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75

Generally favorable reviews - based on 11 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction is an impressionistic portrait of the iconic actor comprised of intimate moments, film clips from some of his 250 films and his own heart-breaking renditions of American folk songs. The film explores the actor's enigmatic outlook on his life, his unexploited talents as a musician, and includes candid reminiscences by David Lynch, Wim Wenders, Sam Shepard, Kris Kristofferson and Debbie Harry. Collapse
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 9 out of 11
  2. Negative: 0 out of 11
  1. Reviewed by: Jeannette Catsoulis
    Sep 10, 2013
    90
    Matching her subject’s lackadaisical rhythms, Ms. Huber has shaped an unusually poetic biopic.
  2. Reviewed by: Nick Schager
    Sep 10, 2013
    90
    A film that's in perfect sync with its subject.
  3. Reviewed by: Marc Savlov
    Sep 25, 2013
    89
    Alternating between color footage and the genius interplay of startlingly lovely sequences of Stanton singing and playing harmonica in granular black-and-white, Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction perfectly captures the essence of the man.
  4. Reviewed by: Ty Burr
    Oct 3, 2013
    75
    Through luck or Huber’s eye for the odd detail, it adds up to an unexpectedly moving portrait of a maverick at twilight.
  5. Reviewed by: Noel Murray
    Sep 10, 2013
    70
    It’s a little frustrating at first to realize that Huber isn’t going to get much explanation of anything from Stanton. But she ends up making a virtue of the actor’s Zen calm.
  6. Reviewed by: Peter Rainer
    Sep 13, 2013
    67
    It’s a truism, reinforced here, that actors often are the last to comprehend how they do what they do. No matter. What they give us is all that counts.
  7. Reviewed by: Chris Cabin
    Sep 9, 2013
    50
    Though occasionally aesthetically alluring and evocative, feels like an introductory chapter to a more substantive, sprawling study of the actor.

See all 11 Critic Reviews

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