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62

Generally favorable reviews - based on 28 Critics What's this?

User Score
7.3

Generally favorable reviews- based on 44 Ratings

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  • Summary: A growing number of Evangelical Christians believe there is a revival underway in America that requires Christian youth to assume leadership roles in advocating the causes of their religious movement. This documentary, directed by Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady, directors of the criticallyA growing number of Evangelical Christians believe there is a revival underway in America that requires Christian youth to assume leadership roles in advocating the causes of their religious movement. This documentary, directed by Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady, directors of the critically acclaimed "The Boys of Baraka," follows Levi, Rachael, and Tory to Pastor Becky Fischer's "Kids on Fire" summer camp in Devil's Lake, North Dakota, where kids as young as 6 years-old are taught to become dedicated Christian soldiers in "God's army." (Magnolia Pictures) Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 28
  2. Negative: 2 out of 28
  1. Reviewed by: Ken Fox
    88
    The fact that Pastor Fischer would probably consider the film an accurate portrayal of her mission may be the most terrifying thing of all.
  2. 83
    This team has succeeded at making a film that opens a subculture without programming our responses to it.
  3. Reviewed by: Sara Brady
    75
    Doesn't function particularly well as a documentary; it lacks a strong editorial point of view and doesn't really comment on the evangelical movement so much as it just portrays a selection of people and their views.
  4. A fascinating glimpse of kids' role in the evangelical movement's political agenda.
  5. 63
    If we are in the midst of a culture war, as many people proclaim in Jesus Camp, then the left should be concerned. The right's Christian soldiers appear to be extremely well trained.
  6. Reviewed by: KJ Doughton
    60
    Jesus Camp works nicely as a time-capsule document confirming the impact -- and popularity -- of American evangelism.
  7. A snapshot, to be sure, but scattershot as well.

See all 28 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 20 out of 21
  2. Negative: 0 out of 21
  1. M.S
    Aug 8, 2007
    10
    It's so difficult to watch this as a Christian and wonder where these people went wrong. What message are these people listening to? If It's so difficult to watch this as a Christian and wonder where these people went wrong. What message are these people listening to? If the Christian God does indeed exist he has to be shaking his head in disgust at the people who twist the moral teachings of the Bible to corrupt children and breed hatred. This documentary is a real eye opener about a hypocritical religious and cultural crisis we face here at home. Before we fight terrorism we need to take a look at ourselves in the mirror. Collapse
  2. [Anonymous]
    Sep 22, 2006
    10
    Amazing
  3. SusanB.
    Dec 31, 2007
    10
    I think it is a wonderful program and I would like to get involved.
  4. BenD
    Jul 1, 2007
    8
    I liked it and will make sure my son who is 7 watches it again and again. God bless you all the kids in the movie
  5. ChadS.
    Nov 5, 2006
    8
    "Jesus Camp" doesn't need a liberal talk show-host to connect the dots for us, but at least the final dot is left to the audience. We "Jesus Camp" doesn't need a liberal talk show-host to connect the dots for us, but at least the final dot is left to the audience. We know what the big picture is. You can give the filmmakers a little credit by exercising some restraint by elbowing its viewers towards the proverbial elephant. There's absolutely no polemics about stem-cell research. The words are never uttered, only inferred at, when, (gulp), a camp speaker hands out fetuses for the children to contemplate at. The Christian evangelical right have been attacked before in film, and "Jesus Camp" does nothing to deter us from our, perhaps, elitist assertion that the "Jesus freaks" live in another world from us. But really, what does it say about your ideology when one of its constituents, the genuine article, appears to be more of an end result of some liberal filmmaker's satirical rendering than its actual fictional counterpart? Mama Sunshine in Todd Solondz's "Palindromes" seems relatively sane compared to her real-life counterpart in "Jesus Camp", where truth is, indeed, stranger than fiction. This documentary makes Brian Dannelly's "Saved" look like a p.r. campaign for the Christian right. Expand
  6. Aug 27, 2010
    7
    A very disturbing look at the growing radical Christians in the US. The film tries very hard to be unbiased by not including a narrator, butA very disturbing look at the growing radical Christians in the US. The film tries very hard to be unbiased by not including a narrator, but the filmmakers use the radio show host to bluntly voice their views. My only complaint is that it hits it point very early on and just rehashes it again and again through the rest of the film. But hey, it was enough to get the crazy camp closed down, so I applaud the filmmakers. Expand
  7. AdamL
    Apr 25, 2007
    4
    The fact that one of the comments below compares twenty-first century Evangelicals with members of the Taliban shows just how uninformed most The fact that one of the comments below compares twenty-first century Evangelicals with members of the Taliban shows just how uninformed most Americans are about Christianity. Disagreeing with a religion that preaches peace and love over all else is one thing; likening the more enthusiastic members of its parish to woman-hating mass murderers is another, and pretty abominable. Expand

See all 21 User Reviews

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