Hey, Boo: Harper Lee and 'To Kill a Mockingbird' Image
Metascore
64

Generally favorable reviews - based on 13 Critics What's this?

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8.2

Universal acclaim- based on 6 Ratings

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  • Summary: Fifty years after winning the Pulitzer Prize, To Kill a Mockingbird remains a beloved bestseller and quite possibly the most influential American novel of the 20th Century. Nearly one million copies are sold each year and the novel has been translated into more than forty languagesFifty years after winning the Pulitzer Prize, To Kill a Mockingbird remains a beloved bestseller and quite possibly the most influential American novel of the 20th Century. Nearly one million copies are sold each year and the novel has been translated into more than forty languages worldwide. The film version, starring Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch, won a trio of Academy Awards, and the U.S. Postal Service's new stamp honoring Peck depicts him wearing glasses, as Finch. Behind it all was a young Southern girl named Nelle Harper Lee, who once said that she wanted to be South Alabama's Jane Austen. Hey, Boo explores Lee's life and unravels some of the mysteries surrounding her, including why she never published again. Containing never-before-seen photos and letters and an exclusive interview with Lee’s sister, Alice Finch Lee, the film also brings to light the context and history of the novel's Deep South setting and the social changes it inspired after publication. (First Run Features) Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 9 out of 13
  2. Negative: 0 out of 13
  1. Reviewed by: Owen Gleiberman
    May 27, 2011
    83
    Harper Lee hasn't been interviewed in 47 years, but this meditation on her only novel, "To Kill a Mockingbird," puts you inside her skin.
  2. Reviewed by: Peter Rainer
    May 21, 2011
    83
    It would have been wonderful if Lee had consented to an interview for this documentary, but at least we have, among many others, her 99-year-old sister Alice, until recently a practicing lawyer in their hometown of Monroeville, Ala.
  3. Reviewed by: Kenneth Turan
    May 14, 2011
    80
    Though it's more than a little awestruck and feels padded even at 82 minutes, the story it tells remains completely fascinating
  4. Reviewed by: Neil Genzlinger
    May 12, 2011
    70
    Eventually, though, Hey, Boo settles into a pleasant rhythm. It gives the fascinating history of how the book came to be.
  5. Reviewed by: Frank Scheck
    May 14, 2011
    70
    Occasionally borders on hagiography, but it nonetheless provides wonderful insights into the book's social and literary importance as well as its author's personality.
  6. Reviewed by: Mark Feeney
    Jun 1, 2011
    63
    Hey, Boo is the documentary equivalent of a group hug, right down to the segments showing middle schoolers in Westchester County, N.Y., and Birmingham, Ala., discussing the book in class.
  7. Reviewed by: Mark Holcomb
    May 10, 2011
    40
    The overall effect is flattering but shallow, making Murphy's movie the last thing Mockingbird needs-another toothless encomium. No wonder Lee dodges the limelight.

See all 13 Critic Reviews

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