inadequate nighthawk, trying to cure his chronic insomnia by fixing on the synthetic sympathy of assorted nocturnal self-help groups. Solace is finally found with his head enveloped in a sobbing Meatloaf's pendulous **** **** while attending a support group for men with testicular cancer (told you this was black). The symbolism couldn't be clearer - if Jack isn't actually ball-less, he might as well be.

Something obviously has to give, and it does when Jack meets Tyler Durden (Pitt) on the plane home from a business trip. He arrives back at his apartment to find it in ruins - having mysteriously exploded in a fiery Armageddon of Ikea - so he calls Tyler, who invites him to crash round his place. And then invites him to punch him in the kisser. Which he does, and soon they're scrapping like squaddies in the car park, and enjoying it - the simple act of mano-a-mano rucking reminding Jack not only that he's alive, but that he's a he.

The craze spreads, and fight clubs start springing up all over the country with Tyler as their charismatic leader. But Tyler has a hidden agenda, and before Jack knows it, he's extending his organisation's activities into surreal random acts of anti-capitalist terrorism - the highly secret Project Mayhem. Starbucks coffee houses are razed. Corporate art is demolished. And rich, vain women have their own liposuctioned lard sold back to them as classy soap.

There are so many ways to read Fight Club that it's almost impossible to know where to start. Is it a fascistic call to action for a generation of dickless wonders? A homoerotic love story in which Jack is reintroduced to his nads before being carried off in Tyler's pneumatic arms? A satire on modern feminism's cartoonish views of what men are like, or...? Well, have a go yourself. It's half the fun.

The other half is Fincher's scorching style. From an opening title sequence that out-Sevens Seven's, he presents a maelstrom of celluloid sorcery. Flash cuts, subliminal images, fake cue dots, jumping film... it's a howling monster of a movie that virtually sticks its ravening snout out of the screen and bites you.

Norton is as fine as ever, but Pitt is the standout, lending Tyler a beguiling sense of glamour and danger, while the fights themselves - vicious brawls accompanied by the sound of cracking bones - herald the movie's most subversive image: men's blood-drenched, caved-in heads sporting huge, almost post-coital, smiles.

But then it starts to go awry. From the moment Project Mayhem is instituted, some of the sly blackness leaks out, and after a slew of implausibilities in the last half hour - including a twist out of the bottom of a cornflakes packet - it degenerates into an entertaining but vacuous comedy. Finally, having lost the courage of its gleefully nasty convictions, it concludes with a tiny burp of a bad gag. In the end, Fincher's brilliant film is, ironically, short in the cojones department - and if he wants to argue about it, we'd be happy to. Outside.
Fight Club is one movie that exactly caught the pre-millennial tension. Great performances, stunning visuals and a plot like nothing you've ever seen - One of the best films Ever!
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10
EddyGregsApr 19, 2015
Insurance drone Jack (Norton) can't sleep, and haunts self-help groups for fatal illnesses until he encounters Tyler Durden (Pitt), a charismatic anarchist who invites him to move into his decrepit house after his condo is blown up. Jack andInsurance drone Jack (Norton) can't sleep, and haunts self-help groups for fatal illnesses until he encounters Tyler Durden (Pitt), a charismatic anarchist who invites him to move into his decrepit house after his condo is blown up. Jack and Tyler have recreational fist-fights, which expand into an underground masculinist movement. However, cracks appear in the relationship as Tyler cops off with a Goth bizarro (Bonham Carter) and his pranks go from subversive to near-homicidal.

There are so many ways to read Fight Club that it's almost impossible to know where to start. Is it a fascistic call to action for a generation of dickless wonders? A homoerotic love story in which Jack is reintroduced to his nads before being carried off in Tyler's pneumatic arms? A satire on modern feminism's cartoonish views of what men are like, or...? Well, have a go yourself. It's half the fun.

Fight Club is one movie that exactly caught the pre-millennial tension. Great performances, stunning visuals and a plot like nothing you've ever seen - one of the best films ever!
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10
MovieManiac83Apr 23, 2015
With its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact,With its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact, Fight Club refuses to be ignored or dismissed. The experience lingers, demanding to be pondered and considered, and, unlike 95% of modern-day thrillers, there is a great deal here to think about and argue over. Fight Club presents an overload of thought-provoking material that works on so many levels as to offer grist for the mills of thousands of reviews, feature articles, and post-screening conversations.

Pre-release interest in Fight Club was understandably high, primarily because of those involved with the project. Jim Uhls' script is based on an influential novel by Chuck Palahniuk (a book that, while not required material in schools, has consumed the free time of countless readers). The lead actor is the ever-popular Brad Pitt, who makes his strongest bid to date to shed his pretty boy image and don the mantle of a serious thespian. Those dubious about Pitt's ability to pull this off in the wake of his recent attempts in Seven Years in Tibet (which is briefly referenced as an in-joke during Fight Club) and Meet Joe Black will suffer a change of heart after seeing this film. Pitt's male co-star, Edward Norton, is widely recognized as one of the most intelligent and versatile performers of his generation. And Fight Club's director, David Fincher, has already made a huge artistic impression on movie-goers with only three features to his credit: Alien 3, Seven (starring Pitt), and The Game. Mix these elements together in Fox's publicity blender, and Fight Club will not carry the title of "Best Movie of 1999 That No One Saw."

Told in a conventional fashion, Fight Club would still have been engaging. However, Fincher's gritty, restless style turns it into a visual masterpiece. The overall experience is every bit as surreal as watching Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange. This is a tale that unfolds in an eerie alternate universe where the melodies of life have the same rhythm as in ours but are in a different key. Fincher also shows just enough restraint that his flourishes seem like important parts of the storytelling method instead of gimmicks. And there are a lot of them. In one scene, a character's apartment is laid out like a page in a furniture catalog, complete with text blurbs superimposed on the screen describing the various pieces. There are occasional single frame interruptions that flash by so quickly that they may pass unnoticed. The film opens with a truly inventive close-up - one that literally gets under the skin. Also in play: a non-linear chronology, a voiceover by a narrator who might not be entirely reliable, frequent breaking of the fourth wall, and an occasional freeze-frame. As was true of Fincher's other three films, Fight Club is dark and fast-paced. There's not a lot of time for introspection. One could call this MTV style, but, unlike many equally frantic movies, there's a reason for each quick cut beyond preventing viewers from becoming bored.

