Metascore
30

Generally unfavorable reviews - based on 20 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 0 out of 20
  2. Negative: 11 out of 20
  1. Reviewed by: Michael O'Sullivan
    Jan 30, 2014
    50
    If it touches on notions of scientific arrogance and the question of what makes us human, it ultimately does so lightly, and with a mix of eye-popping action and loopy good humor.
  2. Reviewed by: Richard Corliss
    Jan 27, 2014
    50
    Ambitious of vision and swooping of camera, I, Frankenstein is no "I, Robot," let alone "I, Claudius," but it’s definitely watchable on a cold Jan. evening or, a few months from now, on your I, Pad.
  3. Reviewed by: David Hiltbrand
    Jan 26, 2014
    50
    With no clear idea how to end the movie, which has come to resemble an excessive episode of Buffy, the Vampire Slayer, writer/director Stuart Beattie (G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra) uses an old but still effective Hollywood trick: He blows up everything on the screen to smithereens.
  4. Reviewed by: Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Jan 24, 2014
    50
    If the film is made with the understanding that campiness needs to be straight-faced to be funny, then are its “unintentional” laughs really that unintentional?
  5. Reviewed by: Clark Collis
    Jan 24, 2014
    50
    To be fair, Eckhart is physically impressive and Bill Nighy and his raised eyebrow do their best in the role of demon leader Naberius. But I, Frankenstein shares something else with it's monster-hero, something much worse than its patchwork nature: The film is distinctly lacking in the soul department.
  6. Reviewed by: Marc Savlov
    Jan 29, 2014
    40
    I, Frankenstein is nowhere near as garishly, ghoulishly awful as "Van Helsing," Universal’s last attempt to resurrect its classic monsters. It’s a grimly fiendish slog nonetheless, and hardly worth getting up out of the grave for.
  7. Reviewed by: Nicolas Rapold
    Jan 24, 2014
    40
    Having established a downbeat, even stoically plain tone, this economical affair feels like a canvas prepped for, and awaiting, further detail (or straight-to-video-on-demand sequels).
  8. Reviewed by: Tasha Robinson
    Jan 24, 2014
    40
    While it’s nothing new and lacks individualistic touches, it’s still solid trashy fun as an overwrought superhero origin story.
  9. Reviewed by: Elizabeth Weitzman
    Jan 24, 2014
    40
    At the very least, it does provide an easy excuse to sit in a heated room eating popcorn.
  10. Reviewed by: Tom Russo
    Jan 26, 2014
    38
    Eckhart doesn’t really do any of that classic grunting as Frankenstein 2.0, but maybe he should have.
  11. Reviewed by: James Berardinelli
    Jan 24, 2014
    38
    Sadly, as apt as comparisons to "Underworld" might seem, I, Frankenstein can't even clear that very low bar.
  12. Reviewed by: Bill Goodykoontz
    Jan 24, 2014
    30
    By far the scariest thing about director Stuart Beattie’s I, Frankenstein, a terrible would-be horror story that somehow roped in a couple of really good actors, is that the ending seems to suggest the possibility of a sequel. Now that’s horror.
  13. 30
    Eckhart plays Frankenstein’s monster in a monotonous, teeth-gritting mode, as if someone had one gun on him and another on his family.
  14. Reviewed by: Frank Scheck
    Jan 24, 2014
    30
    Director/screenwriter Stuart Beattie, adapting the graphic novel by Kevin Grevioux, employs a strictly humorless, gothic approach to the material that makes one long for the satirical touches of James Whale, let alone Mel Brooks.
  15. Reviewed by: Alan Scherstuhl
    Jan 24, 2014
    30
    It doesn't come close to working, but it's sweet that they tried.
  16. Reviewed by: Glenn Kenny
    Jan 24, 2014
    25
    A grievously ill-advised motion picture on every level.
  17. 25
    The humorless, generic, and chatty Frankenstein served up here makes you wonder if the good doctor, in all his patching-together of parts, didn’t forget the brains.
  18. Reviewed by: Robert Abele
    Jan 24, 2014
    20
    There's certainly no moviegoing reanimation in director Stuart Beattie's adaptation of Kevin Grevioux's graphic novel.
  19. Reviewed by: Andrew Barker
    Jan 24, 2014
    10
    Utterly witless, listless, sparkless and senseless, this supernatural actioner makes one long for the comparative sophistication of the conceptually identical “Underworld” franchise (with which it shares producers and a writer).
  20. Reviewed by: Drew Taylor
    Jan 26, 2014
    0
    This movie is a corpse in desperate need of reanimation.
User Score
4.3

Mixed or average reviews- based on 171 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 21 out of 55
  2. Negative: 27 out of 55
  1. Jan 24, 2014
    0
    This Movie was awful, if your looking for a movie that makes you puke due to low quality, badly scripted and poorly acted that was made purely to make money you just found the perfect movie. Full Review »
  2. Jan 24, 2014
    1
    This is one of those movies that don' t deserve to "live" in theaters. Lead actor, Aaron Eckhart is disaster ( my opinion) pale acting, lame CGI in one word complete garbage. Not worth watching. Full Review »
  3. Jan 24, 2014
    3
    But what’s most frustrating is that the film never attempts to explore, exploit, or elaborate on Adam’s origins in the Frankenstein story, to the extent that it’s easy to occasionally forget the film’s entire premise while watching it. (In fact, Eckhart himself disappears from the proceedings with surprising regularity, spending a good bit of time skulking around in the shadows, listening in on various supporting characters as they spout expository dialogue.) The film is also entirely devoid of humor, and so drably chaste that one can’t help but perk up at the slight glimmer of lust in Terra’s eye when she gets a look at the shirtless Adam’s stacked, stitched musculature in a low-lit bedroom. Alas, the size of this particular monster’s schwanzstucker goes totally unexplored. Director Beattie keeps his camera in constant motion throughout, though it’s sometimes unclear what effect he’s trying to produce. The relentlessly obtrusive score is matched in volume by the sound editing, which renders the rustling of clothes and the turning of pages in a book with floor-quaking resonance. The sets and other production design elements, however, are quite nice to look at when the camera holds still for long enough. Full Review »