Metascore
68

Generally favorable reviews - based on 24 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 20 out of 24
  2. Negative: 1 out of 24
  1. Reviewed by: Katie Walsh
    Oct 1, 2013
    91
    That a documentary about economics could be so personally emotional and affecting is remarkable. And to learn from Reich in this film, as his students at Berkeley do, is a treat and a privilege.
  2. Reviewed by: Susan Wloszczyna
    Sep 27, 2013
    88
    Wisely, Kornbluth strives to put a human face on the situation, focusing on several families who represent hard-working citizens who are barely making ends meet with their shrinking paychecks—let alone building up any savings.
  3. Reviewed by: Bruce Ingram
    Sep 26, 2013
    88
    Reich is a more lively speaker than Al Gore, however, frequently working jokes about his sub-five-foot height (his growth having been disrupted by a genetic disorder) into his presentation, and many of the film’s statistical interludes have been entertainingly animated as insurance against eyeball-glazing.
  4. Reviewed by: Peter Rainer
    Sep 27, 2013
    83
    It’s unseemly, I know, to praise a movie like this for the stand-up-comic affability of its host. But Reich’s engagingness also gives credence to the seriousness of his message. He’s all about fairness, and, in his demeanor, as well as in his presentation, he embodies that ideal.
  5. Reviewed by: Kenneth Turan
    Sep 26, 2013
    80
    Reich and documentary director Jacob Kornbluth turn out to be the ideal collaborators to tell the story of what that gap is, why it happened and why it's important, all in a totally engaging way.
  6. Reviewed by: Kerry Lengel
    Sep 26, 2013
    80
    An engaging film that’s head and shoulders above the average talking-head parade.
  7. Reviewed by: Joe Neumaier
    Sep 26, 2013
    80
    The wonkiness is at a minimum and Reich delivers it with tales from his own life, since he’s the son of a dress store owner and a mom who helped in the shop. Essential viewing, no matter how you cut it.
  8. Reviewed by: Scott Bowles
    Sep 30, 2013
    75
    While not as revelatory as Al Gore's 2006 Oscar-winning documentary, Inequality makes a resounding case that the middle class is facing its own planetary crisis: becoming an endangered species.
  9. Reviewed by: John DeFore
    Sep 27, 2013
    75
    The job is not to convince us of something many Americans don’t want to believe, but to address something we all know is happening and nail down just how bad it really is. Judging from the pit left in a viewer’s stomach, it does the job pretty well.
  10. Reviewed by: Mick LaSalle
    Sep 26, 2013
    75
    The fortunate thing about for Inequality for All is that, for all its good information and useful insight, it also has an appealing person at its center: Robert Reich, the economics expert and Berkeley professor who was also the labor secretary under Bill Clinton.
  11. Reviewed by: Nicolas Rapold
    Sep 26, 2013
    70
    Mr. Reich ties together his talking points with a reasonable-sounding analysis and an unassuming warmth sometimes absent from documentaries charting America’s economic woes.
  12. Reviewed by: Joe Morgenstern
    Sep 26, 2013
    70
    Jacob Kornbluth's lively documentary is both a polemic and a teaching tool.
  13. Reviewed by: Pete Vonder Haar
    Sep 24, 2013
    70
    The testimonials from a few of these people, with the realization they speak for tens of thousands, reinforces Inequality for All's sobering message while at the same time undercutting Reich's optimism.
  14. Reviewed by: Sheri Linden
    Sep 20, 2013
    70
    Policy wonk Robert Reich’s analysis of today’s parallels to the Great Depression is both statistics-driven and impassioned.
  15. Reviewed by: Andrew Barker
    Sep 20, 2013
    70
    Covering a broad swath of liberal economic theory in brisk, simply stated fashion, Inequality for All aims to do for income disparity what “An Inconvenient Truth” did for climate change.
  16. Reviewed by: Marjorie Baumgarten
    Oct 2, 2013
    67
    Inequality for All creates a framework in which all this heavy material is easily digestible, and refashions Reich, the policy wonk, into an inspirational figure who argues that “history is on the side of positive social change.”
  17. Reviewed by: A.A. Dowd
    Sep 25, 2013
    67
    As a primer on its topic, Inequality For All is informative, plainly argued, and — in some of its more poignant anecdotes — suitably enraging.
  18. Reviewed by: Simon Houpt
    Oct 31, 2013
    63
    The film doesn’t feel like homework. Still, while its description of the problem is convincing, you wish it could offer more of a prescription.
  19. Reviewed by: Peter Keough
    Sep 26, 2013
    63
    Another problem with “Inequality” is that it offers nothing new or surprising.
  20. Reviewed by: Kalvin Henely
    Sep 26, 2013
    63
    Robert Reich's message to America, much like director Jacob Kornbluth's uncomplicated film, is so simple and straightforward (you might even say obvious) that, without nitpicking, it can appear flawless.
  21. Reviewed by: Sam Adams
    Sep 24, 2013
    60
    Fortunately, Reich, who was Bill Clinton’s first-term Secretary of Labor, is an unflaggingly engaging speaker, and his class has higher production values than most independent films. (He has walk-off music. Walk-off music!)
  22. Reviewed by: Mark Jenkins
    Sep 27, 2013
    50
    Reich has a good sense of humor, as is virtually required of an adult who's less than 5 feet tall — he has Fairbanks disease, the same condition that accounts for Danny DeVito's stature — so he's pretty much guaranteed a laugh when he hops to his feet and asks if he looks like an advocate of "big government."
  23. Reviewed by: Keith Phipps
    Sep 26, 2013
    50
    An advocacy doc constructed to make a clear political point first and function as a film a distant second.
  24. Reviewed by: Kyle Smith
    Sep 30, 2013
    38
    A cinematic listicle of misleading economic talking points.
User Score
8.7

Universal acclaim- based on 17 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 5
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 5
  3. Negative: 1 out of 5
  1. Oct 24, 2013
    9
    Rattoo may have thought this film was propaganda, but it's hard to argue with the many facts that Reich presents. When 400 people in the US control as much wealth as the 150,000,000 poorest US residents, we have an issue of inequality that's at least worth discussing. And Reich makes it clear how government has contributed to inequality by tilting the field in favor of the well-off.

    My main criticism is that Reich showed a lot of correlation and inferred causality from it. In some cases he made a case for causality, but in too many cases he did not. Still it's a film worth seeing; you can form your own opinion whether inequality in the US represents a problem or not and, if so, what we should do about it.
    Full Review »
  2. Oct 12, 2013
    10
    I saw this movie with 3 friends. We had expected it to be informative, but a bit of a downer. What we did find was a surprise. It was very informative, historical, inspirational and a great lesson in basic global economics. Robert Reich does a wonderful job in this film presenting all of this with hard data from reliable sources. This is a must see film for everyone in the 99% and the 1%. Full Review »
  3. Dec 24, 2013
    10
    This a pretty informative film that I would recommend for both fans of Reich and those who are unaware of his work alike. The only downside is that the movie may not be as informative for those that follow Reich closely. It's still worth watching if only to support the spread of what some might call the economics of decency. I have to question the Ratoo's of the world who seem to have a hard time discerning who it is that is living in the reality based community. My best guess is that he may be one of those hyper-partisans who goes around giving 0 to the films he ideologically opposes, possibly for pay, but I imagine the forces that are afraid that widely based prosperity may start to come back can rabble rouse enough folks into doing it for free. Full Review »