Focus Features | Release Date: April 8, 2011
7.8
USER SCORE
Generally favorable reviews based on 408 Ratings
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310
Mixed:
69
Negative:
29
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5
ShiiraMay 12, 2011
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. The hunter pursues a caribou, no doubt bewildered by the size and sex of his attacker. The caribou will pay for underestimating his attacker. Hanna(Sairose Ronan) knows her way around a bow and arrow. But on this particular chase, the girl, uncharacteristically, is imprecise with her aim, so unusual for this Finlander, whom you suspect doesn't miss her mark often. It's not a kill shot, so the Arctic deer staggers away, bloodying the snow in a vain attempt at escaping from the conspicuously young archer. With no fight left in him, Hanna catches up to the wounded animal, who is still breathing, having nothing but a mercy killing to look forward to. Standing over the caribou, the words that tumble out of her mouth aren't what you'd expect. The words are barbed, without empathy; words that convey no regard for the vanquished animal. She taunts her prey, telling the deer, "I just missed your heart," before blowing him away to smithereens with two gunshot blasts. No communion exists between Hanna and the wildlife she hunts down; for example, this quadruped, because the girl is godless and incapable of feeling remorse, only triumph. Not being the least bit squeamish, Hanna makes an incision in the carcass and rips out its entrails, while the proud father(Eric Bana), the girl's handler, watches from afar, congratulating himself for his hand in creating this perfect monster; a cold, efficient killing machine. Kuusamo doesn't believe in tears. What's up with all these murderous little girls? Jaume Collet-Serra's "Orphan", anyone? It wasn't so long ago that such unladylike behavior would have been deemed unthinkable. As recently as 1991, there still existed a persistence of boundaries which precluded females(of all ages) with homicidal intentions from committing acts of violence considered too graphic. For instance, in Luc Besson's "La Femme Nikita", the government-trained assassin(played by Milla Jonovich) chooses not to shoot a dog, but instead, runs out of the room before she's finished with taking the necessary photographs to complete her mission. With each passing year, Nikita(renamed Josephine by the government) seems more and more demure. Nowadays, given the same situation, the dog would surely get it between the eyes, especially after Matthew Vaughn's taboo-breaking "Kick-Ass", in which the divide between both sexes, and more notably, the chronological age that differentiates children from adults, have all been but obliterated by the blood-drenched spectacle of Hit Girl's precociously sociopathic masculinity. Whereas the hyper-violent U.K. take on the superhero film portrays the grrrl-murderess stylings of Chloe Moretz as cute and adorable, "Hanna" treats the titular character's homicides a little more soberly, but like Mindy, the little girl who came in from the cold shares that same comportment of desensitization towards violence. Even worse, Hanna kills, on more than one occasion, what appears to be innocent CIA agents, most notably, the woman disguised as Marissa, whom the pint-sized assassin, soon after producing crocodile tears, cruelly dispatches of in mid-clinch, snapping the masquerading woman's neck with her bare hands. Unlike "Kick-Ass", whose facetious attempts at humanizing Hit Girl plays like comedy, Hanna' softer side, coaxed out of her by the vacationing family she meets while roaming the dry Moroccan terrain, is a genuine effort on the filmmaker's part of transforming this anti-hero into a sympathetic figure. However, there's no getting around the fact that Hanna is indeed a cold-blooded killer, capable of disposing the innocent and the guilty alike in equal measure, as evidenced by her plaintively stating the line on Marissa(Cate Blanchett) with the same dispassionate tone that she had used on the caribou in the film's waning moments. Hanna is absolutely inscrutable, practically a cipher for the film's sick fantasy. In the Besson follow-up "The Professional", Mathilde(played by a thirteen-year-old Natalie Portman), a hit girl wanna-be, asks her mentor Leon, "Can we use real bullets now?" after she shoots a random stranger from long-distance using a paint gun. Further along in the film, she walks into a building carrying a paper bag full of weapons with the intention of avenging the man who had killed her family, but alas, she never gets to use them. The audience just wasn't ready for such mayhem being performed by a child. Some of us still can't help but wince at the mere thought. Expand