Perhaps the most discussed aspect of Fight Club will be its attitude towards and graphic depiction of violence. Even before the film's official premiere, voices have been raised claiming that the movie glorifies violence by portraying it as something positive. This was the complaint leveled against A Clockwork Orange, which, less than three decades after its controversial release, is universally regarded as a classic. There's no denying that Fight Club is a violent movie. Some sequences are so brutal that a portion of the viewing audience will turn away. (The scene that caused me to wince was when one character reached into his mouth and pulled out a loose tooth.) But the purpose of showing all this bloody pummeling is to make a telling point about the bestial nature of man and what can happen when the numbing effects of day-to-day drudgery cause people to go a little crazy. The men who become members of Fight Club are victims of the dehumanizing and desensitizing power of modern-day society. They have become cogs in a wheel. The only way they can regain a sense of individuality is by getting in touch with the primal, barbaric instincts of pain and violence.

It remains to be seen whether Fight Club will generate any Oscars. The strength of the writing, direction, and acting justifies a stream of nominations, but quality has never been the driving factor in who is recognized by the Academy. Regardless of how it is received in February, when the nominations are announced, Fight Club is a memorable and superior motion picture - a rare movie that does not abandon insight in its quest to jolt the viewer. This marriage of adrenaline and intelligence will make Fight Club a contender for many Best 10 lists at the end of 1999.
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10
CinemaBlendMay 6, 2015
With its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact,With its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact, Fight Club refuses to be ignored or dismissed. The experience lingers, demanding to be pondered and considered, and, unlike 95% of modern-day thrillers, there is a great deal here to think about and argue over. Fight Club presents an overload of thought-provoking material that works on so many levels as to offer grist for the mills of thousands of reviews, feature articles, and post-screening conversations.

Pre-release interest in Fight Club was understandably high, primarily because of those involved with the project. Jim Uhls' script is based on an influential novel by Chuck Palahniuk (a book that, while not required material in schools, has consumed the free time of countless readers). The lead actor is the ever-popular Brad Pitt, who makes his strongest bid to date to shed his pretty boy image and don the mantle of a serious thespian. Those dubious about Pitt's ability to pull this off in the wake of his recent attempts in Seven Years in Tibet (which is briefly referenced as an in-joke during Fight Club) and Meet Joe Black will suffer a change of heart after seeing this film. Pitt's male co-star, Edward Norton, is widely recognized as one of the most intelligent and versatile performers of his generation. And Fight Club's director, David Fincher, has already made a huge artistic impression on movie-goers with only three features to his credit: Alien 3, Seven (starring Pitt), and The Game. Mix these elements together in Fox's publicity blender, and Fight Club will not carry the title of "Best Movie of 1999 That No One Saw."

Told in a conventional fashion, Fight Club would still have been engaging. However, Fincher's gritty, restless style turns it into a visual masterpiece. The overall experience is every bit as surreal as watching Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange. This is a tale that unfolds in an eerie alternate universe where the melodies of life have the same rhythm as in ours but are in a different key. Fincher also shows just enough restraint that his flourishes seem like important parts of the storytelling method instead of gimmicks. And there are a lot of them. In one scene, a character's apartment is laid out like a page in a furniture catalog, complete with text blurbs superimposed on the screen describing the various pieces. There are occasional single frame interruptions that flash by so quickly that they may pass unnoticed. The film opens with a truly inventive close-up - one that literally gets under the skin. Also in play: a non-linear chronology, a voiceover by a narrator who might not be entirely reliable, frequent breaking of the fourth wall, and an occasional freeze-frame. As was true of Fincher's other three films, Fight Club is dark and fast-paced. There's not a lot of time for introspection. One could call this MTV style, but, unlike many equally frantic movies, there's a reason for each quick cut beyond preventing viewers from becoming bored.

Perhaps the most discussed aspect of Fight Club will be its attitude towards and graphic depiction of violence. Even before the film's official premiere, voices have been raised claiming that the movie glorifies violence by portraying it as something positive. This was the complaint leveled against A Clockwork Orange, which, less than three decades after its controversial release, is universally regarded as a classic. There's no denying that Fight Club is a violent movie. Some sequences are so brutal that a portion of the viewing audience will turn away. (The scene that caused me to wince was when one character reached into his mouth and pulled out a loose tooth.) But the purpose of showing all this bloody pummeling is to make a telling point about the bestial nature of man and what can happen when the numbing effects of day-to-day drudgery cause people to go a little crazy. The men who become members of Fight Club are victims of the dehumanizing and desensitizing power of modern-day society. They have become cogs in a wheel. The only way they can regain a sense of individuality is by getting in touch with the primal, barbaric instincts of pain and violence.

It remains to be seen whether Fight Club will generate any Oscars. The strength of the writing, direction, and acting justifies a stream of nominations, but quality has never been the driving factor in who is recognized by the Academy. Regardless of how it is received in February, when the nominations are announced, Fight Club is a memorable and superior motion picture - a rare movie that does not abandon insight in its quest to jolt the viewer. This marriage of adrenaline and intelligence will make Fight Club a contender for many Best 10 lists at the end of 1999.
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10
CinemaSinsMay 9, 2015
With its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact,With its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact, Fight Club refuses to be ignored or dismissed. The experience lingers, demanding to be pondered and considered, and, unlike 95% of modern-day thrillers, there is a great deal here to think about and argue over. Fight Club presents an overload of thought-provoking material that works on so many levels as to offer grist for the mills of thousands of reviews, feature articles, and post-screening conversations.

