Wellspring Media | Release Date: September 17, 2004
5.9
USER SCORE
Mixed or average reviews based on 14 Ratings
USER RATING DISTRIBUTION
Positive:
8
Mixed:
1
Negative:
5
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9
mosesl.Oct 10, 2005
One of the best of 2004, a tribute to the end of cinema and movie going before film became digital, and images on the screen and sounds behind the projector are essences of another time.
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0
BrandonP.Mar 1, 2007
This is not a film about the end of movies. This is the end of movies. This is a film where the director stops caring about his audience, in place of lazy pretentiousness. This is a case of a writer so confidant that critics will read deeply This is not a film about the end of movies. This is the end of movies. This is a film where the director stops caring about his audience, in place of lazy pretentiousness. This is a case of a writer so confidant that critics will read deeply into his film that he creates no actual meaning at all. This is the case of editors giving up on appropriate timing and rhythm so much so that it creates a visual representation of nails on a chalkboard. And if you really think a limping woman walking up stairs for an extended period of time is that funny, than you have a very dull sense of humor. Hollywood Expand
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0
MattJJun 24, 2009
Total crap.
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8
ChadS.Nov 8, 2005
It's an amusing gambit to make a movie about going to the movies when the film-within-the film is going to be of more interest to the average moviegoer...in Taiwan. An international festival audience, however, sits in admiration at how It's an amusing gambit to make a movie about going to the movies when the film-within-the film is going to be of more interest to the average moviegoer...in Taiwan. An international festival audience, however, sits in admiration at how Taiwanese cinema has matured since their pop-entertainment days of martial arts epic, without understanding that those days were halcyon. I suspect that Tsai Ming-liang's films are more popular abroad, as are the filmographies of Hou Hsiao-hsien and Edward Yang. Late in the film, two old men commiserate over how people don't attend the movies anymore, and "Goodbye Dragon Inn" is just the sort of film to keep them away. This film could be construed as a self-criticism of a formalist director's failure to enrich his own people's lives with stories they can relate to. It was the author Sherman Alexie who made me first aware that the high-end of non-white artists are not popular with their own people. Alexie, a Native-American, had said that "all of his ancestors were illiterate," and that his fanbase are largely white, middle-class women. The key to getting anything out of "Goodbye Dragon Inn" is to project yourself as one of the film's patrons. Don't be you, be them. Expand
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0
PandaDec 25, 2008
This movie makes no sense, there were a few funny moments but a complete waste of time nonetheless. Who stands in front of the urinal for 15 minutes and makes people watch that crap?
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