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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6
Andy92May 21, 2011
there was a fair amount of action involved in this movie and there are parts were it slows down which is good. Saoirse Ronan provided a goo performance its just the story that let it down a bit it could have been alot better not many peoplethere was a fair amount of action involved in this movie and there are parts were it slows down which is good. Saoirse Ronan provided a goo performance its just the story that let it down a bit it could have been alot better not many people after seeing this movie could have walked out the cinema with a smile on their face Expand
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6
jeremypApr 9, 2011
Suspend disbelief all ye who enter here. But then you should've known that from the preview. Hanna is a wunderkind who Eric Bana has been grooming, seemingly to assasinate Cate Blanchett and then the two of them can live happily ever after.Suspend disbelief all ye who enter here. But then you should've known that from the preview. Hanna is a wunderkind who Eric Bana has been grooming, seemingly to assasinate Cate Blanchett and then the two of them can live happily ever after. No matter that Cate has no clue where they are, but I digress, and screw up plot fault. Once Cate has been kindly advised of her location she sends minions to kill her off. Yeah, as if. Little Hanna may look cute, but she's your worst nightmARYAN. Prolonged chase scenes ensue and Hanna has her little hands full dispatching off various and sundry villains, until, of course she comes face to face with Ms. Bete Noir, or in this case Bete Rouge. Can't wait for the sequel to be called :"Little Hanna grows up and develops social skills." Expand
2 of 5 users found this helpful23
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5
nutterjrMay 22, 2012
Saoirse Ronan gave a chilling performance that overshadowed Bana and Blanchett proving that she is a great talent, the story seemed to muddled and the audience is left with a so what feeling in the end.
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6
FiresideApr 25, 2011
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. So there are some interesting set designs and the occasional scene that somehow transcends the quality of the rest of the film (particularly the interogation sequence of the family half-way through the film), and although it seems to be billed as an action movie it is quite sparse set pieces, some of which are poorly executed and nonsensical (why is she always running if she is so tough). Overall the movie is less than the sum of its parts primarily due to what I feel is bad screen writing: besides it not being all the interesting or dense, the end of the film seems confused about exactly what it's trying to accomplish. But what bothered me the most are the inconsistencies concerning the 'badd-assery' of Hanna and the Eric Bana character. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
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6
TVJerryApr 14, 2011
A teenage girl (Saoirse Ronan) has been trained by her deep-cover-agent father to be a super soldier. She spends most of the movie running from bad guys (including Cate Blanchett with an indeterminable accent). There are some amusing moments,A teenage girl (Saoirse Ronan) has been trained by her deep-cover-agent father to be a super soldier. She spends most of the movie running from bad guys (including Cate Blanchett with an indeterminable accent). There are some amusing moments, but most of the movie is about overlit or edgy locations, choppy editing and a cool techno soundtrack. The narrative holds lots of promise, but once it unfolds, it's a letdown. Overall, it's all about style over substance. Expand
1 of 3 users found this helpful12
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6
jediboyJun 17, 2011
Saoirse Ronan & Eric Bana breath life into this Bourne-style espionage thriller. Starts off well, with a Blade-like feel to it, but quickly loses its impetus as Hanna mixes with kids her own age, stows away with a family and goes through theSaoirse Ronan & Eric Bana breath life into this Bourne-style espionage thriller. Starts off well, with a Blade-like feel to it, but quickly loses its impetus as Hanna mixes with kids her own age, stows away with a family and goes through the Star Wars cliche of Mother and Father issues.

