Universal Pictures | Release Date: October 8, 2004
7.7
USER SCORE
Generally favorable reviews based on 55 Ratings
USER RATING DISTRIBUTION
Positive:
41
Mixed:
11
Negative:
3
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10
DanielVJun 22, 2009
You have to be into sports especially football to really appreciate this work.
1 of 1 users found this helpful
10
TylerDJul 28, 2007
One of the best, if not THE best sports film of all time. Myself being a fan of Explosions in the Sky only improves how much I enjoyed the movie, as well. Billy Bob Thorton at his best.
1 of 1 users found this helpful
9
RitaP.Jan 30, 2006
Great moving film, you don't need to love gridiron to throroughly enjoy it. If you rent the DVD, the special features especially the doco on the 88 Permian Panthers is well worth watching too.
0 of 0 users found this helpful
8
FraserW.Mar 12, 2006
In my opinion i look at Remember the Titans and The Longest Yard but none of them can even compare with Friday Night Lights.
0 of 0 users found this helpful
7
MarkB.Oct 12, 2004
It's a good thing that James "Radio" Kennedy, the mentally challenged kid played by Cuba Gooding, Jr. in Radio, the sentimental football drama released almost exactly a year ago, hung around the high school football team in Anderson, SC It's a good thing that James "Radio" Kennedy, the mentally challenged kid played by Cuba Gooding, Jr. in Radio, the sentimental football drama released almost exactly a year ago, hung around the high school football team in Anderson, SC rather than the Odessa, TX one depicted here. Chances are, if he'd even come close to interrupting or disrupting a practice, the subhuman, mouth-breathing football worshippers of the town (which, according to Friday Night Lights, pretty much consists of ALL the town) would've beaten him to within a half-inch of his life and left him for dead near the exit ramp. Exceedingly well made but profoundly (and necessarily) depressing and disturbing, Peter Berg's account of the Panthers' 1988 season comes off as so virulently anti-football and anti-football culture that it makes North Dallas Forty look like Knute Rockne, All American by comparison! Don't blame the doctor, though, for accurately diagnosing the sickness (although, come to think of it, one of the film's characters does just that!) This is a town where gridiron boosterism degenerates to Nuremberg Rally levels; where the father who gets the most screen time is a drunken, abusive cretin (courageously played by country icon Tim McGraw) who harrasses his son repeatedly and endlessly about dropping the ball--if you ever wanted to make an argument for the mandatory sterilization of unfit fathers, there's Exhibit A! Even the superficially sympathetic coach (Billy Bob Thornton, following up Bad Santa and The Alamo with his third all-time world class performance) is in no way to be confused with the altruistic and heroic Davy Crockett; beneath all the apparent heart-to-heart talks with the players and Big Speeches in the locker room is a completely self-serving opportunist who sees his players not as human beings but only as means to his own survival. (If you're not convinced of the latter point, go back and study how Berg films the coach's removal of the players' labels in the final scenes.) With his relentless, nervous camerawork, use of dark, gritty textures and endless uncomfortably extreme close-ups, Berg has made a film that looks a whole lot more like a prison documentary than a sports movie, and I think that's the whole point: the team's moments of joy, triumph or elation are extremely fleeting while pain, agony and frustration are dwelt upon almost to the level of the crucifixion in a certain controversial Mel Gibson-made movie. (There's not even much fun to be had in the early, post-game party sequences: the two sexual encounters we see result immediately in emotional rawness not often seen outside the films of Neil LaBute.) Don't forget: the co-writer/director is the same Peter Berg who a few years ago gave us Very Bad Things, a slashing, darker-than-dark satire (which I think I was the only person in the world not related to Berg who actually liked!) about people who absolutely don't care who they hurt (or, more often, kill) to get their share of The American Dream. One word I hope to God nobody uses to describe Berg's current film is "inspirational"--unless, of course, it means inspiring Monday Night Football watchers to switch to watching the Lifetime Original Monday Night Movie with the missus and never watching football again! Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful
10
JoeyG.Jun 2, 2006
If i could give this a 11 i would give it a 15 this is the best sports movie ive seen and one of the best movies overall ive seen........i was blown away by the amazing passion and hear the actors were able to put in this amazing sports story.
0 of 0 users found this helpful
10
JacobC.Apr 19, 2006
Greatest Football Movie since the Progam this movie was awesome.
0 of 0 users found this helpful
8
Compi24Dec 6, 2012
Thanks to winning performances from Thornton and others, "Friday Night Lights" lifts itself above the conventional inspirational sports drama by relaying a deliberately honest message and never deterring from it.
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
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10
37othApr 10, 2013
This movies is truly great because of the way he portrays the "Texas" way of life.
Peter Berg also did a pretty great job in developing characters because you can really relate to them.
Ending of the movie is heartbreaking and I would
This movies is truly great because of the way he portrays the "Texas" way of life.
Peter Berg also did a pretty great job in developing characters because you can really relate to them.
Ending of the movie is heartbreaking and I would strongly recommend this movie to everyone, even if you're not a football fan.
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