Little Otik Image
Metascore
74

Generally favorable reviews - based on 13 Critics What's this?

User Score
8.1

Universal acclaim- based on 9 Ratings

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  • Starring: ,
  • Summary: This film is based upon a classic fairy tale of an infertile couple who adopt a tree stump as their baby.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 10 out of 13
  2. Negative: 0 out of 13
  1. 90
    Magnificently twisted black comedy.
  2. 90
    A handmade dream, cobbled together from dirt, wood and more imagination than most of us can muster in our most fevered states. Because this Czech master refuses to work in the scrubbed, antiseptic manner of most animators, this fable comes to life as hilarious and creepy.
  3. 88
    Subversively funny, it's a welcome alternative to the big-budget movies flooding into theaters at this time of year.
  4. Reviewed by: Ken Fox
    80
    Wickedly funny, deeply disturbing, live-action retelling of an old Czech folktale.
  5. 78
    Should be required viewing for prospective parents still sitting on the spermatazoan fence; after all, you're going to need a good sense of humor, aren't you?
  6. Must be the smartest -- and most disturbing -- movie about parenthood in ages.
  7. Reviewed by: Deborah Young
    40
    An unsettling piece of filmmaking whose grimly vivid images are guaranteed to give impressionable viewers nightmares.

See all 13 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 6 out of 6
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 6
  3. Negative: 0 out of 6
  1. Joshc
    Apr 8, 2008
    10
    For Tolkien, fairy tales were not concerned with possibility so much as desirability: "If they awakened desire, satisfying it while often For Tolkien, fairy tales were not concerned with possibility so much as desirability: "If they awakened desire, satisfying it while often whetting it unbearably, they succeeded. . . . " In that sense, Jan Svankmajer's Little Otik is an even more authentic fairy story, dealing as it does with the yearning for what is impossible and a rebellion against the real. In his fourth feature, Svankmajer has transposed a grotesque Czech folktale about a childless couple who raise a tree stump as their baby to contemporary Prague. Filled with strollers, the city is likewise an incubator for fantasy. The storklike, uptight Karel (Jan Hartl) discovers babies inside melons and sees infants in the marketplace, fished from tanks, weighed, and wrapped in newspapers to go. To tease his pining wife, Bozena (Veronika Zilková), Karel uproots a tree stump and presents it to her. Bozena is totally accepting Expand
  2. ChadS.
    Aug 14, 2006
    7
    "Little Otik" loses steam when the little girl becomes the animated tree's caretaker. Not only does the film drag, it's also hard "Little Otik" loses steam when the little girl becomes the animated tree's caretaker. Not only does the film drag, it's also hard to buy a small child not being intimidated by an abomination against nature. Yes, it's a black comedy, but there has to be some rules. Also, we can already recognize that "Little Otik" is a fairy tale, so watching the girl read the story from an anthology in which her real world is imitating, perhaps, flaws this otherwise beguilling film with a little too much self-awareness. Expand

See all 6 User Reviews

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