In the end, I think the director took his foot off the gas, or didn't have the budget to keep the adrenaline flowing.

Could have been so much better, but in the end not horrible.

Oh, and its got a Chemical Brothers soundtrack, which helps.
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6
DKayApr 13, 2011
Shockingly predictable but fun... For a while. Once the mysteries are revealed, uhh not much left to care about. I counted 6 chases before sighing, so theres that. Blanchett and bana and hanna and the story are all interesting for about 2/3,Shockingly predictable but fun... For a while. Once the mysteries are revealed, uhh not much left to care about. I counted 6 chases before sighing, so theres that. Blanchett and bana and hanna and the story are all interesting for about 2/3, but wright's chem bros music video ploy tires and the climax is more fiiinally than thrilling. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
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6
PurpleUrpNov 15, 2011
A twisty tale but worth the watch with its tangling plot and creative action sequences. Hanna might be a worthy character in a fighting game as she is fully capable of opening a can of A while making it look easy.
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4
NDiggyApr 12, 2011
Boring from start to finish. Not horrible, but not worth paying to see in theaters. No idea how this got rated so highly by critics. Eric Bana is underused, the story is pretty clichéd as are the characters (seriously, aBoring from start to finish. Not horrible, but not worth paying to see in theaters. No idea how this got rated so highly by critics. Eric Bana is underused, the story is pretty clichéd as are the characters (seriously, a bleach blond east german thats into torture and kinky sex). Expand
2 of 6 users found this helpful24
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6
rotkuMar 11, 2012
Not quite Leon or The Assassin but a good movie and a great performance by Saoirse Ronan. Eric Bana could have been developed into a more impacting role and the family was either very strange or my concept of sanity is very misdirected butNot quite Leon or The Assassin but a good movie and a great performance by Saoirse Ronan. Eric Bana could have been developed into a more impacting role and the family was either very strange or my concept of sanity is very misdirected but it's an entertaining movie if you can put the holes in the plot out of your mind. Expand
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6
KAS--WillSep 10, 2011
Kind of a boring film about a trained assassin girl. Being a fan of the anime series "Gunslinger Girl" I don't get offended by little girls, especially fictional ones get hurt (to some degree) and find it pretty cool and entertaining.Kind of a boring film about a trained assassin girl. Being a fan of the anime series "Gunslinger Girl" I don't get offended by little girls, especially fictional ones get hurt (to some degree) and find it pretty cool and entertaining. However, this movie failed to be either of those 2. Instead it was fairly slow, and fairly entertaining. All of the characters are forgettable, and in the end I was like with a, "Wait... what was the point of watching this?" expression. Expand
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4
WAengusJun 4, 2011
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. For those who enjoy this kind of thing, it begins promisingly. In the snowy Finnish wilderness, Hanna (Saoirse Ronan), delicate-faced but deathly as a Valkyrie, brings down a caribou with her bow and arrow. As she bends to her kill, a male voice behind her says: 'You're dead.' Unsurprisingly, this pronouncement is meant hypothetically. Her father, Erik (Eric Bana), is determined to keep his daughter on her toes by ambushing her at any opportunity (like Kato Fong in The Pink Panther). After a brief, martial artsy exchange, he leaves her lying in the snow, telling her she can bring back the caribou herself. As she eviscerates the animal, we begin to see one possible reason for this beautiful location; blood and intestines are so much more striking when shot against snow. As if to emphasise this, the scene closes with an aerial zoom-out of Hanna on her back, exhausted, lying against the gutted carcass. To begin with the plot is laughably absurd: rogue CIA agent Erik raises his daughter in a Grimm's fairytale cabin in the wilderness in order to groom her to kill CIA boss Marissa (Cate Blanchette) who killed his wife. This aside, the film has a whole slew of inconsistencies. One of the most glaring is Erik's failure, despite his intensive education programme, to introduce his daughter to some of the most basic aspects of city life, such as TV and, em, electricity. Another weirdness is that at the start of the film Hanna is well-trained in the lethal arts, taking out a number of the special forces unit that arrives to capture her (again inconsistently, since being captured is her objective); later, at the secret base where she'd held, she kills a few more guys, including the hapless woman who is sent in to interrogate her. All well and good, I suppose, but later in the film, while she's on the run through various countries, her super-powered inner assassin all but abandons her, culminating in a comically ridiculous scene that has her being chased by campy hit man Isaacs (Tom Hollander) and his dorky looking skinhead side-kicks.