Pre-release interest in Fight Club was understandably high, primarily because of those involved with the project. Jim Uhls' script is based on an influential novel by Chuck Palahniuk (a book that, while not required material in schools, has consumed the free time of countless readers). The lead actor is the ever-popular Brad Pitt, who makes his strongest bid to date to shed his pretty boy image and don the mantle of a serious thespian. Those dubious about Pitt's ability to pull this off in the wake of his recent attempts in Seven Years in Tibet (which is briefly referenced as an in-joke during Fight Club) and Meet Joe Black will suffer a change of heart after seeing this film. Pitt's male co-star, Edward Norton, is widely recognized as one of the most intelligent and versatile performers of his generation. And Fight Club's director, David Fincher, has already made a huge artistic impression on movie-goers with only three features to his credit: Alien 3, Seven (starring Pitt), and The Game. Mix these elements together in Fox's publicity blender, and Fight Club will not carry the title of "Best Movie of 1999 That No One Saw."

Told in a conventional fashion, Fight Club would still have been engaging. However, Fincher's gritty, restless style turns it into a visual masterpiece. The overall experience is every bit as surreal as watching Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange. This is a tale that unfolds in an eerie alternate universe where the melodies of life have the same rhythm as in ours but are in a different key. Fincher also shows just enough restraint that his flourishes seem like important parts of the storytelling method instead of gimmicks. And there are a lot of them. In one scene, a character's apartment is laid out like a page in a furniture catalog, complete with text blurbs superimposed on the screen describing the various pieces. There are occasional single frame interruptions that flash by so quickly that they may pass unnoticed. The film opens with a truly inventive close-up - one that literally gets under the skin. Also in play: a non-linear chronology, a voiceover by a narrator who might not be entirely reliable, frequent breaking of the fourth wall, and an occasional freeze-frame. As was true of Fincher's other three films, Fight Club is dark and fast-paced. There's not a lot of time for introspection. One could call this MTV style, but, unlike many equally frantic movies, there's a reason for each quick cut beyond preventing viewers from becoming bored.

In A Clockwork Orange, Kubrick depicted the actions of the Droogs but did not condone it. This is Fincher's approach in Fight Club. As the film progresses, he systematically reveals each new turn in an ever-deepening spiral that descends into darkness and madness. There's also a heavy element of satire and black comedy. Macabre humor can be found everywhere, from the pithy quips traded by Jack and Tyler to the way Jack interacts with his boss. When combined together, the satire, violence, and unpredictable narrative make a lasting and forceful statement about modern-day society. It's a timely message that hints at why there are post office shootings and kids in schools killing their fellow students. By blaming movies like Fight Club for real-life horrors, politicians want us to look at the world through rose-colored glasses that they have tinted. Instead, Fincher offers a clear, uncompromising portrait that disturbs because it is perceptive and defies the facile answers proffered by elected officials. Movies are not to blame. Guns are not to blame. People and the society that has spawned and stifled them are.

It remains to be seen whether Fight Club will generate any Oscars. The strength of the writing, direction, and acting justifies a stream of nominations, but quality has never been the driving factor in who is recognized by the Academy. Regardless of how it is received in February, when the nominations are announced, Fight Club is a memorable and superior motion picture - a rare movie that does not abandon insight in its quest to jolt the viewer. This marriage of adrenaline and intelligence will make Fight Club a contender for many Best 10 lists at the end of 1999.
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10
markkermodeJun 19, 2015
With its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact,With its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact, Fight Club refuses to be ignored or dismissed. The experience lingers, demanding to be pondered and considered, and, unlike 95% of modern-day thrillers, there is a great deal here to think about and argue over. Fight Club presents an overload of thought-provoking material that works on so many levels as to offer grist for the mills of thousands of reviews, feature articles, and post-screening conversations.

Pre-release interest in Fight Club was understandably high, primarily because of those involved with the project. Jim Uhls' script is based on an influential novel by Chuck Palahniuk (a book that, while not required material in schools, has consumed the free time of countless readers). The lead actor is the ever-popular Brad Pitt, who makes his strongest bid to date to shed his pretty boy image and don the mantle of a serious thespian. Those dubious about Pitt's ability to pull this off in the wake of his recent attempts in Seven Years in Tibet (which is briefly referenced as an in-joke during Fight Club) and Meet Joe Black will suffer a change of heart after seeing this film. Pitt's male co-star, Edward Norton, is widely recognized as one of the most intelligent and versatile performers of his generation. And Fight Club's director, David Fincher, has already made a huge artistic impression on movie-goers with only three features to his credit: Alien 3, Seven (starring Pitt), and The Game. Mix these elements together in Fox's publicity blender, and Fight Club will not carry the title of "Best Movie of 1999 That No One Saw."

In addition to lead actors Pitt, Norton, and Bonham Carter, all of whom do impeccable work, there are a pair of notable supporting players. The first is Meat Loaf (yes, that Meat Loaf), who portrays the ineffectual Bob. It's a surprisingly strong performance, with the singer-turned-actor capturing the nuances of a complex character. Jared Leto, who is becoming better known to audiences (he was recently in The Thin Red Line), is the blond Angel Face.

Told in a conventional fashion, Fight Club would still have been engaging. However, Fincher's gritty, restless style turns it into a visual masterpiece. The overall experience is every bit as surreal as watching Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange. This is a tale that unfolds in an eerie alternate universe where the melodies of life have the same rhythm as in ours but are in a different key. Fincher also shows just enough restraint that his flourishes seem like important parts of the storytelling method instead of gimmicks. And there are a lot of them. In one scene, a character's apartment is laid out like a page in a furniture catalog, complete with text blurbs superimposed on the screen describing the various pieces. There are occasional single frame interruptions that flash by so quickly that they may pass unnoticed. The film opens with a truly inventive close-up - one that literally gets under the skin. Also in play: a non-linear chronology, a voiceover by a narrator who might not be entirely reliable, frequent breaking of the fourth wall, and an occasional freeze-frame. As was true of Fincher's other three films, Fight Club is dark and fast-paced. There's not a lot of time for introspection. One could call this MTV style, but, unlike many equally frantic movies, there's a reason for each quick cut beyond preventing viewers from becoming bored.

