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Metascore
67

Generally favorable reviews - based on 10 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: In the early 1960’s, alongside Andy Warhol, the Kuchar brothers shaped the New York underground film scene. Known as the “8mm Mozarts”, their films were noticeably different than other underground films of the time. They were wildly funny, but also human and vulnerable. Their films haveIn the early 1960’s, alongside Andy Warhol, the Kuchar brothers shaped the New York underground film scene. Known as the “8mm Mozarts”, their films were noticeably different than other underground films of the time. They were wildly funny, but also human and vulnerable. Their films have inspired many filmmakers, but despite having high profile fans, the Kuchars remain largely unknown because they are only ambitious to make movies, not to be famous. It Came From Kuchar interweaves the brothers’ lives, their admirers, a history of underground film and a “greatest hits” of Kuchar clips into a mesmerizing stream of consciousness tale. (Tigerlily Pictures LLC) Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 10
  2. Negative: 0 out of 10
  1. Most of all, though, it's a welcome, offbeat look at a couple of originals, something that's in woefully short supply.
  2. The documentary is interesting as a human story. And anyone who loves the Kuchar brothers' films or underground cinema in general will take extra pleasure in it.
  3. 75
    You don't have to have ever seen any of their movies to enjoy It Came From Kuchar, directed by one of George's former students, Jennifer M. Kroot. But you'll probably want to catch up with their work afterward.
  4. Reviewed by: Ronnie Scheib
    70
    Gleefully piles on everything anyone could want in a docu on the fabulous Kuchar brothers, whose deliriously campy zero-budget mellers -- with titles like "Hold Me While I'm Naked" or "Sins of the Fleshapoids" -- enlivened many otherwise somber evenings of '60s underground cinema.
  5. Reviewed by: Nick Pinkerton
    70
    Jennifer M. Kroot's film opens up the careers that followed “Naked.” It's an accessible, professional job, with onscreen testimonials from Waters--whose work owes the most to them, and who has been their most faithful proselytizer--Guy Maddin, and Buck Henry.
  6. 70
    A valuable and intelligent introduction and tribute to their anarchic, uncompromising and absolutely peculiar genius.
  7. 40
    These guys belong in the avant-odd pantheon. They also deserve a stronger, more penetrating tribute.

See all 10 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 1
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 1
  3. Negative: 0 out of 1
  1. Oct 4, 2010
    9
    This is the entrance door to the quirky, excessive, marvelous world of the Kuchar brothers. Somewhat as the Maysels inspired many to document,This is the entrance door to the quirky, excessive, marvelous world of the Kuchar brothers. Somewhat as the Maysels inspired many to document, the Kuchars are mentors to such figures as John Waters, Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez. You'll mesmerize at their collaborations with Harry Crumb and Warhol. Yet the truly remarkable is their ongoing stamina and the continuous work with their alumni. Inspiring, truly. Expand

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