This is comic-strip territory of course. When you enter the cinema (or buy a DVD) to view such a flick you are in effect paying for an invisible string attached to an invisible hot air balloon attached (hopefully) to your disbelief. However, after some initial tugging, mine stubbornly refused to lift. Give me Guillermo del Toro's Hellboy any day Saoirse Ronan has been justifiably praised for her acting (the directing is the problem) and Eric Bana is believable enough. Cate Blanchette as Marissa (or the White Witch) is pretty dire; she goes through the motions, not that she's allowed that many, coming across as a mannikin with a frozen smile. Like many other critics, Philip French has likened Hanna to Jason Bourne. Writing in The Observer, he concludes that 'the overall effect is polished, weightless and forgettable.' Weightless and forgettable maybe, but 'polished' suggests to me a rather different kind of film, one in which the clunky working parts are kept firmly below the bonnet. The Bourne series achieves this with some distinction, managing to be both weightless and memorable. Compared to those films, Hanna is a bone-shaker with pretensions, a risible mess.
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4
filmtrashreviewJun 8, 2011
The only thing this movie did was waste a hour and a half of my life. The filmmakers try to play with the governmental twists and turns of a modern day thriller but fail greatly. For the first hour and twenty minutes the film explainedThe only thing this movie did was waste a hour and a half of my life. The filmmakers try to play with the governmental twists and turns of a modern day thriller but fail greatly. For the first hour and twenty minutes the film explained nothing and by the time the big payoff came, I just didn't care anymore. Expand
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5
dariazzoJul 7, 2011
Good movie, it reminds of Tarantino for the character style and some of Hanna's dialogues. The three germans are amazingly out of context, for the joy of all B-movie fans. Technically, the action sequences, with a lot to share with musicGood movie, it reminds of Tarantino for the character style and some of Hanna's dialogues. The three germans are amazingly out of context, for the joy of all B-movie fans. Technically, the action sequences, with a lot to share with music videoclips, are beautifully realised, but after a while they become repetitive, setting the viewer far away from the plot. This spoils the final where most of the underlying story is revealed. It's a pity, because with more balance and a deeper trip into Hanna's mind, the movie would have been a really good one. Come back next time.. Expand
1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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6
harlthegr8Jun 17, 2011
While it was definitely not what I was expecting, Hanna was an enjoyable movie. I would have liked to see much more of Hanna's skills be put to the test, and the antagonist was extremely unfitting. The ending was unclimactic but there were aWhile it was definitely not what I was expecting, Hanna was an enjoyable movie. I would have liked to see much more of Hanna's skills be put to the test, and the antagonist was extremely unfitting. The ending was unclimactic but there were a few shimmers of a good movie that shined through. The soundtrack was epic and I thought Eric Bana did a fairly good job as Hanna's "father". Unfortunately, the plot was pretty confusing, the enemies were very odd and several events did not make sense (she could figure out how to use a computer but not turn off a ceiling fan?). I would say it is worth a watch, but definitely not one to buy for your home collection. Expand
1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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5
TheMudDoctorSep 12, 2011
What happened to Joe Wright? The British auteur was, at one time, an extremely exciting new prospect who seemed poised to take the film world by storm. In 2005, he dazzled critics and audiences with his charming adaptation of Jane Austenâ
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6
grandpajoe6191Sep 7, 2011
The movie may outsmart itself or be too in some situations, but either than that the movie was strong with symbolical scenes and a story similar to a fairy tale. Also the soundtrack, recorded by the Chemical Brothers, also provided a coolThe movie may outsmart itself or be too in some situations, but either than that the movie was strong with symbolical scenes and a story similar to a fairy tale. Also the soundtrack, recorded by the Chemical Brothers, also provided a cool atmosphere to the movie's background. Though do not expect amazing action or a shocking ending; "Hanna" has neither of it. Expand
3 of 4 users found this helpful31
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5
SpangleJan 5, 2017
Part fairy tale, part coming of age film, part road film, part revenge thriller, part fish out of water, part spy thriller, and part superhero origin, Hanna suffers from having too many parts and influences. Divulging in all of them withPart fairy tale, part coming of age film, part road film, part revenge thriller, part fish out of water, part spy thriller, and part superhero origin, Hanna suffers from having too many parts and influences. Divulging in all of them with fairy tale references around every corner, a girl learning who she is and growing up, a girl traveling, a girl hunting the woman who killed her parents, a girl adjusting to a new environment, a CIA agent hunting a rogue CIA agent, and a supergirl coming to terms with her abilities, this movie is an absolute mess. Tonally uneven and all over the place plotwise, the final product is an amalgamation of so many different influences, director Joe Wright struggles to keep them together and have them be coherent. Even when they are coherent, they are so obvious and hamfisted, the film fails to be enjoyable. Fortunately, stylish editing, action scenes, and cinematography elevate the film to be a visual feast, but its story is so weak and obvious, it is hard to focus on the beauty.