In A Clockwork Orange, Kubrick depicted the actions of the Droogs but did not condone it. This is Fincher's approach in Fight Club. As the film progresses, he systematically reveals each new turn in an ever-deepening spiral that descends into darkness and madness. There's also a heavy element of satire and black comedy. Macabre humor can be found everywhere, from the pithy quips traded by Jack and Tyler to the way Jack interacts with his boss. When combined together, the satire, violence, and unpredictable narrative make a lasting and forceful statement about modern-day society. It's a timely message that hints at why there are post office shootings and kids in schools killing their fellow students. By blaming movies like Fight Club for real-life horrors, politicians want us to look at the world through rose-colored glasses that they have tinted. Instead, Fincher offers a clear, uncompromising portrait that disturbs because it is perceptive and defies the facile answers proffered by elected officials. Movies are not to blame. Guns are not to blame. People and the society that has spawned and stifled them are.

Fight Club is a memorable and superior motion picture - a rare movie that does not abandon insight in its quest to jolt the viewer. This marriage of adrenaline and intelligence will make Fight Club a contender for many Best 10 lists at the end of 1999.
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10
Bartholomew123Jul 2, 2015
If you're looking to get punched in the face, then kicked in the mind by a movie. You must watch this. Probably one of my favorite movies. It somehow gets better the second time you watch it!
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10
theepurplepandaOct 11, 2015
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. I knew nothing about Fight Club going in. I'd seen three other Fincher films before this one (this is very different from his other films). I thought it was going to be about a guy in some sort of gang who wants to leave but can't because he'll be killed or something. I was sorta right. Not really. Fight Club is about a guy named Edward Norton who starts a fight club that gets out of hand or about a guy trying to figure out who he is and what his purpose is in life or about a guy with multiple personality disorder. Maybe, all three. It was filmed in 1999 by David Fincher. Apparently, it's based off a 1996 novel of the same name. I'm actually okay with having watched the movie first because I bet it was better than the novel.

Edward is a super likable character. Not only do you really care about him but also about his very relatable feelings of unimportance. But the one thing that makes him the most likable is his voice overs. Voice overs make movies so much more fun to watch and really let you understand how the character thinks and observes things. Shawshank and American Psycho are the two best examples I can think of right now. I just realized all those films are based on novels. That's what books have always had over movies. You are in the character's head seeing things through their eyes. You end up bonding with the main character more and you care much more about what happens to them. Voice overs are a great way to bring this aspect into film.

I loved how natural the fight club was. If an idiot made this film, the fight club would have been formed in the first ten minutes because of a random sequence of consequential events. Instead, every thing slowly ends up happening. A bunch of small choices and moments led to the fight club being formed. Edward's personality shows why a guy like him would start such a club and because of this everything that happens in the movie feels natural and not forced to make the movie more suspenseful or fun. In Gravity, everything bad that could ever happen ends up happening to Sandra Bullock. This is a cheap and lazy way to keep the movie interesting. Everything in Fight Club just feels more real and it's much harder to not be sucked into the film.

It's great that they put the enjoyment of the movie before it's meaning. I felt that instead of shoving a bunch of symbolism and philosophical questions down your throat (looking at you Matrix), it makes sure the movie stays fun and interesting and treats it's meaning like icing on a wonderful cake. Not saying that the film's meaning isn't important but enjoyability should come first. I'm sure I can't be the only one who noticed but it really felt like fight club was a lot like self harm. Literally and metaphorically. They are hurting themselves with intense pain to make everything else more numb. Or smaller things like when in the restaurant, Edward gets offered a smoke and he says he doesn't smoke. Two or three scenes later he's smoking while walking down the street.

10/10 -- Masterpiece.I really can't think of anything wrong with this movie and everyone should watch it at least once. I might have to start watching all of Fincher's other movies and make a best to worst list. Also, the close up scenes were the coolest and I won't forget to mention the awesome Tyler Durden job scene.

P.S. I know I didn't mention Tyler Durden. It didn't feel appropriate since they are both the same person.
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10
Dingo-_-2007Nov 24, 2015
The film is just so incredibly different from any other films out there and it's really, really good. The acting from everyone is top notch and it's really something different. I you haven't watched it, go watch it.
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8
PetitBikiniJan 17, 2016
There are no dull moments in this film. It lasts over two hours and not once did I not care about what's going on. "Fight Club" is a great film to watch - it has the appeal of a summer blockbuster and allegories of a deep indie movie thatThere are no dull moments in this film. It lasts over two hours and not once did I not care about what's going on. "Fight Club" is a great film to watch - it has the appeal of a summer blockbuster and allegories of a deep indie movie that nobody has seen. Expand
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10
aadityamudharApr 18, 2016
Great film; negative reviews here often reflect a sloppy or down-right non-existent understanding of the movie. Case in point: "..spend two hours wondering why the characters would rather punch each other than do something useful with theirGreat film; negative reviews here often reflect a sloppy or down-right non-existent understanding of the movie. Case in point: "..spend two hours wondering why the characters would rather punch each other than do something useful with their time and energy." - Alexander G. Now obviously, anyone who was actually attentive to the movie knows that they DID do something useful, and they fought for a reason. Expand
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10
TheMovieDoctorJan 7, 2016
With its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact,With its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact, Fight Club refuses to be ignored or dismissed. The experience lingers, demanding to be pondered and considered, and, unlike 95% of modern-day thrillers, there is a great deal here to think about and argue over. Fight Club presents an overload of thought-provoking material that works on so many levels as to offer grist for the mills of thousands of reviews, feature articles, and post-screening conversations.

Pre-release interest in Fight Club was understandably high, primarily because of those involved with the project. Jim Uhls' script is based on an influential novel by Chuck Palahniuk (a book that, while not required material in schools, has consumed the free time of countless readers). The lead actor is the ever-popular Brad Pitt, who makes his strongest bid to date to shed his pretty boy image and don the mantle of a serious thespian. Those dubious about Pitt's ability to pull this off in the wake of his recent attempts in Seven Years in Tibet (which is briefly referenced as an in-joke during Fight Club) and Meet Joe Black will suffer a change of heart after seeing this film. Pitt's male co-star, Edward Norton, is widely recognized as one of the most intelligent and versatile performers of his generation. And Fight Club's director, David Fincher, has already made a huge artistic impression on movie-goers with only three features to his credit: Alien 3, Seven (starring Pitt), and The Game. Mix these elements together in Fox's publicity blender, and Fight Club will not carry the title of "Best Movie of 1999 That No One Saw."

