Metascore
80

Generally favorable reviews - based on 38 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 35 out of 38
  2. Negative: 0 out of 38
Watch On
  1. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    100
    It's hard to imagine how a film built around one-on-one interviews could be entertaining, but Frost/Nixon could not be more enthralling.
  2. Reviewed by: Perry Seibert
    100
    The craftsmanship, acting, and history lesson all make it among the most satisfying films of Ron Howard's career.
  3. Reviewed by: Staff (Not credited)
    100
    A totally mesmerizing battle of the wills between the occasionally charming yet wily Nixon and the increasingly desperate Frost.
  4. 100
    Frank Langella and Michael Sheen do not attempt to mimic their characters, but to embody them.
  5. Morgan finds the right elements of action and character through which to make history leap off the page.
  6. Langella has always been a cerebral actor, one who never gives away all he's thinking. What comes through in this portrayal is how smart Nixon was, whether he's cunningly probing Frost's weaknesses or pitching himself to TV viewers as an avuncular, misunderstood Cold Warrior.
  7. Surges with an energy and visual verve that improve the play and enhance the themes of dramatist Peter Morgan's script.
  8. 91
    In a masterful performance, Langella highlights Nixon's oily charm and guile.
  9. The result is involving, engrossing cinema -- more thrilling, in fact, than Howard's "The Da Vinci Code" -- filmmaking of a type rarely seen anymore and sorely missed.
  10. What Ron Howard gets, to a degree that's astonishing in a two-hour film, is the density and complexity, as well as the generous entertainment quotient, of Peter Morgan's screenplay.
  11. 88
    Howard and Morgan have transformed this story into something more than an embellished re-telling of recent history. They have shaped a tragedy that is almost Shakespearean in force.
  12. 88
    Director Ron Howard has turned Peter Morgan's stage success into a grabber of a movie laced with tension, stinging wit and potent human drama.
  13. 88
    Sheen, who is also reprising his stage role and appeared as Tony Blair in the Morgan-written "The Queen," is highly effective as Frost - though the stakes for Frost are nowhere near as interesting as those for Nixon.
  14. 88
    Ron Howard has made his best movie with Frost/Nixon, an electric political drama with a skin-prickling immediacy.
  15. Throughout, it's clouded -- for me at least -- by a nagging sense that it's straining too hard to build the media clash into more of an historic event than it was.
  16. 83
    The result is a totally absorbing and entertaining film, one of the best historical dramas from Hollywood in many years.
User Score
7.8

Generally favorable reviews- based on 142 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 42 out of 48
  2. Negative: 5 out of 48
  1. Aug 25, 2014
    10
    A fascinating and refreshing look at Nixon post-Presidency. Langella and Sheen impeccably personify Nixon and Frost. Ron Howard is able toA fascinating and refreshing look at Nixon post-Presidency. Langella and Sheen impeccably personify Nixon and Frost. Ron Howard is able to take Peter Morgan's stimulating screenplay and make a captivating historical drama. Full Review »
  2. May 25, 2014
    8
    The acting in the film is quite remarkable which only made the interviews that much better. The fast pace and great script made for anThe acting in the film is quite remarkable which only made the interviews that much better. The fast pace and great script made for an absorbing film but when Frost and Nixon finally sit down face to face, the magic really begins. Full Review »
  3. Nov 7, 2013
    10
    This is a study of character and realisation, Frost/Nixon aims to delve into the interviews that took place between the former PresidentThis is a study of character and realisation, Frost/Nixon aims to delve into the interviews that took place between the former President Richard Nixon and British “talk show host” David Frost, it doesn’t delve into political motives or side-tracking corruption,only the men who sat in two chairs for a series of interviews, Frost, a choice that surprised many, was a man living a flamboyant life while also having television shows in Australia that were not anything close to the journalistic prowess that the public were expecting to take on the guilty President, yet the film outlines in dramatised form, how much of the process of these interviews and payments came largely from Frost’s own pocket. The film kicks off with snippets of news programs all those years ago as the Watergate scandal was revealed, but also how there was evidence of a cover-up by the President of the United States. The film is a close tailing of Frost as he decides to be the first person to interview the disgraced former President, he has no TV channels behind him or any concrete advertising, but all this acts as part of the mindset that this young presenter is in, he is in it really to rejuvenate his career and for it to mean something again, but his team of researchers, and of course, the nation, want him to press the President for a confession of his involvement in a cover-up, a point at the beginning of the interview process that Frost bites off a little more than he can chew, seemingly unprepared for the onslaught of anecdotes and stonewalling he received from Nixon. Michael Sheen takes on the role of Frost, a role he also played in the stage version of the show, while Nixon is played by Frank Langella, who also appeared in the same stage production. These two actors deliver fine performances, Sheen takes the stance in his character that he has nothing to lose with these interviews, yet when he is getting nowhere with his attempts at picking apart Nixon, he soon sees how it could all come crashing down, Langella perfectly incorporates the mannerisms and speech of Nixon, whose booming voice was one of his memorable qualities, but Langella also shows a man with regret and loneliness in his eyes, at some points even seeming like he wanted to confess, but remember, this is dramatised, because we don’t really know the type of relationship these two had other than in front of the cameras, but a certain scene which didn’t happen was added in, perhaps for the dramatic effect, where a drunken Nixon contacts Frost in the dead of night and discusses many character defects in vague detail, and although this event never actually happened, its pivotal for how the final interview plays out, and how Frost manages to have Nixon accept his guilt. In many ways the film certainly attempts to capture the essence of what went on during those interview days, but it also tries to make its own mark for the performances alone, which are the benchmark of the film, once these two sit face to face, thats when the magic occurs. Full Review »