One of the major elements that caused me great strain was the ending, which is a book end of the beginning. In the beginning, we see Hanna (Saoirse Ronan) hunt and kill a moose. However, her arrow narrowly misses its heart so she has to chase it down and shoot it in the head. This same sequence occurs again at the end, except it is no longer a moose. I joked to myself that the film was going to have say the same lines in the beginning when the sequence began and then it actually did. I was already struggling to enjoy the film at this point, but this obvious and predictable conclusion really bothered me and cemented this as nothing but an average film. This trend obviousness continues with ever present fairy tale references such as Marissa Wiegler (Cate Blanchett), the evil witch and CIA agent, walking out of a wolf's head in an abandoned amusement park. A man who helps Hanna is most certainly out of Alice in Wonderland with mushrooms adorned his home and a bubbly personality, as well as a flower on his shirt. In moments such as these, it feels as though Wright had just binge watched a series of fairy tales and decided it was time to copy them all to one film. By the end of the film, it feels like a hollow mishmash of references, rather than a film.

These contrivance and cliches continue as the film borrows from all the genres it pretends to try and be. From a girl experiencing a lesbian encounter (it is unspoken, but it no doubt is), learning about her past, and facing challenges (except the challenges here are murderers) to her father being a rogue CIA agent with a superhuman kid that he tries to protect from those who wish to exploit her, Hanna is very cliched. It disguises this by using so many cliches and typical premises and then combining them into one, which allows the film to appear original. Unfortunately, it is anything but with each beat being incredibly predictable and telegraphed. Though Hanna is a capable fighter with punches coming from every direction, Wright shows that he is only capable of slow and obvious punches to the face. Once you start blocking these punches, he has no idea where to go.

One of the reasons why this film may have left me feeling so cold is the dreamlike atmosphere. I often love dreamlike atmospheres such as that in Drive (which has also been called a fairy tale), but films such as Drive become surreal. There are moments where the director winks at you and lets you know it is a fairy tale. Wright does not do this. He wants to have his cake and eat it too with a dreamlike atmosphere and a gritty and realistic film. This leaves the film feeling tonally jumbled even before we begin seeing the cliches and various genres the film wants to operate within.

The film does elevate itself a bit though with great acting. Saoirse Ronan is a brilliant actress as she has shown in films such as Atonement, The Grand Budapest Hotel, and Brooklyn. Hanna joins those films in showcasing her tremendous ability. Playing a cold and calculating super soldier in this film, Ronan is steely throughout and, yet, in little flashes exposes her youth and humanity. Simply a young girl dealt an impossible hand, Hanna is incredibly sympathetic, even if she is so violent and brutal. Ronan captures this incredibly well. As the evil witch, Cate Blanchett is brilliant as always. If she ever turned in a bad performance, it would be noteworthy because she has never not wowed me in a role. This film is no exception. Eric Bana is largely ineffectual with him merely channeling Arnold Schwarzenegger with his accent. I kept waiting for him to yell "get to the choppa'" with the way he was speaking.