Told in a conventional fashion, Fight Club would still have been engaging. However, Fincher's gritty, restless style turns it into a visual masterpiece. The overall experience is every bit as surreal as watching Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange. This is a tale that unfolds in an eerie alternate universe where the melodies of life have the same rhythm as in ours but are in a different key. Fincher also shows just enough restraint that his flourishes seem like important parts of the storytelling method instead of gimmicks. And there are a lot of them. In one scene, a character's apartment is laid out like a page in a furniture catalog, complete with text blurbs superimposed on the screen describing the various pieces. There are occasional single frame interruptions that flash by so quickly that they may pass unnoticed. The film opens with a truly inventive close-up - one that literally gets under the skin. Also in play: a non-linear chronology, a voiceover by a narrator who might not be entirely reliable, frequent breaking of the fourth wall, and an occasional freeze-frame. As was true of Fincher's other three films, Fight Club is dark and fast-paced. There's not a lot of time for introspection. One could call this MTV style, but, unlike many equally frantic movies, there's a reason for each quick cut beyond preventing viewers from becoming bored.

Perhaps the most discussed aspect of Fight Club will be its attitude towards and graphic depiction of violence. Even before the film's official premiere, voices have been raised claiming that the movie glorifies violence by portraying it as something positive. This was the complaint leveled against A Clockwork Orange, which, less than three decades after its controversial release, is universally regarded as a classic. There's no denying that Fight Club is a violent movie. Some sequences are so brutal that a portion of the viewing audience will turn away. (The scene that caused me to wince was when one character reached into his mouth and pulled out a loose tooth.) But the purpose of showing all this bloody pummeling is to make a telling point about the bestial nature of man and what can happen when the numbing effects of day-to-day drudgery cause people to go a little crazy. The men who become members of Fight Club are victims of the dehumanizing and desensitizing power of modern-day society. They have become cogs in a wheel. The only way they can regain a sense of individuality is by getting in touch with the primal, barbaric instincts of pain and violence.

It remains to be seen whether Fight Club will generate any Oscars. The strength of the writing, direction, and acting justifies a stream of nominations, but quality has never been the driving factor in who is recognized by the Academy. Regardless of how it is received in February, when the nominations are announced, Fight Club is a memorable and superior motion picture - a rare movie that does not abandon insight in its quest to jolt the viewer. This marriage of adrenaline and intelligence will make Fight Club a contender for many Best 10 lists at the end of 1999.
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9
PachekoviskMar 16, 2016
EXCELLENT
The First rule of fight club is:
You do not talk about Fight Club

The Second rule of Fight Club is:
You DO NOT TALK ABOUT FIGHT CLUB

I'll not break the rules.
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10
CinemassacreMar 13, 2016
From “Alien3” through “Seven” and “The Game,” David Fincher has always been attracted to dark material. In Chuck Palahniuk’s novel of the same name about a cult of men who channel their pent-up physical aggression into increasinglyFrom “Alien3” through “Seven” and “The Game,” David Fincher has always been attracted to dark material. In Chuck Palahniuk’s novel of the same name about a cult of men who channel their pent-up physical aggression into increasingly destructive pursuits, the director has found his most disturbing subject matter yet. And in debuting screenwriter Jim Uhls’ clever, savagely witty script and the unremitting volley of information it launches, Fincher has found the perfect countermeasures to balance his coldly atmospheric, often distancing style.

The position on violence here can be read on a number of levels. Somewhat controversially in light of the post-Littleton, Colo., debate, “Fight Club” plays mischievously with film conventions, almost winking at the audience to convey the characters’ awareness of being part of a movie that deals in hot-button issues. This rather audaciously gives the impression of a film throwing the responsibility for violence back onto society and refusing to accept blame.

Set in an unidentified, semi-stylized city, the story’s nameless narrator (Edward Norton) is introduced with a gun in his mouth before backing up six months to recap his troubles with insomnia. Refusing to treat him, a doctor instructs him instead to sit in on a testicular cancer victims’ group to put his own pain in perspective. He quickly becomes addicted to support groups for a range of terminal illnesses, freely weeping and embracing his “fellow” sufferers as a means to find the release he needs to sleep.

But the arrival of another tourist, Marla Singer (Helena Bonham Carter), makes him uncomfortable with his dishonesty. Her blithe admission that the support groups are “cheaper than a movie and there’s free coffee” is one of many instances in which pitch-black, corrosive humor touches subjects that will make many audiences blanch with indignation.

Around this time, he meets enigmatic Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt), who makes and sells soap for a living while moonlighting as a projectionist, splicing pornographic images into family films, and as a waiter, sabotaging meals. When the narrator’s apartment and all his diligently accumulated material possessions are destroyed in a freak explosion, he calls Tyler for a place to stay.

They meet at a bar and get tanked together, after which Tyler amicably picks a fight that seals their bond and marks the beginning of a phenomenon that each week attracts new participants. The narrator moves into the dilapidated mansion in a toxic waste area that Tyler calls home, routinely continuing his job all week as an auto safety checker but waiting for the charge that comes with fighting each Saturday night in a club whose members are sworn to secrecy.

A persuasive speaker who encourages a lost generation of men to access pain as a remedy for contemporary despair and numbness, Tyler’s following quickly grows. Fight club chapters start springing up across the country and when Tyler begins assigning homework, the members take their aggressive behavior into the outside world with acts of violence, vandalism and subversiveness. His disciples start turning up at the house to enlist in an army for Project Mayhem, the full extent of which is only gradually revealed.

The narrator’s feelings veer from rejection and abandonment after Tyler’s sudden disappearance to moral revulsion as he sets out to stop a dramatic chain of events and is brought face to face with discoveries regarding his true nature that provide the story’s big twist.