A tonally jumbled, uneven, and hamfisted story about a girl who must overcome the forces of evil to enter adulthood, the film tackles so many elements it is hard to enjoy. Though its action set pieces and cinematography have moments of brilliance, Joe Wright is simply not talented enough to pull this off.
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4
sunshine525Nov 27, 2012
Basic flaw in premise: Hanna must either kill someone or be killed by her. When she is ready for the challenge, she presses a button to begin the games. Wouldn't it have been wiser NOT to let her opponent know she was coming? She hadn't beenBasic flaw in premise: Hanna must either kill someone or be killed by her. When she is ready for the challenge, she presses a button to begin the games. Wouldn't it have been wiser NOT to let her opponent know she was coming? She hadn't been seen since babyhood . They weren''t expecting her had no idea what she looked like. She could have returned to the world and lived in it undetected, choosing her moment to engage in battle or not choosing to be a warrior.. Her father seemed not to tell her (or the audience) enough to evaluate other options. It is also not clear what the father had to gain from the assassination Hanna was instructed to perpetrate- Expand
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6
madnut666Feb 19, 2016
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. The movie has a compelling idea and an interesting beginning, but then by the middle of the movie it stops going anywhere. They start with a woman super soldier hero which is new and refreshing but then with all her survival skills and abilities to kill a man in a second with her bare hands she spends most of the movie running away like a scared little school girl. It feels like a lot of buildup with no gratification, like someone had an idea but forgot to write story around it. Expand
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6
MovieMasterEddyApr 3, 2016
Sixteen, but not so sweet.

Talk about the dangers of home schooling. The mesmerizing heroine of “Hanna” — a semi-feral 16-year-old raised by her stay-at-home dad in the permafrost forests of Finland — can rattle off facts and figures about
Sixteen, but not so sweet.

Talk about the dangers of home schooling. The mesmerizing heroine of “Hanna” — a semi-feral 16-year-old raised by her stay-at-home dad in the permafrost forests of Finland — can rattle off facts and figures about anatomy and geography in seven languages, but she’s also a ruthless killing machine. To be fair, it’s not all her father’s fault, in this intense but imperfect thriller from director Joe Wright.

The single most compelling reason to see “Hanna” is Hanna herself. As played by Saoirse Ronan, who made her first big splash as another morally challenged youngster in Wright’s 2007 “Atonement,” the character is a fascinating and frustrating cipher. Trained in hand-to-hand combat, survival skills, evasive maneuvers and gun handling, she drives the movie forward with a watchability that’s as compulsive as it is propulsive. She’s so diverting that it’s easy to overlook the movie’s flaws.

There are more than a few, starting with the switch Hanna flips — quite literally — to start the action rolling. One minute she and her father Erik (Eric Bana) are bow-hunting caribou and engaging in mixed martial arts play in the snow, and the next Hanna has activated some kind of electronic homing beacon that tells the movie’s bad girl, Marissa Wiegler (a gloriously over-the-top Cate Blanchett), just where to find them. And when I say “find them,” I mean “chopper in with a SWAT team and try to kill them.”

Why, exactly, does Hanna do that when, as her father points out, they have all they need right there? Hanna knows that Marissa — an equally ruthless agent of some unnamed CIA-like U.S. government agency — will descend on her, stopping only when one or the other of them is dead. That’s the first thing Erik taught his daughter.

In the meantime, however, Wright has come up with one heck of an excuse to go to the multiplex. In short order, “Hanna” turns into a classic popcorn movie, subclassification: chase flick. Eat with one hand, because you’ll need the other to hang on to your seat, as the film lunges from Finland to Morocco to Spain to Germany, where Erik and his daughter have agreed to rendezvous. The cinematography is eye-popping, culminating in a surreal sequence set in a derelict Berlin amusement park.

Who exactly is Hanna? And why does Marissa want her so badly? Those are just a couple of the film’s many mysteries, which writers Seth Lochhead and David Farr unravel at just the right pace. There’s also some welcome comic relief, courtesy of an English family on holiday that Hanna hitches a ride with. Jessica Barden (so wonderful in “Tamara Drewe”) is a treat as the family’s smart-mouthed teenage daughter and, briefly, Hanna’s first real friend.

One mystery the film doesn’t handle so well: Why should we care? Ronan makes about as much of Hanna as she can, given the character’s strange heartlessness. But there’s a troubling emptiness at the center of the movie, too. For a while at least, the best thing about it isn’t Marissa’s globetrotting hunt for Hanna, but Hanna’s search for herself.

Is it a great movie? No. Nagging questions and plot holes start appearing the minute the endorphins and adrenaline wear off.

But it isn’t a bad one, either. At one point, someone asks Marissa — who has a compelling reason to care what kind of person Hanna turns into — whether the girl we see in the movie turned out like Marissa had hoped. “Better,” she says icily.

In balance, I’d agree.
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