Pitt is cool, charismatic and more dynamically physical perhaps than he has been since his breakthrough role in “Thelma and Louise,” while Bonham Carter, outfitted like a gothic prom queen and spouting acerbic maxims with attitude to burn, demolishes any residue of her buttoned-up Merchant-Ivory image in a tough, sharp-edged turn.

In a film that requires the viewer to keep absorbing information for most of its two-hours-plus duration, Fincher never loosens his grip on the material, with editor James Haygood contributing to establish a driving pace. As always with the director’s work, visual aspects are consistently impressive, from Alex McDowell’s richly elaborate, at times a little too slick production design to the drained, often greenish or jaundiced tones of d.p. Jeff Cronenweth’s extremely mobile widescreen lensing, which includes several knockout sequences in which the camera careens through skin tissue, electrical circuitry or bomb wiring. Also notable are the complex sound design and dreamy techno score by the Dust Brothers (Michael Simpson, John King).
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10
MovieMasterEdMar 22, 2016
With its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact,With its kinetic style, visceral approach, compelling storyline, and powerful social message, Fight Club makes a commanding case to be considered the '90s version of A Clockwork Orange. In a time when so few motion pictures leave an impact, Fight Club refuses to be ignored or dismissed. The experience lingers, demanding to be pondered and considered, and, unlike 95% of modern-day thrillers, there is a great deal here to think about and argue over. Fight Club presents an overload of thought-provoking material that works on so many levels as to offer grist for the mills of thousands of reviews, feature articles, and post-screening conversations.

Pre-release interest in Fight Club was understandably high, primarily because of those involved with the project. Jim Uhls' script is based on an influential novel by Chuck Palahniuk (a book that, while not required material in schools, has consumed the free time of countless readers). The lead actor is the ever-popular Brad Pitt, who makes his strongest bid to date to shed his pretty boy image and don the mantle of a serious thespian. Those dubious about Pitt's ability to pull this off in the wake of his recent attempts in Seven Years in Tibet (which is briefly referenced as an in-joke during Fight Club) and Meet Joe Black will suffer a change of heart after seeing this film. Pitt's male co-star, Edward Norton, is widely recognized as one of the most intelligent and versatile performers of his generation. And Fight Club's director, David Fincher, has already made a huge artistic impression on movie-goers with only three features to his credit: Alien 3, Seven (starring Pitt), and The Game. Mix these elements together in Fox's publicity blender, and Fight Club will not carry the title of "Best Movie of 1999 That No One Saw."

In addition to lead actors Pitt, Norton, and Bonham Carter, all of whom do impeccable work, there are a pair of notable supporting players. The first is Meat Loaf (yes, that Meat Loaf), who portrays the ineffectual Bob. It's a surprisingly strong performance, with the singer-turned-actor capturing the nuances of a complex character. Jared Leto, who is becoming better known to audiences (he was recently in The Thin Red Line), is the blond Angel Face.

Told in a conventional fashion, Fight Club would still have been engaging. However, Fincher's gritty, restless style turns it into a visual masterpiece. The overall experience is every bit as surreal as watching Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange. This is a tale that unfolds in an eerie alternate universe where the melodies of life have the same rhythm as in ours but are in a different key. Fincher also shows just enough restraint that his flourishes seem like important parts of the storytelling method instead of gimmicks. And there are a lot of them. In one scene, a character's apartment is laid out like a page in a furniture catalog, complete with text blurbs superimposed on the screen describing the various pieces. There are occasional single frame interruptions that flash by so quickly that they may pass unnoticed. The film opens with a truly inventive close-up - one that literally gets under the skin. Also in play: a non-linear chronology, a voiceover by a narrator who might not be entirely reliable, frequent breaking of the fourth wall, and an occasional freeze-frame. As was true of Fincher's other three films, Fight Club is dark and fast-paced. There's not a lot of time for introspection. One could call this MTV style, but, unlike many equally frantic movies, there's a reason for each quick cut beyond preventing viewers from becoming bored.

Perhaps the most discussed aspect of Fight Club will be its attitude towards and graphic depiction of violence. Even before the film's official premiere, voices have been raised claiming that the movie glorifies violence by portraying it as something positive. This was the complaint leveled against A Clockwork Orange, which, less than three decades after its controversial release, is universally regarded as a classic. There's no denying that Fight Club is a violent movie. Some sequences are so brutal that a portion of the viewing audience will turn away. (The scene that caused me to wince was when one character reached into his mouth and pulled out a loose tooth.) But the purpose of showing all this bloody pummeling is to make a telling point about the bestial nature of man and what can happen when the numbing effects of day-to-day drudgery cause people to go a little crazy. The men who become members of Fight Club are victims of the dehumanizing and desensitizing power of modern-day society. They have become cogs in a wheel. The only way they can regain a sense of individuality is by getting in touch with the primal, barbaric instincts of pain and violence.

Fight Club is a memorable and superior motion picture - a rare movie that does not abandon insight in its quest to jolt the viewer.
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10
ReelViews94Mar 23, 2016
From “Alien3” through “Seven” and “The Game,” David Fincher has always been attracted to dark material. In Chuck Palahniuk’s novel of the same name about a cult of men who channel their pent-up physical aggression into increasinglyFrom “Alien3” through “Seven” and “The Game,” David Fincher has always been attracted to dark material. In Chuck Palahniuk’s novel of the same name about a cult of men who channel their pent-up physical aggression into increasingly destructive pursuits, the director has found his most disturbing subject matter yet. And in debuting screenwriter Jim Uhls’ clever, savagely witty script and the unremitting volley of information it launches, Fincher has found the perfect countermeasures to balance his coldly atmospheric, often distancing style.

The position on violence here can be read on a number of levels. Somewhat controversially in light of the post-Littleton, Colo., debate, “Fight Club” plays mischievously with film conventions, almost winking at the audience to convey the characters’ awareness of being part of a movie that deals in hot-button issues. This rather audaciously gives the impression of a film throwing the responsibility for violence back onto society and refusing to accept blame.

Set in an unidentified, semi-stylized city, the story’s nameless narrator (Edward Norton) is introduced with a gun in his mouth before backing up six months to recap his troubles with insomnia. Refusing to treat him, a doctor instructs him instead to sit in on a testicular cancer victims’ group to put his own pain in perspective. He quickly becomes addicted to support groups for a range of terminal illnesses, freely weeping and embracing his “fellow” sufferers as a means to find the release he needs to sleep.

But the arrival of another tourist, Marla Singer (Helena Bonham Carter), makes him uncomfortable with his dishonesty. Her blithe admission that the support groups are “cheaper than a movie and there’s free coffee” is one of many instances in which pitch-black, corrosive humor touches subjects that will make many audiences blanch with indignation.

Around this time, he meets enigmatic Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt), who makes and sells soap for a living while moonlighting as a projectionist, splicing pornographic images into family films, and as a waiter, sabotaging meals. When the narrator’s apartment and all his diligently accumulated material possessions are destroyed in a freak explosion, he calls Tyler for a place to stay.

They meet at a bar and get tanked together, after which Tyler amicably picks a fight that seals their bond and marks the beginning of a phenomenon that each week attracts new participants. The narrator moves into the dilapidated mansion in a toxic waste area that Tyler calls home, routinely continuing his job all week as an auto safety checker but waiting for the charge that comes with fighting each Saturday night in a club whose members are sworn to secrecy.

A persuasive speaker who encourages a lost generation of men to access pain as a remedy for contemporary despair and numbness, Tyler’s following quickly grows. Fight club chapters start springing up across the country and when Tyler begins assigning homework, the members take their aggressive behavior into the outside world with acts of violence, vandalism and subversiveness. His disciples start turning up at the house to enlist in an army for Project Mayhem, the full extent of which is only gradually revealed.

The narrator’s feelings veer from rejection and abandonment after Tyler’s sudden disappearance to moral revulsion as he sets out to stop a dramatic chain of events and is brought face to face with discoveries regarding his true nature that provide the story’s big twist.

Pitt is cool, charismatic and more dynamically physical perhaps than he has been since his breakthrough role in “Thelma and Louise,” while Bonham Carter, outfitted like a gothic prom queen and spouting acerbic maxims with attitude to burn, demolishes any residue of her buttoned-up Merchant-Ivory image in a tough, sharp-edged turn.

In a film that requires the viewer to keep absorbing information for most of its two-hours-plus duration, Fincher never loosens his grip on the material, with editor James Haygood contributing to establish a driving pace. As always with the director’s work, visual aspects are consistently impressive, from Alex McDowell’s richly elaborate, at times a little too slick production design to the drained, often greenish or jaundiced tones of d.p. Jeff Cronenweth’s extremely mobile widescreen lensing, which includes several knockout sequences in which the camera careens through skin tissue, electrical circuitry or bomb wiring. Also notable are the complex sound design and dreamy techno score by the Dust Brothers (Michael Simpson, John King).
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MovieMasterEddyApr 3, 2016
From “Alien3” through “Seven” and “The Game,” David Fincher has always been attracted to dark material. In Chuck Palahniuk’s novel of the same name about a cult of men who channel their pent-up physical aggression into increasinglyFrom “Alien3” through “Seven” and “The Game,” David Fincher has always been attracted to dark material. In Chuck Palahniuk’s novel of the same name about a cult of men who channel their pent-up physical aggression into increasingly destructive pursuits, the director has found his most disturbing subject matter yet. And in debuting screenwriter Jim Uhls’ clever, savagely witty script and the unremitting volley of information it launches, Fincher has found the perfect countermeasures to balance his coldly atmospheric, often distancing style.

The position on violence here can be read on a number of levels. Somewhat controversially in light of the post-Littleton, Colo., debate, “Fight Club” plays mischievously with film conventions, almost winking at the audience to convey the characters’ awareness of being part of a movie that deals in hot-button issues. This rather audaciously gives the impression of a film throwing the responsibility for violence back onto society and refusing to accept blame.

Set in an unidentified, semi-stylized city, the story’s nameless narrator (Edward Norton) is introduced with a gun in his mouth before backing up six months to recap his troubles with insomnia. Refusing to treat him, a doctor instructs him instead to sit in on a testicular cancer victims’ group to put his own pain in perspective. He quickly becomes addicted to support groups for a range of terminal illnesses, freely weeping and embracing his “fellow” sufferers as a means to find the release he needs to sleep.

But the arrival of another tourist, Marla Singer (Helena Bonham Carter), makes him uncomfortable with his dishonesty. Her blithe admission that the support groups are “cheaper than a movie and there’s free coffee” is one of many instances in which pitch-black, corrosive humor touches subjects that will make many audiences blanch with indignation.

Around this time, he meets enigmatic Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt), who makes and sells soap for a living while moonlighting as a projectionist, splicing pornographic images into family films, and as a waiter, sabotaging meals. When the narrator’s apartment and all his diligently accumulated material possessions are destroyed in a freak explosion, he calls Tyler for a place to stay.

They meet at a bar and get tanked together, after which Tyler amicably picks a fight that seals their bond and marks the beginning of a phenomenon that each week attracts new participants. The narrator moves into the dilapidated mansion in a toxic waste area that Tyler calls home, routinely continuing his job all week as an auto safety checker but waiting for the charge that comes with fighting each Saturday night in a club whose members are sworn to secrecy.

A persuasive speaker who encourages a lost generation of men to access pain as a remedy for contemporary despair and numbness, Tyler’s following quickly grows. Fight club chapters start springing up across the country and when Tyler begins assigning homework, the members take their aggressive behavior into the outside world with acts of violence, vandalism and subversiveness. His disciples start turning up at the house to enlist in an army for Project Mayhem, the full extent of which is only gradually revealed.

The narrator’s feelings veer from rejection and abandonment after Tyler’s sudden disappearance to moral revulsion as he sets out to stop a dramatic chain of events and is brought face to face with discoveries regarding his true nature that provide the story’s big twist.

Pitt is cool, charismatic and more dynamically physical perhaps than he has been since his breakthrough role in “Thelma and Louise,” while Bonham Carter, outfitted like a gothic prom queen and spouting acerbic maxims with attitude to burn, demolishes any residue of her buttoned-up Merchant-Ivory image in a tough, sharp-edged turn.

In a film that requires the viewer to keep absorbing information for most of its two-hours-plus duration, Fincher never loosens his grip on the material, with editor James Haygood contributing to establish a driving pace. As always with the director’s work, visual aspects are consistently impressive, from Alex McDowell’s richly elaborate, at times a little too slick production design to the drained, often greenish or jaundiced tones of d.p. Jeff Cronenweth’s extremely mobile widescreen lensing, which includes several knockout sequences in which the camera careens through skin tissue, electrical circuitry or bomb wiring. Also notable are the complex sound design and dreamy techno score by the Dust Brothers (Michael Simpson, John King).
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10
overlordofgeekAug 16, 2016
One of the best quality good movie. I've watched This movie really made my life
I was able to change. The acting, the lines, the script is really great.
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7
TheArchetypesSep 9, 2016
Fight Club might qualify Fincher as the Orson Welles among the new crop of directors--even I can't totally dispel that notion--but the central stupidity of this movie isn't something Welles would have touched with a ten-foot pole, or at theFight Club might qualify Fincher as the Orson Welles among the new crop of directors--even I can't totally dispel that notion--but the central stupidity of this movie isn't something Welles would have touched with a ten-foot pole, or at the very least he would have molded into something more complex and fascinating(ala Lady from Shanghai or Touch of Evil--movies based on pulp but illuminating as well as dark on the subject of the human soul). Surely, there have been worse cases of remarkable filmic talent in service of pretentious, sensationalistic trash but few have been so effective and entertaining as this which further complicates the issue. The theme is about how modern society has reduced males into enneuchs and how this warps our subconscious into anarcho-fascist mode, but really... why not just go to the health club and work out a sweat? Norton is brilliant as usual; far more surprising is how Pitt not only holds his own against the great Norton but even outshines him on occasion. Ultimately however, too infantile and stupid to be called irresponsible. This is movie as monumental heavy metal song with punk-rock riffs thrown in for good measure. Expand
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9
JunelKeanJul 3, 2017
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. The first rule of Fight Club is you don't talk about Fight Club, granted in this review. So, Spoiler Alert! David Fincher is known for his dark tones in his works and this movie is one example of his influential and important contribution in cinema.

A miserable guy who is named as the Narrator (Norton) experiencing insomnia meets a soap salesman named Tyler Durden (Pitt), and soon become friends. They formed a club where men could fight each other with several rules, until Marla Singer (Bonham-Carter) shows up and falls in love with Tyler who is only the unconscious of the Narrator!

Fincher's technique to tell the story structure make this film a perfect enticement. Apart from having perfect castings from the three lead actors, it is their souls and roles that shine in each and every scenario.

It is based from a novel by Chuck Palahniuk, and stays faithful to its source material with only few differences, but still, it has a great screenplay by Jim Uhls with proper pacing and humorous dialogues. The script does not only deal about the plot itself, but also delves into the layers of personas and themes of consumerism and prejudice. But what surprises the audience, is the twisted ending which really works in the film.

VERDICT: A provocative yet mind-blowing satire which is more than you can ever think of.
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10
JewstuffsNov 20, 2016
**** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** off **** seroiusly **** off
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9
MetaflixJan 20, 2017
Palahniuk. Fincher. Pitt. Norton. The four horsemen of Pulp Fiction's mayhem. The film hit American audiences at just the right time, high tide of the Dot-com boom, silencing the party like a record scratch and inspiring both the comfortedPalahniuk. Fincher. Pitt. Norton. The four horsemen of Pulp Fiction's mayhem. The film hit American audiences at just the right time, high tide of the Dot-com boom, silencing the party like a record scratch and inspiring both the comforted and the afflicted to want to paint a self-portrait, build a house, or maybe just blow some **** up. Expand
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10
Cameronius_113May 1, 2017
Fight Club was released in 1999 and was directed by David Fincher. The film is about an office worker (Edward Norton) who is unhappy with his current life, however when he meets the rebellious Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt), he gains confidence toFight Club was released in 1999 and was directed by David Fincher. The film is about an office worker (Edward Norton) who is unhappy with his current life, however when he meets the rebellious Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt), he gains confidence to prove his humanity.

Watching Fight Club was without a doubt one of the most unique viewing experiences I've ever had. The film excels in delivering its themes and social commentaries on a human level that the audience can relate with, as we all must dream at some point we can be like a person such as Tyler Durden; confident, no fear and not a care in the world.

The film is ultimately a satire (albeit a very dark one) as we see the world through the perspective of Edward Norton's character (known as 'The Narrator'). The audience can relate to both characters of The Narrator and Tyler Durden as they are almost complete opposites of each other, yet we've all felt like both of their characters at some point; we understand these characters and they understand us back. Norton and Pitt also give fantastic performances and you instantly know that these two are the perfect duo.

Every time something brutal occurs in Fight Club it has extreme significance; every single punch is each character proving who they are and their humanity, none of it is thrown in just to simply shock the audience. Whenever fights occur, the viewer feels like they're in there with the opponents too. The entire film is a battle, with the opponents fighting physically and characters fighting themselves psychologically as well, with the physical fights being a physical representation of the battles they have within themselves. All of these sorts of things in the film constantly toy with the viewer's emotions due to how close you feel to them.

The way the film is directed is brilliant; director David Fincher directs each scene with lots of energy and also includes many interesting details in shots too. Some camera techniques used include focusing simply just on the object directly in front of the camera which works well in scenes with Edward Norton's character, displaying how he feels alone and how there is no world around him. Even scenes like the opening title sequence are directed in a fashion which makes them exciting to watch.

Overall, Fight Club is an excellent film that all of us can relate to easily, and can also possibly learn something from too. There's much more to the film than what's on the surface and also much more than I have stated in this review, however plenty of it is amazing to experience yourself while watching the film. Fight Club will definitely stay relevant for many years to come and will continue to toy with people's emotions constantly, and if you haven't seen Fight Club then I don't have a clue what you're doing with your life.

8.9/10

Yeah, I know I wasn't supposed to talk about it. But it's so good it's impossible not to
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